Jessica Taylor

Jessica Taylor is the lead digital political reporter for NPR. Based in Washington, D.C., she covers the 2016 elections and national politics for NPR digital.

Before joining NPR in May 2015, Taylor was the campaign editor for The Hill newspaper where she oversaw the newspaper's 2014 midterm coverage, managed a team of political reporters and wrote her own biweekly column.

Prior to The Hill, Taylor was a writer and producer for MSNBC's "The Daily Rundown with Chuck Todd" and a contributor to the NBC News Political Unit. She covered and reported on the 2012 election as a senior analyst for The Rothenberg Gonzales Political Report. Her quotes have appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today, as well as several state and regional newspapers across the country. Taylor has also appeared on MSNBC, Fox News, C-SPAN, CNN and other local network affiliates.

On Election Night 2012, Jessica served as an off-air analyst for CBS News in New York, advising producers and reporters on House and Senate races.

Previously, Jessica was editor of National Journal's "House Race Hotline" and Assistant Editor for POLITICO during the 2010 midterms. She began her career in Washington as the research director for The Almanac of American Politics.

A native of Elizabethton, Tenn., she is a graduate of Furman University in Greenville, S.C. and now lives in Alexandria, Va.

Libertarian Party candidates Gary Johnson and Bill Weld pitched themselves as the antidote to Washington partisanship in a CNN town hall, hoping to appeal to voters frustrated with both the Republican and the Democratic presidential nominees.

Both are former Republican governors — Johnson from New Mexico and Weld from Massachusetts — and told CNN's Anderson Cooper they align with most voters on both fiscal and social issues.

Donald Trump boasts about the businesses he's built and that he would be the "greatest jobs president that God ever created." But Hillary Clinton is hitting him for making many of his products overseas and not in the U.S.

On Wednesday the Democratic nominee toured the Knotty Tie Co. in Denver, Colo., and invited her Republican rival to do the same to see where he might transfer some of his business.

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In an unusual electoral twist, it was the GOP establishment who claimed victory over conservatives with the primary defeat of Kansas Rep. Tim Huelskamp on Tuesday night.

Buoyed by agriculture interest groups and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, obstetrician Roger Marshall easily ousted the three-term congressman who was one of the most hard-line conservative members of the House and a member of the rabble-rousing Freedom Caucus.

America's first image of Chelsea Clinton was as a curly-haired preteen girl with braces who shied away from the public stage while her father was president in the 1990s.

More than two decades later, the now 36-year-old mother of two will voluntarily step into the spotlight to introduce her own mother as her family seeks a return to the White House.

Donald Trump urged Russian agents to "find" his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton's emails and release them, an unprecedented move by a candidate for president encouraging such a foreign breach.

"Russia, if you're listening, I hope you're able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing," the GOP presidential nominee said at a news conference in Miami on Wednesday. "I think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press."

When Joe Biden takes the stage at the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night, there is probably a part of him that still wonders, "What if?"

But his own White House dreams and reported rivalry with Hillary Clinton will have to be in the rearview mirror in order for him to deliver a home run endorsement, starting on stage and continuing through November.

Democrats' attempts to put on a unified front on the first day of their convention in Philadelphia got off to a disastrous start Monday morning.

Primary runner-up Bernie Sanders was loudly booed when he spoke to his supporters after telling them they needed to vote for Hillary Clinton and her running mate Tim Kaine.

Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine is Hillary Clinton's choice for her vice president, giving her a running mate with experience at all levels of government to round out the Democratic ticket.

Clinton told supporters the news in a text message and a tweet on Friday evening just after 8 p.m. ET. According to a Clinton campaign official, the former secretary of state called Kaine this evening to make the formal offer.

Painting a grim picture of America, Donald Trump promised to protect the country and restore "law and order" by putting "America First" in his address Thursday evening formally accepting the GOP nomination for president.

It was supposed to be Indiana Gov. Mike Pence's political coming-out party, but drama with Ted Cruz largely overshadowed his moment at the Republican National Convention.

The crowd quickly turned on Cruz on Wednesday night after he refused to endorse GOP nominee Donald Trump.

The Texas senator and Republican primary runner-up was initially met with a warm reception, holding the crowd in the palm of his hand as he told emotional stories about the recent police shootings in Dallas and how America had to defend the Constitution and the freedoms of speech and religion.

Ted Cruz couldn't even make it through thanking his own supporters without being overshadowed by Donald Trump.

Before speaking at the Republican National Convention Wednesday night, the Texas senator and 2016 GOP primary runner-up had gathered over 1,200 of his volunteers and backers at a restaurant on a dock along the Cleveland waterfront, firing them up as though he was back at a campaign rally.

He hadn't mentioned Trump at all, instead boasting of the victories they amassed in the primary and just how close they came.

Tuesday was technically Donald Trump's night — he officially received the party's presidential nomination — but as it went on, the speakers at the Republican National Convention homed in on his rival, Hillary Clinton, and not what he would do as president.

Republicans have officially nominated Donald Trump as their presidential nominee, with his home state of New York putting him over the top.

A chaotic first day at the Republican National Convention gave way to an emotional evening centered on national security and capped off by a rousing speech by Donald Trump's wife, Melania.

The first night of the Republican National Convention is focused on national security, with presumptive nominee Donald Trump designating the theme as "Make America Safe Again."

Chaos erupted on the floor on the first day of the Republican National Committee in Cleveland, as forces opposed to Donald Trump tried — and failed — to make one last stand.

Arkansas Rep. Steve Womack brought up the Rules Committee report, which would keep delegates bound to Trump. Anti-Trump forces began shouting and wanting a roll call vote in a last-ditch effort to unbind GOP delegates and let them vote their "conscience."

When the Republican National Convention officially gavels into order Monday, some major GOP leaders will be conspicuously absent.

The remaining former GOP presidents and the party's past two Republican nominees are not coming to Cleveland. Neither are some former 2016 GOP presidential candidates. More than 20 senators and several House members, along with a half-dozen Republican governors, won't be here either.

Even though House Speaker Paul Ryan has endorsed Donald Trump, he has continued to have plenty of criticism for his party's presumptive nominee.

In an interview with NPR's Steve Inskeep on Thursday afternoon in his office in the Capitol, Ryan was optimistic that Trump would come around on free trade agreements and the controversial tone he's used on the campaign trail.

House Speaker Paul Ryan knows what it's like to be thrown into running for vice president. Just four years ago, he was named Mitt Romney's running mate in the former Massachusetts governor's failed bid for the presidency.

Donald Trump has chosen Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his vice presidential running mate, a source with direct knowledge confirms to NPR's Mara Liasson.

A rollout in New York City had been planned for Friday at 11 a.m., but Trump tweeted Thursday evening that "in light of the horrible attack in Nice, France," he was postponing that announcement.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has apologized for what she called "ill-advised" comments she made earlier this week criticizing presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

"On reflection, my recent remarks in response to press inquiries were ill-advised and I regret making them," Ginsburg said in a statement Thursday morning. "Judges should avoid commenting on a candidate for public office. In the future I will be more circumspect."

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Hillary Clinton will already make history with her nomination for president, becoming the first woman to lead a major presidential ticket. Now the question is whether she wants to do it again with her choice of running mate.

Clinton is expected to name her vice presidential pick sometime after the Republican National Convention ends and before her own convention begins in Philadelphia on July 25.

On her list are several Hispanic lawmakers, African-Americans and at least one woman.

Bernie Sanders is expected to endorse Hillary Clinton on Tuesday at an event in New Hampshire, a Democratic source with knowledge of discussions between the two campaigns tell NPR's Tamara Keith.

Clinton secured enough delegates to clinch the Democratic nomination just over a month ago, but Sanders has stayed in the campaign — though he kept a lower profile.

Donald Trump may have clinched the GOP nomination and commands attention with his unorthodox presidential campaign, but President Obama says Trump's record low favorability ratings show he hasn't won over the hearts and minds of the country just yet.

Voters go to the polls in five states on Tuesday, where congressional primaries in New York and Colorado in particular could have an important impact on key competitive House and Senate races.

Democrats hope to contest as many as four congressional seats in the Empire State, a place that could prove critical in whether they're able to flip the 30 they need to win back the House.

President Obama is warning against financial and international "hysteria" in the wake of last week's vote by the United Kingdom to leave the European Union.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio has changed his mind and will indeed run for re-election to the U.S. Senate.

It's a big departure for the former presidential candidate, who had repeatedly maintained that there was no "Plan B" if his campaign for the presidency did not work out. Even after withdrawing from the White House contest in March, Rubio continued to insist he was not going to run again and even mocked such insinuations that he would reverse course.

But on Wednesday, Rubio did just that. In a statement, he admitted it was a puzzling turn of course.

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