Rick Ganley

Host, Morning Edition

Rick joined NHPR as morning host in January 2009. He has a 20 year career in radio including on-air work at stations in Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire in formats from rock to classical. He was co-owner of an FM station in Maine in the mid 90s. Rick spent the last ten years as Operations Manager and Morning Host of WPNH-FM, Plymouth NH and Production Director for Northeast Communications Corporations' five-station group. He also writes occasional pieces on media and music for the Hippo, Manchester's weekly paper, and voices radio and TV spots on a freelance basis.

Contact

Morning Edition Program Page

Ways to Connect

A celebration of the maker movement is happening in Dover Saturday.

At the Mini Maker Faire, visitors will be able to do everything from build and launch their own rockets to learn how to publish a book.

The event is in its fourth year and will be held at the Children's Museum of New Hampshire in Dover.

A public transportation program that’s become a vital service for hundreds of people in Sullivan County is shutting down.

Community Alliance of Human Services announced last week its rural public bus service and volunteer driver program will come to an end Sept. 9 due to a lack of finances.

The bus service provides about 30,000 rides annually, running through Claremont, Newport, and Charlestown.

A program that organizers say was a critical lifeline for low-income residents of New Hampshire’s northernmost towns has closed.

The Pittsburg Area Community Service food pantry and thrift shop opened on Pittsburg’s Main Street six years ago, run entirely by volunteers.

But when the building’s owner notified organizers earlier this year that its lease would not be renewed, that led to its closure Saturday after a new home couldn’t be found in time.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

State Senator Martha Fuller Clark was the only one of New Hampshire's eight superdelegates to support Sen. Bernie Sanders.

That's despite Sanders' 22-point victory in in the state in February. 

She cast her vote during Tuesday night's roll call at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

But now that Hillary Clinton is officially the Democratic nominee and Sanders has endorsed her, Fuller Clark says it's time for all Democrats to rally behind the former Secretary of State.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen  says it's time for Bernie Sanders supporters to unite behind presumptive nominee Hillary Clinton.

"We can't afford to have people sitting on the sidelines complaining," Shaheen said, speaking to NHPR's Morning Edition from Philadelphia.

"I am reminded of the 2000 race between Al Gore and George W. Bush when people who were not happy with Al Gore in New Hampshire voted for Ralph Nader and swung the state’s four electoral votes to George W. Bush and that was the election," Shaheen said.

Allegra Boverman/NHPR

N.H. Democratic National Committeewoman Kathy Sullivan says she's "outraged" by leaked emails that seem to show Democratic National Committee officials favored Hillary Clinton over Bernie Sanders during the primary.

"I think somebody was asleep at the switch because when you have a neutrality rule in place, you’re supposed to follow the neutrality rule closely," Sullivan told NHPR's Morning Edition. "I was very disappointed to see that it was not followed at the DNC."

Kelli True / NHPR

Before the New Hampshire Primary, state Republican Party Chairwoman Jennifer Horn was outspoken in her criticism of Donald Trump, calling his comments about women "disrespectful" and his remark about Sen. John McCain not being a war hero "disgraceful."

She also called his proposed ban on foreign Muslims "un-American."

Now, Horn says she has no reservations about Trump, who Tuesday night became the Republican presidential nominee once the delegates cast their votes.

Via twitter.com/jepersing

New Hampshire’s Republican delegation is in Cleveland for day two of the party’s national convention.

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers is reporting from Cleveland this week. He spoke with Morning Edition's Rick Ganley about what they delegation is up to, and how they feel about what's transpired so far.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

On the Political Front is our occasional check-in with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers.

Republicans drafting the party's platform in Cleveland this week rejected appeals to soften language opposing same-sex marriage.

According to NPR, delegates supported language in this year's platform that says children "deserve a married mom and dad," and refers to "natural marriage" as between a man and a woman. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Senator Jeanne Shaheen says while passing the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act this week will be a step in the right direction, it's ultimately a disappointment because it doesn't include the funding needed to address the crisis.

"While it makes some changes in programs so that it expands what we can do under certain programs, it doesn’t include the funding that is so desperately needed," Shaheen told NHPR's Morning Edition.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

A hard-fought Democratic presidential primary comes to an end in New Hampshire Tuesday.

For Sanders supporters, this marks the end of a movement that began here with a resounding win in the first in the nation primary.

Kate Brindley for NHPR

"On the Political Front" is our occasional check-in with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Donald Trump was back in New Hampshire Thursday. The presumptive Republican presidential nominee held a private, town hall style event at a shuttered light bulb plant in Manchester.

It was Trump’s second trip here in just the last few weeks, and behind the scenes, there’s been a shakeup in his New Hampshire campaign since his last visit.

Michael Brindley for NHPR

Alcoholics Anonymous has become a well-known part of recovery, but now, Heroin Anonymous meetings are popping up all over the New Hampshire. The meetings are in large cities like Manchester and Nashua, but also in smaller communities where the addiction epidemic has taken a toll.

Advocates say one of the biggest gaps in the state is access to addiction treatment for pregnant women. And that’s where two women working in the medical field want to step in by opening a residential treatment facility for up to eight mothers and their babies in Rochester.

But as they’ve discovered, filling that need is no easy task.

One impact of the addiction epidemic has been a skyrocketing rise in newborns experiencing withdrawal after being exposed to opioids in the womb. 

From 2006 to 2011, the number of newborns in withdrawal more than doubled in New Hampshire, and hospitals say the problem is only getting worse.

Michael Brindley for NHPR

In Manchester, more than 100 people died of overdoses last year.

Despite those grim numbers, it’s a surprisingly positive atmosphere on a Thursday night at Hope for New Hampshire Recovery, a substance abuse recovery center in the heart of New Hampshire’s largest city.

Michael Brindley for NHPR

One way that people are trying to help make a difference in New Hampshire's epidemic of addiction is through recovery coaching, a peer-support model that's gaining momentum in the state.

Coaches support those in recovery by helping access treatment and other resources, like finding a job and a safe place to live as they try to get clean.

On a Saturday afternoon at the fire department, a handful of people are learning how to use the now widely available overdose-reversal drug Narcan. It’s one thing to get it into the hands of those who may need it, but it’s another to know how to use it properly.

Hope on the Front Lines is a week-long series focusing on the people and organizations working to make a difference on the front lines of New Hampshire's opioid crisis. The series culminated in an hour-long radio documentary that combined many of the stories into a single program.

Listen to the documentary:


Courtroom One Gavel
Joe Gratz / Flickr Creative Commons

The drug crisis is taking a toll on New Hampshire’s families, as more and more parents accused of abuse or neglect are dealing with addiction issues.

"On the Political Front" is our weekly check-in with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers. 

Getty Images

Lawmakers in Congress appear to be finding some common ground when it comes to dealing with the heroin and opioid addiction crisis.

But how much money will actually be put toward funding treatment and prevention programs remains a sticking point.

Via tainoconsultinggroup.com

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joins Morning Editing on Mondays to discuss the latest in New Hampshire politics and the news that's likely to shape the conversation among the state's lawmakers. 

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

"On the Political Front" is our weekly check-in with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

A mall in Concord may seem like an unusual place for the city's newest live-performance space.

The Steeplegate Mall is a poster child for the economic challenges facing malls across the country, struggling to compete with online shopping and a resurgent downtown.

But the opening of the Hatbox Theatre this month could mark a new beginning for the Steeplegate.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

"On the Political Front" is our weekly check-in with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

For minor league baseball players working toward making it to the big leagues, life isn’t always so glamorous.

Jon Berti is a 26-year-old second baseman for the New Hampshire Fisher Cats and is one of many players chasing that dream.

Berti has been with the Toronto Blue Jays organization since being drafted in 2011. He’s played everywhere from Vancouver, to Lansing, Mich., to Dunedin, Fla.

He’s been with New Hampshire since 2014, though spent some time with the Blue Jays’ triple-A affiliate Buffalo last season.

People living in poverty are often at greater risk for serious health problems. And for many, legal problems can be a contributing factor to those medical issues.

The National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership estimates one in six Americans have at least one civil legal problem that negatively affects their health.

A medical-legal partnership here in New Hampshire ended in 2011 in part due to state budget cuts, but is now up and running again.

Pages