Josh Rogers

Senior Political Reporter and Editor

Josh has worked at NHPR since 2000 and serves as NHPR’s State House reporter. Before joining the staff, he lived in New York, where he worked for a number of different magazines.

Josh’s award winning reporting can be heard locally but also regularly airs on national broadcasts of NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Josh is also a frequent analyst on political talk shows in the state. He grew up in Concord, and holds a Bachelor of Arts in American Studies from Reed College.

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Tracy Lee Carroll for NHPR

 

Last night was vindication for Mitt Romney as the former Massachusetts governor claimed nearly 40 percent of the vote; Texas Congressman Ron Paul took second with 23 percent.

"Thank you New Hampshire. Tonight we made history," said Romney.

Taylor Quimby for NHPR

A few dozen Romney supporters are chatting downstairs at Romney HQ after having been told by an apologetic staffer that the main event hall is filled to capacity.  Earlier tonight, a campaign staffer told the press that a SNHU scheduling conflict with FIRST Robotics is the cause of tonight's limited space.

Republican Presidential Candidates Make Last Push

Jan 9, 2012

 

Mitt Romney spent his Monday focusing vote-rich southern New Hampshire. He started at a chamber of commerce breakfast Nashua, where a comment he made about choice in health care,

“I like being able to fire people who provide services to me,”

became a late-breaking flashpoint.  Democrats and republicans rivals Newt Gingrich, Rick Perry and Jon Huntsman all piled on. So much so that at Romney’s next stop in Hudson he called a press conference, his first since the Iowa caucuses, to defuse the matter.

The University of New Hampshire poll shows Mitt Romney at 44 percent support, up five points from two weeks ago. Texas congressman Ron Paul stands at 20 percent. UNH survey center director Andy Smith says the race for now – at least -- is for third.

“But because NH voters make up their minds very late that could easily be for second, should Ron Paul slip up and or should some of the support for the non-Paul and non Romney candidate go to Santorum or Gingrich or Huntsman.”

Tracy Lee Carroll, NHPR. File photo

The primary trail is busy again, with Iowa in the rearview mirror and just days before Granite Staters cast their votes.

NHPR's Josh Rogers shares the latest from the trail with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson, including what Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum are doing as they hope to build on the results of the Iowa caucuses.

Campaigning in New Hampshire, Republican Mitt Romney accused President Obama of creating a bad business climate.

Romney said the President’s policies are designed to help his political allies more than the country as a whole.

He told voters in Salem that President Obama packed the National Labor Relations Board with union stooges; that he used the stimulus to repay public sector unions, and that the President backed green jobs initiatives to benefit supporters at companies like Solyndra.

 

Republican Mitt Romney looks to solidify support here after his narrow win in Iowa.

New Hampshire is supposed to be where Mitt Romney wins big. But his first event only half filled a school gymnasium. With John McCain at his side, Romney cast himself as a candidate capable of uniting all Americans.

“I want America to remain one nation under god. I want to bring us together. I want to restore the principles that made us the hope of the earth, I don’t want to transform America into something that we don’t recognize. I want to restore America.”  

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman is the only high-profile candidate not fighting it out in Iowa. Campaigning in Pembroke this morning, Huntsman suggested that the Iowa caucus results would prove extremely perishable.

“We’ll remember them for about seven hours and then people will be focused on New Hampshire. And this will be the ballgame here because this is a primary, because this will be a broad-based turnout of Republicans and independents and even some Democrats.”

You may not have heard of Buddy Roemer. But he's running for president. And despite an impressive resume and gift for turning a phrase, Roemer barely registers in the polls. He's conducting his quixotic run for office without accepting campaign contributions that exceed $100.

Politicians and journalists always run a risk when they judge a voter strictly on on appearances.

There was a reminder of that Monday when Mitt Romney was forced to defend his opposition to gay marriage during a restaurant encounter with a grizzled Vietnam veteran who happened to be gay.

As it turned out the vet, Bob Garon, also was sitting at a restaurant booth with his husband when the unsuspecting Romney, campaigning at the Manchester restaurant, asked if he could sit down with them.

 

Mitt Romney didn’t mention Newt Gingrich by name during a town hall meeting at a Hudson VFW hall. But he told reporters that he won’t back away from the tough talk of his campaign surrogates, including former New Hampshire Gov. John Sununu, who’s said that Gingrich is unstable.

“I am not going to distance myself in any way because those are their experiences, characterizations they’ve made. But I’d also note, however, that the most harsh criticisms of the speaker have come ... from those who haven’t endorsed me.”

Josh Rogers

Tea Party voters were expected to play a key role in the 2012 republican presidential primary. But with movement hopefuls Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry low in the polls, and Herman Cain now out of the race, the Tea Party vote remains very much in play.  Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul may stand most to gain. New NHPR’s Josh Rogers reports.

 Attend any NH campaign event with a Tea Party flavor and you will come across more than a few voters like Mark Grenier.

“Mitt Romney? I’d spit on his shoes. The man’s flip-flops, health care, you can’t trust him.”

Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign is starting to criticize Newt Gingrich -- and turning to former Governor John Sununu to lead the attacks. NHPR’s Josh Rogers reports.

Governor Sununu is practiced at delivering political put-downs. His flashed a sharp-tongue at the state house and relished the role of enforcer as President George H.W. Bush’s chief of staff. In a Romney campaign call with reporters, Sununu took aim at Newt Gingrich’s comment, since recanted, that Paul Ryan’s budget plan amounted to “right-wing social engineering.”

 

Republican Herman Cain says he’s continuing to reevaluate the future of his presidential campaign. NHPR’s Josh Rogers reports Cain says he needs to talk to his wife before deciding if he stays in the race. 

Herman Cain called the allegation he’d been involved in a long-term extramarital affair “trumped up” and said it showed the length his opponents would go to derail his campaign. But Cain also acknowledged the alleged affair, which follows earlier allegations of sexual harassment, is prompting him to rethink his candidacy.

 

Stumping in NH today, Rick Perry worked to shore up his credential on immigration. But as NHPR’s Josh Rogers reports the Texas governor’s message was overshadowed by a miscue.

Rick Perry made several stops in the company of Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who is well-known for arresting illegal immigrants. But during an event at St. Anselm College, where Arpaio was greeted with some booing, Perry seemed unaware that the legal voting age is 18 not 21.

Most presidential hopefuls see a strong showing in the N.H. primary as important. For republican Jon Huntsman, it is essential. The former Utah Governor has staked his whole campaign on the first in the nation primary. NHPR’s Josh Rogers reports.

 Jon Huntsman travelled to NY city this past weekend to poke fun at his New Hampshire-centric approach on Saturday Night Live.

Cain Returns To N.H.

Nov 17, 2011
Josh Rogers, NHPR

Republican Herman Cain is back in NH today. The visit is his first since early October. NHPR’s Josh Rogers reports.

 A lot has changed for Herman Cain in the last 5 weeks. The former businessman has faced sexual harassment allegations, and was videoed as he struggled to answer a basic policy question on Libya. Cain told reporters in Concord that he remains strong in the polls and said getting out of the race was never an option.

Gingrich Gets Going

Nov 16, 2011
Josh Rogers

Former House speaker Newt Gingrich’s surge to the top tier of the GOP presidential field has been sudden. Its also come without the benefit of a traditional campaign structure in early voting states. NHPR’s Josh Rogers reports.

 Newt Gingrich predicted victory when he opened his state campaign headquarters in Manchester last week. But Gingrich also told supporters winning wouldn’t be easy.

With 60 days until the NH primary, people are wondering if anyone will be able to catch Mitt Romney.

The strengths of Mitt Romney’s NH campaign are on full display in these 25 seconds.

Josh Rogers / NHPR

Jennifer Horn, House Speaker William O'Brien, and Kevin Smith call press conference to tell media to stop reporting "innuendo" about Rick Perry's speech to Cornerstone Action. NHPR's Josh Rogers reports.

Josh Rogers / NHPR

Secretary of State Bill Gardner chooses expected date, and says NH tradition lives on.

NH law requires its primary be held at least a week before any similar election. When Nevada tried to schedule its caucus in mid-January, NH threatened to hold the primary in December. Under pressure from national republicans and facing a boycott from some candidates, Nevada backed off, giving NH’s secretary of state Bill Gardner the window he sought.

"The tradition of NH presidential primary lives on and it will be held on the second Tuesday, the 10th day of next year 2012.

Perry Files For Primary

Oct 28, 2011
Josh Rogers / NHPR

Texas Governor Rick Perry tells reporters he doesn't look at polls and plans to win here. NHPR's Josh Rogers reports.

 As he filed his candidacy Rick Perry touted his record on jobs as Texas Governor and brushed aside questions about his steep drop in the polls.

“I am here to win. I am here to talk to the people of NH about here how we get americans to back to work in, and you know granite staters get it.”

Proposal to allow two NH casinos clears ways and means committee by 14-7 margin. NHPR's Josh Rogers reports.

The 14-7 vote by the house ways and means committee runs counter to years of anti-gambling votes in the house. And it comes in the wake Massachusetts' passing bills that call for three resort casinos and one slot machine parlor. House Majority leader DJ Bettencourt of Salem hopes votes on Beacon Hill have changed the changes the equation on gambling for many house members.

Josh Rogers / NHPR

Former House Speaker joins race and signs pledge to cut taxes, spending and the size of government. NHPR's Josh Rogers reports.

Republican Newt Gingrich has added his name to the list of NH primary The former house speaker described vying for the presidency here as an awesome experience.

"From my perspective this is a place that is one of the great centers of American self-government. People have been made and broken in this state and it’s the center of real conversation."

Judiciary committee votes 11-6 to replace same-sex marriage with civil unions for any unmarried adults – even relatives. NHPR's Josh Rogers reports

By an 11 to 6 margin the house judiciary committee voted to undo the state’s 15-month-old gay marriage law and replace it with civil union for any unmarried adults – even relatives. The bill’s lead sponsor, Republican David Bates of Windham, says he expects the full House to endorse the proposal as drafted.

Josh Rogers / NHPR

Romney says he expects primary to intensify but says focus should be on President Obama. NHPR's Josh Rogers reports.

Mitt Romney was flanked by top local supporters as he signed the paperwork necessary to compete in NH.

"I am happy to put my name on this paper, hoping that this time it will take, and I’ll be able to become the nominee of our party and hopefully the next president of the United States."

"Go Mitt Go."

January 10 New Hampshire primary now looks likely. NHPR's Josh Rogers reports.

Nevada is bowing to pressure from national party leaders by moving its caucus from January 14th to February 4th. Before the date change, NH was threatening to hold its 2012 presidential primary in December of this year. Steve Duprey, a NH delegate to the RNC, says getting Nevada officials to push back the caucus wasn’t easy.

"It was extensive discussion that allowed us to get there and Rience Priebus the national chairman was very involved – and that’s a great result."

Erik Eisele

Minnesota Congresswoman's local campaign workers resign en masse. NHPR's Josh Rogers reports.

Michele Bachmann announced her presidential run at a debate here in June. And during each of her 4 trips to NH, Bachmann's been quick to insist she is a natural fit for the state.

"NH is all about low taxes and liberty and that’s what I’m about, so we are perfect match. We are a marriage made in heaven."

rvaphotodude

Primary Sounds

Jan 27, 2004

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