Mary McIntyre

Morning Edition Producer

Ways to Connect

Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro will be in New Hampshire on Friday to speak with young people in the state. He served under President Obama's administration from 2014 to 2017.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Castro about his visit.


NHPR Staff

Voters approved an additional $307,153 to the proposed budget for Claremont schools Thursday night.

The amendment will offset a large part of cuts made to the proposed budget in January. Now the operating budget for the schools will be cut by only $22,000 compared to almost $340,000.

The budget will now go to the annual school district vote in March.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Stevens High School Principal Pat Barry who attended the deliberative session.

NHPR Staff

Governor Chris Sununu announced in December a new advisory council focusing on diversity and inclusion.

The council will present the governor with recommendations on how New Hampshire can improve equity in the state, including on issues of race, gender, age and disability.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Rogers Johnson who will chair the council.


https://www.weare.nh.gov/

After the small, southern New Hampshire town of Weare lost its community newspaper in 2016, library director Mike Sullivan stepped up to fill in missing media coverage.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Sullivan about how he produces and prints the weekly paper, Weare in the World,  from the town library.

 

Casey McDermott / NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu's Millennial Advisory Council is still waiting to hear the governor's feedback on a set of policy recommendations they put together at his request last month. 

In the meantime, the group continues to meet. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with council member Carolyn Leary about upcoming plans on how to address issues millennials are facing in the state. 


The Office of Child Advocate is a watchdog agency created last year by lawmakers as part of a larger effort to reform the state’s current child protection system.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Moira O’Neill, the new director of the office, about her plans for the agency.


UNH Carsey School

New Hampshire Public Radio kicked off a news series, The Balance, last weekIt looks at the costs, benefits and tradeoffs of life in New Hampshire, including why people move to -- or out of -- the state. Last year, New Hampshire saw its biggest population increase since before the Great Recession. Here to talk about what's behind that trend, is Ken Johnson, senior demographer with UNH's Carsey School.

Mary McIntyre

 

Ice Castles in Lincoln -- a giant ice structure spanning over an acre and weighing over 25,000,000 pounds -- has become a popular winter attraction in New Hampshire.

But how is this giant structure made, and maintained over the winter season? Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with site manager Tayler Christensen who gave him a behind the scenes tour.

 

(Editor's note: this transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.)  

How tall is that, about 30 feet or so? That archway?

CK4049 via Flickr CC

Gov. Chris Sununu voiced opposition to a commuter rail in New Hampshire during his campaign. But now he's supporting a $4 million feasibility study to look at how commuter rail could work.

NHPR's Jessica Hunt spoke with rail expansion advocate E.J. Powers on what Sununu's position change could mean for commuter rail in the state.

What do you make of Sununu's new position on commuter rail?

Dank Depot via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/9c93J6

New Hampshire’s medical marijuana program has more than doubled in size since 2016. About 4,700 patients were enrolled in the program by the end of 2017.

Michael Holt is the Therapeutic Cannabis Program Administrator for the Department of Health and Human Services. He joins us now to talk about how the state’s medical marijuana program has grown.

(Editor's note: this transcript has been edited lightly for broadcast.)

Casey McDermott / NHPR

Bhagirath Khatiwada is the new Cultural and Linguistic Competence Coordinator for the New Hampshire Department of Education. That means he's in charge of helping school leadership and teachers engage all students in the classroom, including children of immigrant parents.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Khatiwada, who himself immigrated to New Hampshire in 2008 from Bhutan.

visitnhcolleges.com

A professor from Keene State College is representing five of her students in a lawsuit against the city of Keene for failing to fulfill Right-to-Know requests.

Journalism professor Marianne Salcetti calls the students the “Keene State Five.” Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with her about the lawsuit.

(Editor's note: this transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.)

How did this all come about?

Abhi Sharma / Wikimedia Commons

Downtown Manchester and the Millyard have undergone redevelopment over the past decade with the opening of new restaurants and shops. But now residents are getting an independent bookstore.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Liz Hitchcock, co-owner of The Bookery Manchester, which will open this spring. And she plans to make this bookstore more than another retail establishment downtown, but also a gathering place for the community.

Allegra Boverman

A massive winter storm is moving along the eastern seaboard on Thursday.

 Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Gov. Chris Sununu about how New Hampshire is preparing for the storm and how to access assistance in a case of an emergency.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Two Republican senators, Ron Johnson of Wisconsin and John Barrasso of Wyoming, called off a planned trip to Russia last week after the Kremlin denied a visa to New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Shaheen about what she's calling Russia's travel sanction.


About 1,000 people are injured and nine people are killed each day in the U.S. in crashes involving a distracted driver. That’s according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

Shelters across the Granite State are working overtime to provide resources to homeless people exposed to winter weather. 

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with people working in shelters across New Hampshire about their efforts to provide help to those in need.

Ellen Groh is the executive director of the Concord Coalition to End Homelessness.

Homework
Scott Akerman, Flickr

Several New Hampshire school districts have already issued snow days this month, and there are more come as we head into winter.

As districts have considered different solutions to making up those missed days, there’s been an ongoing debate over the effectiveness of blizzard bags.

Blizzard bags include a full day of assignments, which are either sent home ahead of time or accessed online from home.

Ken Snow / Flickr Creative Commons

A hot mass of rock has been forming under the New England region for tens of millions of years now.

That’s according to a recent paper published in the journal Geology

firstnet.gov

Gov. Chris Sununu announced his decision for New Hampshire to opt out of FirstNet at the beginning of December.

FirstNet is a federal communications network that will connect first responders across all 50 states in the event of an emergency or disaster. New Hampshire would instead use an alternative plan to build its own statewide network using a company called Rivada Networks.

A group of education and economic development officials are discussing how to meet New Hampshire's workforce demands.

The group met in Bedford on Wednesday at a forum on the future of the state’s workforce. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Taylor Caswell, the commissioner of the Department of Business and Economic Affairs who attended the forum.

(Editor's note: this transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.)

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/accoster/2264295876/">adam coster</a> / flickr

Last month, members of the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas experienced the deadliest church shooting in recent history. Twenty-six people were killed.

Now the New Hampshire Council of Churches is sponsoring a training event tomorrow in Nashua on how congregations should respond to an active shooter.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Rev. Jason Wells, the executive director of the council.

(Editor's note: this transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.)

Suicide is the second leading cause of death among adolescents and young adults in New Hampshire, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

Exeter Hospital recently endorsed an initiative for suicide prevention as a part of a five-year strategy to address the on-going issue in the state.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Debra Vasapolli, director of community relations for the hospital, about the Zero Suicide initiative.

  (Editor's note: this transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.)

The state medical examiner’s office is dealing with a heavy workload amid the opioid crisis and staffing shortages. Its case load has nearly doubled in the last two decades due to population growth and the drug crisis. Former chief medical examiner Dr. Andrew Thomas retired this year, and Dr. Jennie Duval took his place.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Duval about how the office is coping with these challenges.

(Editor's note: this transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.)

policearchives.org

Small towns in New Hampshire are struggling to find and keep quality police chiefs. This fall, the town of Newbury let it's police chief go. Bristol's police chief resigned, citing personnel issues. And the town of Webster had disagreements with its police chief, a dispute which ended up in court.

Andrew Shagoury is the police chief for the town of Tuftonboro, and the president of the New Hampshire Association of Chiefs of Police. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Shagoury about the difficulties with hiring police chiefs in smaller towns.

courtesy of the Webster House

There’s a current shortage of beds in group homes throughout New Hampshire. In fact, 22 homes have closed in the past six years, and only 21 group homes are remaining.

Lou Catano is the executive director of The Webster House, a children’s home in Manchester. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Catano about House Bill 517, which will go into effect at the beginning of the year, and its potential impact on group homes in the state.

(Editor's note: this transcript has been lightly edited for clarity.)

Thomas Favre-Bulle / Flickr Creative Commons

Nashua schools are struggling with finding enough substitute teachers. School officials say it’s been a daily challenge for the past three years, and Nashua School District is looking at ways to address this issue.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Superintendent Jahmal Mosley about how the district plans to entice and retain more subs. 

(Editor's note: this transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.)

lookcatalog / Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire could become one of just a few states that allows birth control pills to be prescribed by pharmacists.

A commission appointed by the state legislature voted unanimously last week to endorse the idea.

firstnet.gov

The First Responder Network Authority, or FirstNet, is a federal program created by Congress in 2012 in response to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Police and fire departments were unable to communicate with each other that morning over incompatible radio systems. The FirstNet program aims to fix that with a secure communications network for first responders across all 50 states.

ThorPorre / Wikimedia Commons

The FDA announced last week that it plans to block U.S. shipments of a dietary supplement that's popular in New Hampshire.

The administration has issued an urgent warning about the herbal supplement kratom, saying it can be addictive and deadly. But former opioid users have said it’s helped them with recovery.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with state Sen. Martha Fuller Clark about kratom and its use in New Hampshire.

(Editor's note: this transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.)

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