Mary Louise Kelly

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Where there is classified information, there will be leaks.

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UNIDENTIFIED MAN: There is a leaking epidemic in Washington.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Edward Snowden, the 29-year-old whistleblower...

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In Las Vegas today - a search both for clues and for a motive for Sunday night's mass shooting which left 59 people dead and more than 500 injured. The death toll may rise as many victims remain in critical condition.

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Hurricane Irma, this massive storm that really appeared on radar to be covering the entire state of Florida, is now finally weakening. But it is still disrupting so many lives.

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PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: Our troops will fight to win. We will fight to win.

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President Trump was out of sight today, huddling with his national security team at Camp David. On the agenda - a much delayed decision on a plan for America's longest war. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly reports.

On a steamy August afternoon in McLean, Va., not far from CIA headquarters, Daniel Hoffman sits on a coffee shop terrace and reminisces about summer afternoons spent in a different place.

"There's a tennis court, and a little dacha with a sauna," says Hoffman. "And then a big dacha where families could go and get out of the city in the summer and relax."

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We are broadcasting from here in Moscow on a day of anti-government protests across this country.

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UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Chanting in Russian).

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Here in the Russian capital, and what a day it's been.

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UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Chanting in Russian).

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Chanting in Russian).

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David Greene is on the line from Moscow. David, are people saying just the same thing there?

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It has been six weeks since FBI Director James Comey publicly acknowledged that the bureau is running an investigation into Russia and the 2016 election.

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In the early days of the 20th century, the United States Radium Corporation had factories in New Jersey and Illinois, where they employed mostly women to paint watch and clock faces with their luminous radium paint. The paint got everywhere — hair, hands, clothes, and mouths.

They were called the shining girls, because they quite literally glowed in the dark. And they were dying.

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We want to turn now to U.S.-Russia relations. It's been a dizzying change from just a few weeks ago when President Trump had nothing bad to say about Russia. But here he is this past Wednesday at the White House.

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I was boarding a plane to Istanbul when a friend recommended the Yashim series of mystery novels.

Great reads, he told me, about a Turkish detective who whips up marvelous feasts in between solving crimes. That sounded promising, so I downloaded the first book for the flight. And I was hooked, racing through chapters with Yashim as he prowls Istanbul's dark alleys, spice markets and kitchens.

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Just when you thought U.S.-Russia relations couldn't get worse, diplomatic deals on both Syria and nuclear security fell apart this week.

Moscow went first, announcing that it was pulling out of a landmark agreement on plutonium. Russia's President Vladimir Putin blamed "unfriendly actions" by the United States.

Hours later, Washington said it was breaking off talks on a ceasefire in Syria. "This is not a decision that was taken lightly," State Department spokesman John Kirby wrote in a statement. "Unfortunately, Russia failed to live up to its own commitments."

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In a courtroom in Knoxville, Tenn., the latest legal twist is unfolding in a case involving China — and alleged nuclear espionage.

Szuhsiung "Allen" Ho has been jailed since April. He's a nuclear engineer and consultant, born in Taiwan and educated in the U.S.

Ho's case is one of a number involving scientists the U.S. government suspects may also be spies. The scientists in question are all American citizens; they were all born in mainland China or Taiwan.

Donald Trump on Wednesday called for Russia to hack Hillary Clinton's email and recover messages from her tenure as secretary of state. His comments followed reports that U.S. officials believe Russian hackers stole emails from the Democratic National Committee and arranged for their release.

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