Jason Moon

Seacoast Reporter

Jason is NHPR's Seacoast reporter, and he also covers education. Before joining NHPR in February of 2015, Jason held internships with a variety of public radio organizations including StoryCorps, Transom.org, and WBHM in Birmingham, Alabama. He studied philosophy, political science, and audio documentaries at Bennington College in Vermont.

President Trump’s decision to end the DACA immigration policy could affect nearly 400 people here in New Hampshire.

Ron Abramson, an immigration attorney based in Manchester, says he’s been working with clients protected by DACA in the run up to this decision to explore their options.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Vermont senator and former presidential candidate Bernie Sanders made two stops in New Hampshire on Labor Day.

Senator Sanders started his day at the annual AFL-CIO breakfast in Manchester where he spoke alongside New Hampshire senators Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan.

Franklin Pierce University is offering free tuition, room, and board for the fall semester to up to 20 college students displaced by Hurricane Harvey.

Linda Quimby, vice president of enrollment at Franklin Pierce, says the move is meant, in part, to send a message to current students about moral leadership.

“We do think it sends a powerful message. And we also feel that it’s a way that Franklin Pierce can best reach out to individuals who may be impacted by the storm.”

Johannes Thiel via Flickr cc

High schoolers in the town of Northwood now have busses to take them to school again. But the town is still struggling to find drivers for elementary students.

Vermont Senator and former presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders will make two stops in the state on Labor Day.

Sanders will start his day with a speech at the annual AFL-CIO breakfast in Manchester. The event, hosted by the New Hampshire chapter of the country’s largest labor union, will also feature New Hampshire Senators Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan, and Representative Annie Kuster.

Later that morning, Sanders will speak at an event at Rollins Park in Concord hosted by the progressive group Rights and Democracy NH.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Off the coast of New Hampshire are the iconic Isles of Shoals.

Somewhere around the middle of those isles is a dotted line -- the state border between New Hampshire and Maine.

As part of our series Surrounded in which we look at life in and around New Hampshire's islands, Jason Moon found out that line has been the cause of some intense disagreement over the years.

The state liquor store near the Portsmouth traffic circle is set to receive a major upgrade.

The new building will be double the size of the existing liquor store and will offer some 6,000 different sizes and varieties of wines and spirits.

Joseph Mollica is Chairman of the New Hampshire Liquor Commission. He says replacing the old building is expected to generate a 10 percent increase in sales.

“The selection just isn’t there and we’re missing the boat. It’s time to step it up and get that store done.”

NHPR Staff

A new audit of the state’s Community College system found dozens of areas in need of improvement.

The audit, from the state’s Legislative Budget Assistant, identified 29 different areas of concern, ranging from unclear delineation of powers to conflicts of interests to questionable spending.

Republican State Senator John Reagan requested the audit.

Jason Moon for NHPR

School districts across New Hampshire have been grappling with a shortage of school bus drivers.

Nowhere has that situation become more dire than in Northwood, where officials have been forced to delay the start of the school year and to push back the start of the school day by two hours.

That’s causing big problems for parents.

CREDIT MIKE ROSS, UNH

The University of New Hampshire says, thanks to a new program, more than 400 incoming freshman will attend the school tuition free. 

Under UNH’s new ‘Granite Guarantee’ program, any full-time, first year student, who lives in New Hampshire and qualifies for federal Pell grants, can attend the university without paying for tuition.

Victoria Dutcher, vice president for enrollment management at UNH, says the program is designed to encourage more in-state students to attend.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Civil rights groups are filing a formal right-to-know request with the Manchester school district.

Speaking from the steps of city hall, Manchester NAACP president Eric Jackson said the school district hasn’t been transparent enough about its efforts to address racial inequities.

Jason Moon for NHPR

The Portsmouth City Council is changing the way it interacts with the public.

After a spirited debate Monday night, Portsmouth City Councilors voted 7-1 to replace every other meeting’s public comment period with a public dialogue session.

The dialogue session would allow councilors to respond to members of the public directly, something they can’t do during public comments.

Mayor Jack Blalock spoke in favor of the changes.  He said it's meant to increase public engagement in city council meetings.

The future of a proposed utility project on the Seacoast is facing new uncertainty.

The Site Evaluation Committee on Monday said all scheduled hearings on an Eversource plan to build a transmission line across the Seacoast will be postponed indefinitely. The SEC says the process can't go on without a final report from the Department of Environmental Services on the potential impacts of the project.

Jason Moon for NHPR

With Congress out on its annual August recess, New Hampshire’s congressional delegation has been enjoying more time in the state.

On Thursday, Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen spent the afternoon exploring Great Bay.

Senator Shaheen’s visit to Great Bay felt a lot like a school field trip.

It began at UNH’s Jackson Laboratory on Adam’s Point, where one scientist after another showcased their research on Great Bay’s marine life.

From investigating whether the invasive green crab problem could turn into a local culinary opportunity.

A state representative is calling for the resignation of New Hampshire's state epidemiologist. At issue is the validity of a new study about the health effects of exposure to certain water contaminants.

Democratic rep Mindi Messmer of Rye and state epidemiologist Ben Chan are both members of a task force investigating a cancer cluster identified on the Seacoast last year.

New Hampshire State Police

State police say they now know the true identity of the suspect in two high-profile New Hampshire cold cases.

State police say Terry Peder Rasmussen is the name of the man responsible for the murder of four still-unidentified people found in barrels near Bear Brook State Park. They say he is also responsible for the disappearance and presumed murder of Denise Beaudin from Manchester in 1981.

Peter Biello for NHPR

Department of Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut is facing fresh criticism about engaging in political activity while in office.

Edelblut is scheduled to be the keynote speaker at a so-called Right of Center Meeting next month.

Jason Moon for NHPR

At the center of the weekend's turmoil in Charlottesville is a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. 

While New Hampshire isn't seeing much debate over old confederate monuments, at a post office in Durham, a 1950's-era mural is raising questions about race and another uncomfortable chapter from our nation's history.

With the electronic gambling game keno now legal in New Hampshire, city governments across the state are starting to consider whether they want it in their communities.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Democratic U.S. Senator Maggie Hassan says the Trump administration should endorse the findings of a federal report on climate change that was recently leaked to the New York Times.

At a League of Conservation Voters event in Portsmouth, Hassan told reporters that while she had concerns about the leaking of draft documents, she thinks the Trump administration should endorse the report’s findings.

The report, compiled by scientists from 13 federal agencies concludes that climate change is already affecting Americans’ daily lives.

A large federal building occupying prime real estate in Portsmouth is getting one step closer to being turned over to the city.

After almost 15 years of talks with the city about the fate of the Thomas J. McIntyre building in downtown Portsmouth, the federal General Services Administration says it is planning to move out by next fall.

File Photo

Deep sea fishing companies say they are feeling the squeeze from new regulations on recreational fishing.

The new rules for recreational fishing come from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. They reduce the number of haddock anglers can catch from fifteen to twelve each day and they eliminate cod fishing altogether.

File Photo

Federal regulators are tightening catch limits for recreational fishing of cod and haddock in the Gulf of Maine.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is reducing the number of haddock that anglers can take each day and it’s limiting the number of days they can be fished.

The agency is also continuing its ban on recreational cod fishing.

Officials with the town of Durham say they remain concerned about a proposal to bury a long-distance power cable across a one-mile stretch of Great Bay.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu says he disagrees with President Donald Trump’s decision to ban transgender people from serving in the armed forces. In an interview Thursday afternoon, Sununu said anyone who is physically and mentally fit should be able to serve in the U.S. military.

Efforts to clean up PFCs at the former Pease Air Force Base will be the topic of a meeting tonight in Portsmouth. Air Force officials plan to give an update on where those efforts stand, 3 years after the contamination was first discovered.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Prescott Park in downtown Portsmouth has long attracted locals and tourists alike with its historic backdrop and waterfront views.

But over the last few years it’s also attracted a fair amount of controversy.

At issue is both the history and future of the park.

An investigation by the state Attorney General’s office has concluded that state troopers were justified in their use of deadly force in the shooting of a Portsmouth man last month.

At a press conference Thursday afternoon, investigators released audio and video evidence of the encounter between police and Barry Jones outside the Hampton state liquor store in June.

Courtesy the Hampton Historical Society

Imagine you’re at Hampton Beach, strolling down Ocean Boulevard. To one side you have the long sandy beach and open ocean; to the other, a seemingly endless row of motels, restaurants, arcades, and t-shirt shops.

When the breeze picks up, you can just catch the smell of sunscreen and fried dough. It’s the quintessential Hampton Beach scene. But it turns out that your view of it can depend a lot on which side of the boulevard you’re standing on – the side owned by the state or the side owned by the town.

Flikr Creative Commons / Ken_Lord

A Hampton fisherman wants to take his concerns about federal fishing regulations to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Hampton fisherman David Goethel says the federal government shouldn’t be able to force him to pay for his own at-sea monitors. At-sea monitors are regulators who accompany fishermen on some fishing trips to make sure catch limits are being observed.

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