Michael Brindley

Morning Edition producer

Michael came to NHPR in 2012, working as the station's newscast producer/reporter. In 2015, he took on the role of Morning Edition producer. Michael worked for eight years at The Telegraph of Nashua, covering education and working as the metro editor. Michael started his career in journalism working as a reporter for the Derry News. Michael is a New Hampshire native, born and raised in Nashua. He studied journalism at Keene State College.

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Nottingham State Representative Kyle Tasker has resigned.

The Republican was serving his third term in the New Hampshire House when he was arrested last week.

He faces four felony charges, including one count of using a computer to lure a minor for sex.

House Clerk Paul Smith read Tasker’s letter of resignation at the start of this morning’s House session.

www.fireapparatusmagazine.com

Tuesday is Town Meeting day, and if history is any indication, getting voters to sign off on multi-million dollar infrastructure projects could prove challenging.

Last year, voters in towns across New Hampshire turned down proposals to replace aging police and fire stations, construct new town buildings, and renovate old schools.

And New Hampshire’s rapidly aging population may have a lot to do with that.


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Many New Hampshire voters may feel a bit of déjà vu when they head to the polls for next week’s Town Meeting.

That’s because many of the projects up for votes Tuesday are reworked versions of multi-million dollar municipal projects vote that failed before.

In North Hampton, officials are asking voters to approve a new public safety complex for the town’s police and fire departments.

Barrington voters are again weighing a proposal to build a new town hall there.

Rebecca Droke/Pittsburth Post-Gazette

It’s a dream come true for lifelong broadcaster and New Hampshire native Tim Neverett, as he settles into his new job as play-by-play announcer for the Boston Red Sox.

The Nashua High School graduate was named as the new announcer in December, beating out more than 200 applicants.

He called his first games on Monday, a double header from Fort Myers, Florida.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

With former Republican presidential candidate Chris Christie now backing Donald Trump, New Hampshire's largest newspaper is calling its endorsement of the New Jersey governor a mistake.

"Boy, were we wrong," is the opening line of an editorial penned by New Hampshire Union Leader Publisher Joe McQuaid. 

A Virginia police officer who was shot and killed responding to a domestic violence call this weekend is being mourned in her home town of Merrimack.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen is calling on her Republican colleagues to do their jobs and hold confirmation hearings for President Obama’s nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

NHPR Staff

Republican Sen. Kelly Ayotte is calling on Democratic challenger, Governor Maggie Hassan, to sign a pledge that aims to limit third party spending in the race for US Senate.

The so-called People’s Pledge proposes the candidates agree to pay fines in the form of charitable donations when third party ads are aired in their favor.

That same pledge was used in the 2012 Massachusetts Senate race.


Ohio Governor John Kasich took the coveted second prize among Republicans in Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary.

But how did the rest of the GOP field fare?

Michael Brindley/NHPR

Voting may be a right for everyone, but for those with vision impairment, casting a ballot privately can be a challenge.

New Hampshire election officials are hoping to change that with the rollout of a new accessible voting system, called "one4all," during Tuesday's primary.

“I believe we’re one of the first if not the first state to fully adapt tablet-based technology," says David Morgan, president and CEO of the New Hampshire Association for the Blind. 

AP Photo/John Locher

New Hampshire voters will get one last chance to hear from the two Democratic presidential candidates Thursday night before heading to the polls for next week’s primary.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders will square off at a debate at the University of New Hampshire.

Boston Globe political reporter James Pindell joined NHPR's Morning Edition to talk about the Democratic race.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

Sometimes it can seem like everyone’s talking about the primary, especially now that it’s a week away.

But history shows there are certain groups of people who aren’t as likely to head out to the polls on Tuesday.

One of those pockets of the population is low-income people.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

Each year, roughly 10,000 students visit the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center in Concord.

When the anniversary of the Challenger disaster comes around each year, the center’s Executive Director Jeanne Gerulskis, you typically won't see a lot of fanfare.

“We celebrate Christa’s passion for education every day,” she said. “So generally we let Jan. 28 pass as if it’s any other day.”

Thursday marks 30 years since the break-up of the space shuttle Challenger, which claimed the life of Concord High School teacher Christa McAuliffe.

She was among the seven crew members on board who were killed.

McAuliffe had been selected from more than 11,000 applicants to be the first participant in the NASA Teacher in Space Project.

Jim Van Dongen was news director for New Hampshire Public Radio at the time, filing reports from Cape Canaveral for the station.

He now works as an adjunct professor of English at New Hampshire Technical Institute.

Mark via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8mdNZs

A bill that would decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana goes before a House committee Tuesday.

The proposal would make possession of up to a half ounce a civil violation with a fine of no more than $100 for a first offense.

Possession of greater amounts would remain a criminal offense.

New Hampshire is the only New England state where the possession of any amount of marijuana remains a criminal offense.

A similar bill passed the House last year, but was tabled in the Senate.

NHPR/Michael Brindley

It's no coincidence that Democratic presidential candidate Martin O'Malley has campaigning harder in Iowa than in New Hampshire. 

For a campaign that continues to lag in the polls, he's counting on the Iowa caucus changing the dynamic of what has essentially become a two-person race.

"Once the voters start to vote, that usually changes the dynamic. Not always, but usually. And the first state that comes up is Iowa, so that’s what we’re focused on," O'Malley said during an interview with NHPR's Morning Edition.

NHPR file photos

With every day that passes leading up to the New Hampshire primary, the pressure builds on Republican presidential hopefuls looking to make a splash here.


NHPR Staff

A proposal to increase New Hampshire’s minimum wage to $9.50 by 2019 goes before a House committee Tuesday.

The bill would re-establish a state a minimum wage, setting it at $8.25 next year.

New Hampshire lawmakers repealed the state’s minimum wage in 2011, and the state has since deferred to the federal minimum wage of $7.25.

That’s the lowest minimum wage in New England.

NHPR/Michael Brindley

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Rand Paul has pledged to do everything he can from keeping current front-runner Donald Trump from becoming the GOP nominee.

"I think he’s a bad messenger. I think he sends a bad message," the Kentucky Senator said during a campaign stop in Londonderry Saturday. "I think his message is not on limiting power; it’s on give me power. I think that’s a real problem and I’m going to do everything I can to make sure he’s not the nominee."

But Paul also says he'll back Trump if he's the eventual nominee.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Sen. Kelly Ayotte seems to be growing tired of the constant questions about whether she'll support Donald Trump if he's the eventual Republican presidential nominee.

"I think it's a favorite question of the press to ask all of us what we think about Trump, but we are a long way away from Feb. 9," she said Wednesday, when asked about whether she'll support the billionaire businessman.

NHPR/Michael Brindley

When a candidate comes to your town, there’s always a huddle of reporters with microphones and cameras. 

And we hear a lot from those candidates and their supporters at an event. 

But as we get closer to our First in the Nation Primary, here on Morning Edition we’re going to be those reporters with mics, talking with people at a town hall or a diner visit.  But you’re also going to hear us in the communities hosting the candidates, to find out what’s on voters’ minds. 

We start in Nashua at a town hall meeting for Marco Rubio at Nashua Community College.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/59937401@N07/5856886727/">Images of Money </a> / Flickr

The new legislative session kicked off last week, as lawmakers began the process of again sifting through the hundreds of new bills.

Many of these proposals would affect New Hampshire’s business community, including raising the state’s minimum wage, an issue that hasn’t gone anywhere in the past.

But could there be a spirit of compromise this year?

Jeff Feingold is editor of New Hampshire Business Review.

He joined NHPR's Morning Edition to talk about the new legislative session.

NHPR/Michael Brindley

Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio is pledging to undo each of President Obama’s executive orders, including his most recent actions aimed at curbing gun violence.

Speaking at a town hall meeting in Nashua Thursday, the Florida Senator said the president’s focus should instead be on enforcing existing gun laws.

"As opposed to try to add new ones that are only going to inconvenience law-abiding people because they're the only ones who are going to follow the law," Rubio said. 

Wikipedia

The president of Thomas More College of Liberal Arts in Merrimack is threatening legal action if the town approves a proposed medical marijuana dispensary across the street from the school.

Town officials gave conditional approval to the dispensary this week, which would be located in a former credit union on Daniel Webster Highway.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

With just a little more than a month to go before the New Hampshire primary, Republican Donald Trump continues to dominate the polls.

Now, as other GOP candidates aim their attacks at one another, it seems everyone else is now fighting for second.

James Pindell covers the New Hampshire Primary for the Boston Globe.

He joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about his reporting on the issue.

www.gofundme.com/garrettstrong

Friends of a Secret Service agent injured in a fatal crash last week in Wakefield say he sustained major injuries to his spinal cord and has no feeling or movement from the upper chest down.

Thirty-year-old Garrett Fitzgerald was one of four Secret Service agents injured in the crash.

Their vehicle was struck head on by a car being driven by 45-year-old Bruce Danforth, who was pronounced dead at the scene.  

The agents were part of a security detail for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

Flickr

A law taking effect Jan. 1, 2016 gives first-time DWI offenders the chance to apply for a limited driver's license.

But some say the new law doesn’t go far enough.

For years, New Hampshire had imposed a mandatory minimum 90-day license suspension for anyone convicted of drunk driving.

Now, first-time DWI offenders can, for a $50 fee, petition a judge for a restricted license that would allow them to drive only to work, school, doctor’s appointments, or to a rehabilitation program.

NHPR/Michael Brindley

A peer support center for mentally ill people in Manchester is closing its doors this week.

Granite Pathways Clubhouse opened five years ago. Members help to manage the day-to-day operations and offer support to one another. They also get help finding work or going back to school. 

But New Hampshire behavioral health officials say because the program doesn’t meet the state’s definition of a peer support agency, it doesn’t qualify for funding. 

Clubhouse organizers say that meant having to shut down.

NHPR/Michael Brindley

  Colleges and universities are increasingly relying on adjunct professors. In New Hampshire, nearly 60% of college teaching positions are filled by part-time, adjunct faculty.  But increasingly, adjuncts are complaining that low pay and poor working conditions are making the job difficult to keep.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

As it does at the end of each year, the Pulitzer-prize winning fact-checking service PolitiFact has named its "Lie of the Year."

With the 2016 presidential campaign in full swing, there was no shortage of debunked claims to choose from, but one particular candidate stood out in 2015. 

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