Sam Evans-Brown

Environment and Education Reporter

 

Sam Evans-Brown has been working for  New Hampshire Public Radio since 2010, when he began as a freelancer. His work has won several local broadcast journalism awards, and he was a 2013 Steinbrenner Institute Environmental Media Fellow at Carnegie Mellon University. He studied Politics and Spanish at Bates College, and before reporting was variously employed as a Spanish teacher, farmer, bicycle mechanic, ski coach, research assistant, a wilderness trip leader and a technical supporter.

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Environment
5:30 am
Mon July 23, 2012

Fewer Forest Fires Mean Fewer Habitats

Firefighter cadets with spray packs ensure that a small prescribed burn at the Concord airport doesn't get out of hand.
Sam Evans-Brown

Wildfires out West and in New Hampshire have been making headlines this spring and summer. Wildfires have burned 177 acres in the Granite State this year, damaging twelve buildings and injuring three people.

But when there aren’t any fires it can also lead to problems. Now some organizations have to set fires on purpose, to preserve a vanishing habitat.

If you want to get an idea what some parts of New Hampshire used to look like, you’ve got to find a spot where people don’t live. Like, alongside an airport runway.

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NH News
5:31 pm
Tue July 17, 2012

Unemployment Up to 5.1%; Labor Force Bigger than Expected

The New Hampshire Department of Employment security released the latest New Hampshire unemployment figures for today. Unemployment in June ticked up slightly; rising to a seasonally adjusted 5.1%, up from 5.0% in May.It is still down from where it was last June, when it was 5.5 percent.

Employment Security Economist Annette Nielsen says the increase is due to two factors: 5,000 more workers entered the labor force than this time last year, and fewer seasonal jobs were added than expected.

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Environment
1:51 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Milfoil Infiltrates Two More New Hampshire Lakes

Flikr Creative Commons / clrlakesand

The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services has found two more lakes in New Hampshire that have been infested with milfoil, an invasive aquatic plant. DES announced  that Otter Pond in Greenfield and Naticook Lake in Merrimack both have well-established milfoil infestations.

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Environment
5:43 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Making Carpentry Noble: Walpole Builders Team With French Guild

The apprentice compagnon with the completed cabin.
David Donohue

This week a home-building company in Walpole New Hampshire is playing host to 21 carpentry French apprentices, who in two days are building a replica of Thoreau’s Walden Pond Cabin. The exchange program hopes to do more than teach kids how to swing a hammer; It's just one way these builders are working to blend the old and the new.

Just north of Keene, Walpole New Hampshire is a quiet, unassuming spot. Though, quiet can be a relative term when the hammers and saws at Bensonwood Homes get going.

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NH News
4:35 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

Executive Council Approves Study of Private Prison Proposals

Flikr Creative Commons / Lorenzo Blangiardi

New Hampshire's Executive Council has approved hiring a consultant to assist the state in reviewing proposals from several companies to run its prisons. The council approved a contract Wednesday of $171,347 to hire consultant MGT of America of Tallahassee, Florida

Governor John Lynch says it’s a lot of money, but necessary to figure out which proposal is really the best deal.

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Environment
5:44 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

NOAA: Last Six Months Hottest on Record in NH

Flikr Creative Commons / trubh

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association released temperature data for the past six months on Monday. Reports that NOAA’s data shows this to be hottest first half of the year yet in the Granite state.

New Hampshire wasn’t the only state to break records: all told twenty-eight states had their hottest first six months on record, and for another 15 states the temperatures ranked in the all-time top-ten.

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National
10:41 am
Thu July 5, 2012

'Roller Skiing' Summer Training for Winter Athletes

Skiers at a camp for elite skiers in the North East practice their "double poling."
Sam Evans-Brown

Athletes all over the country are competing to secure their places on the Summer Olympics team. At the same time, Winter Olympians are doing what they can to stay in shape. For cross-country skiers, that means roller skiing. New Hampshire Public Radio's Sam Evans-Brown reports roller skiing has become a competition sport in its own right.

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Environment
5:36 pm
Tue July 3, 2012

White Nose Syndrome Found in Rockingham County for the First Time

USFWS Headquarters Flikr Creative Commons

Officials with New Hampshire Fish and Game have confirmed that bats infected with White Nose Syndrome have been detected in Rockingham County for the first time.

White nose was first detected on bats in Rockingham in 2010, but this March was the first time bats were visibly infected with the fungus. Fish and Game biologist Emily Brunkhurst says the disease has devastated bat populations in the Northeast.

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NH News
10:07 am
Mon July 2, 2012

Energy Efficiency Investment Slow to Catch On

Flikr Creative Commons / GraySky

A new report out from the New Hampshire Energy and Climate Collaborative finds that NH may not be doing enough to make homes more energy efficient.

Three years ago Governor John Lynch put forth his climate action plan, a roadmap for how to reduce the states carbon emissions. Number one on the list of strategies: maximize energy efficiency in buildings. But getting homeowners to invest in efficiency has been harder than policymakers had hoped.

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NH News
5:31 pm
Thu June 28, 2012

Supreme Court Gives Decision on ACA Medicaid Expansion to NH

Flikr Creative Commons / Fifth World Art

This is a closer look at the Supreme Court’s Ruling as it relates to Medicaid in the Granite State. Under the upheld law, an additional 17 million people nationwide are set to become eligible for Medicaid in 2014. That’s a 27 percent increase. The new threshold is $29,000 dollars a year for a family of four.

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NH News
5:57 pm
Wed June 27, 2012

N.H. Lawmakers Knock Down 7 of Lynch's Vetos, Uphold 6

Amanda Loder

Wednesday the New Hampshire House and Senate overrode seven of Gov. John Lynch’s vetoes and allowed six to stand.

The voting came rapid-fire in the Senate, which made it through seven of its own bills in the morning, and then waited for the House to work through its backlog in the afternoon. The House votes came at a statelier pace at first, but then picked up after lunch. At the end of the day seven of Lynch's vetoes were knocked down, and six allowed to stand.

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NH News
3:03 pm
Tue June 26, 2012

Gov. Candidates at Loggerheads on School Choice

On Wednesday, the legislature will vote on whether or not to override Governor John Lynch’s veto of a bill supporters call School Choice Scholarship Act.

Both Democratic gubernatorial candidates are calling on the legislature to uphold the governor’s veto. Their republican opponents came out in support of the school choice bill last week. There are two, nearly identical, versions of the education tax credit coming back before the legislature tomorrow.

At a campaign event Tuesday,  Maggie Hassan used the veto vote to lash out at one of her Republican opponents.

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Environment
4:49 pm
Fri June 22, 2012

What's in Your Water? High Arsenic in 1 in 5 NH Wells.

Wells in New Hampshire can contain any number of colorless, odorless chemicals. The three most common in descending order are Arsenic, Manganese and Radon.
Sam Evans-Brown

About 40 percent of New Hampshire residents get their drinking water from private wells. The Department of Environmental Services is encouraging well owners to test their water for arsenic, but unlike municipal water supplies, testing isn’t mandatory. And colorless, odorless contaminants abound in the Granite State.

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Environment
10:36 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Efforts to Restore Oyster Beds Could be a Stopgap Measure for Great Bay

Three-year-old oysters that were killed by one of two invasive European diseases
Sam Evans-Brown

 

The Nature Conservancy and the University of New Hampshire are working to restore oyster beds in the Great Bay. The organization hopes its efforts can help stave off an ecosystem collapse while towns in the watershed work toward upgrading their wastewater plants. 

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