Rick Ganley

Host, Morning Edition

Rick joined NHPR as morning host in January 2009. He has a 20 year career in radio including on-air work at stations in Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire in formats from rock to classical. He was co-owner of an FM station in Maine in the mid 90s. Rick spent the last ten years as Operations Manager and Morning Host of WPNH-FM, Plymouth NH and Production Director for Northeast Communications Corporations' five-station group. He also writes occasional pieces on media and music for the Hippo, Manchester's weekly paper, and voices radio and TV spots on a freelance basis.

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stfimprov.com

Tuesday nights in Portsmouth this summer are all about improv comedy.

Now in its 12th season, the “Stranger Than Fiction” comedy troupe puts on shows every Tuesday night at the Players’ Ring, coming up with material on the fly based on audience participation.

Fourteen Republican presidential candidates are taking part in Monday night’s Voters First Forum at St. Anselm College.

You can listen live to the forum on NHPR at 7 PM by clicking right here. 

That may sound like a lot, but organizers say it’s all about staying true to the spirit of the primary process.

Media outlets in New Hampshire, Iowa, and South Carolina organized the forum in response to networks shutting out low-polling candidates in nationally-televised debates.

You can hear the two-hour forum live on NHPR, starting at 7 p.m.

Brady Carlson/NHPR

As brash businessman Donald Trump continues his surprising surge in the national presidential polls, behind the scenes, there’s a well-known GOP operative from New Hampshire pulling the strings.

Corey Lewandowski was the director of the conservative Americans for Prosperity here in the Granite State.

He’s now campaign manager for Donald Trump.

NHPR Staff

A report finds that while New Hampshire is second in the nation in child wellbeing, it’s among the worst states when it comes to teen substance abuse.

In the annual Kids Count report, the Granite State ranked second behind Minnesota when using factors such as economic wellbeing, education, and health.

Michael Brindley for NHPR

A celebration is planned for Saturday at the Old Allenstown Meeting House to celebrate the building’s 200th anniversary.

It will also be the first open house at the building in a decade, which has been closed while restoration efforts were underway.

A fire in 1985 caused significant damage to the building’s roof and several pews. The restoration cost nearly $200,000, a project paid for through private donations and grants.

Via the NH Rebellion on Facebook

As they make their way around the Granite State, the presidential contenders being met by potential voters frustrated with the political influence of wealthy donors.

NHPR’s digital reporter Brian Wallstin has been reporting on the issue of money in politics and where the candidates stand, and he’s here to talk about what he’s learned.

Ella Nilsen / NHPR

It’s now been a year since operations at the supermarket chain Market Basket, a family-owned company with 75 stores across New England, came to a standstill as employees and customers rallied in support of Arthur T. Demoulas.

He was ousted as the company’s chief executive in June of 2014.

On The Political Front is our weekly conversation with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers. This week, a look at what's going on behind the scenes of New Hampshire's state budget battle.  

It’s now been a couple of weeks since Gov. Maggie Hassan vetoed the state budget. Very quiet weeks if the measure is true progress towards a budget deal, but very loud ones in terms of the partisan rhetoric about the budget. 

Craig Murphy via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5Syj9C

 As New Hampshire gets set to enact a ban on handheld cellphone use while driving, there is some evidence that such bans in other states have had little effect on accident rates.

In a 2014 study, researcher Dan Kaffine and others at the University of Colorado Boulder found no evidence that a California ban on using handheld cellphones while driving actually decreased the number of traffic accidents in that state.

Dan Kaffine joined Morning Edition to talk about the issue.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Iowa and New Hampshire have historically been the opening bells in the presidential nomination process.

But there are growing signs that the states may be losing their clout. Candidates appear to be more focused on running national campaigns, as opposed to connecting with voters in early primary states.

Michael Brindley for NHPR

An iconic part of Laconia’s downtown will soon be reborn.

In a deal announced this week, the Belknap Economic Development Council will purchase the historic Colonial Theatre for $1.4 million.

The city will loan the group the money to buy the theater, and assist in raising the $15 million needed for renovations.

The Colonial opened in 1914, but has been shut down since 2001.

Justin Slattery, executive director of the Belknap Economic Development Council, joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about plans for the theater.

C. Hanchey via Flickr CC.

There’s no shortage of options for Nashua voters when it comes to who’ll be the next mayor of the state’s second-largest city.

Six candidates are confirmed to be running, and that’s a big change from four years ago, when the city’s current Mayor Donnalee Lozeau ran unopposed.

Lozeau isn’t seeking re-election this time around, which has opened the door for others hoping for the job.

Kathryn Marchocki is a reporter for the Nashua Telegraph. She joined NHPR's Morning Edition to talk about how the race is shaping up.

Via The Thing in the Spring Website

An arts fair in Peterborough this weekend is aimed at the more budget-conscious arts consumer. Broke, the Affordable Arts Fair, features locally crafted work all priced under fifty dollars. The fair is being held this Saturday as part of the annual Thing in the Spring music festival.

Mary Goldthwaite-Gagne is co-founder of the fair, and she joined Morning Edition to talk about the event.

What's the idea behind the fair?

Flickr/Diana Parkhouse

The Granite State real estate market is heating up. 

The Manchester-Nashua market was ranked among the top 20 hottest markets in the nation last month, according to Realtor.com.

O'Dea

Three companies have been selected to open the state’s first four medical marijuana dispensaries.

NHPR Staff

On the Political Front is a weekly conversation with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers. This week, a look at the challenge facing lawmakers on coming to agreement on a new, two year state budget.

It’s getting to be that time of year in Concord – where House and Senate committees meet to negotiate agreements, or fail to negotiate agreements, on key issues. The state budget is, of the course the biggie.

wentongg, Flickr

While combating cyberbullying has been the emphasis for school officials and lawmakers of late, it turns out it may not be as emotionally damaging to children as traditional, in person bullying.

That’s according to a new study out of the University of New Hampshire.

Kimberly Mitchell is with the UNH Crimes Against Children Research Center. She was the lead researcher on the study, and joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about her findings.

manchestermonarchs.com

In their final season in New Hampshire, the Manchester Monarchs could go out on a high note.

The team is headed to its first Calder Cup Finals. Game 1 is slated for Saturday night in Manchester against the Utica Comets.

Alex Hall covers the Monarchs for the New Hampshire Union Leader.

He joined NHPR's Morning Edition for a preview of the series.


thecaldorrainbow.blogspot.com

It’s a sign of the times in Keene, where the city’s last-standing video rental store announced this week it’s closing up shop.

Video HeadQuarters opened in 1983, and at one time was one of the highest-grossing video stores in the nation.

But a rapidly evolving home entertainment industry finally caught up with the business. The store will close next month.

Owner Ken McAleer joined NHPR’s Morning Edition from his video store in Keene.

NHPR Staff Photo

Summer is fast approaching, and for children from low-income families, that means an end to the free or reduced price lunches they get in school.

Wednesday, the state Department of Education and the USDA kicked off the annual Summer Meals Program.

Last year, the program fed more than 300,000 meals to children across the Granite State, and organizers expect that number to grow this summer.

Cheri White, administrator for the state Department of Education’s Bureau of Nutrition, joined Morning Edition to talk about the program.

flickr/bsabarnowl

A New Hampshire-based web application that aims to simplify the school dismissal process is getting a lot of attention.

PickUp Patrol, a student and parent-run startup company, was recently named the winner of the Ultimate New Hampshire Connection Tech Startup Competition.

The company’s founders spent Tuesday at the Statehouse, where they met with the governor and talked with industry experts about ways to grow the business.

Town of Derry

Deep budget cuts are causing controversy in the town of Derry.

At a meeting last month, the town council voted 4-3 to close one of the town’s fire stations. The budget also eliminates eight firefighter positions and cuts the department’s overtime budget by nearly half a million dollars.

Those opposed to the cuts are raising concerns about the impact on public safety.

USGS

As you may have noticed, it’s been unusually dry here in the Granite State for the past few months.

Thunderstorms Thursday afternoon provided some much-needed rain, but federal officials recently classified most of central and southern New Hampshire as being in a moderate drought.

David Miskus specializes in drought monitoring for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

He joined Morning Edition to talk about what this all means.

change.org

A battle is brewing at Pembroke Academy, and it’s all over a name.

Hundreds of people, including many staff and students, have signed a petition opposing the local school board’s decision to switch the title of the school’s top job from headmaster to principal.

Kelly Ayotte in Portsmouth
Cheryl Senter / NHPR

Sen. Kelly Ayotte continues to call for 1st District Congressman Frank Guinta to resign.

In an interview with NHPR's Morning Edition, Ayotte said if Guinta stays in office, the attention will continue to be on the Federal Election Commission's finding that he accepted more than $300,000 in illegal campaign donations from his parents in 2010. 

Colin Grey/flickr

Memorial Day weekend is upon us, marking the unofficial start of summer.

With the warm weather, farmers markets are opening for the season across the Granite State, but there aren't as many here as there used to be.

(Click here for the Department of Agriculture's directory of farmers markets for 2015, with times and dates)

Jane Lang is president of the New Hampshire Farmers Market Association. She joined Morning Edition to explain why.

flickr

All week long, we've has been looking at how disparities in early childhood can shape a child’s chances for later in life.

Issues surrounding what some call the opportunity gap and others call inequality of opportunity, are common concerns of politicians in both parties these days, starting at the very top.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

As part of our series, "The First Decade," Gov. Maggie Hassan sat down with NHPR's Morning Edition host Rick Ganley to talk about what role she sees state government playing in helping to close the opportunity gap.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

It makes sense that students who eat a healthy breakfast are more likely to perform well at school.

And while data shows that across the country, more students than ever are benefiting from school breakfast programs, the Granite State continues to lag in that area.

A report earlier this year found New Hampshire ranks second to last in participation in the national school breakfast program among low-income students.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Research is clear that parental involvement is critical to a child's success in school. But for a number of factors, that can be difficult for families in low-income households.

Maria Barry is the home and school coordinator for Ledge Street Elementary in Nashua, where 8 out of 10 students qualify for free or reduced lunch.

Rick Ganley visited Maria in her office at the school to talk about some of the challenges she faces in her job, as well as some of the success stories she's seen.

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