Scott Detrow

Scott Detrow is a congressional correspondent for NPR. He also co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.

Detrow joined NPR in 2015 to cover the presidential election. He focused on the Republican side of the 2016 race, spending time on the campaign trail with Donald Trump, and also reported on the election's technology and data angles.

Detrow worked as a statehouse reporter for member stations WITF in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and KQED in San Francisco, California. He has also covered energy policy for NPR's StateImpact project, where his reports on Pennsylvania's hydraulic fracturing boom won a DuPont-Columbia and national Edward R. Murrow Award in 2013.

Detrow got his start in public radio at Fordham University's WFUV. He graduated from Fordham, despite spending most of his time in the newsroom, and also has a master's degree at the University of Pennsylvania's Fels Institute of Government.

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When Jessica Leeds was a traveling paper saleswoman in the late 1970s and early 1980s, she told herself that sexual harassment was just a fact of life.

"You didn't complain about that sort of thing," she told NPR in an interview Friday, which will air on All Things Considered.

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Comic book fans are familiar with the idea of the multiverse: alternate worlds very similar to ours but different enough for plots to come and go without affecting long-term story arcs.

Well, on the Earth-3 where Hillary Clinton is running for president against a traditional, disciplined Republican – and not a Donald Trump, who has declared civil war on other Republican leaders – WikiLeaks' decision to post Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta's private emails would be a major, major news story right now.

After a weekend where Indiana Gov. Mike Pence strongly rebuked running mate Donald Trump and refused to campaign for him — and after a debate where Trump undercut a Pence policy proposal on Syria — Pence made the cable news rounds Monday morning to praise Trump.

While dozens of Republican officeholders are calling on Donald Trump to step down as their party's presidential nominee, several key national leaders are, as of Sunday morning, holding their fire.

Both Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Speaker Paul Ryan have criticized and condemned the lewd and offensive statements that Trump was recorded saying to Access Hollywood in 2005, as has Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus.

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Now we're going to go to Colorado. That is where Donald Trump is today and where NPR's Scott Detrow is traveling with the campaign. Hi there, Scott.

SCOTT DETROW, BYLINE: Hey, Kelly.

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For most Americans, Election Day is November 8. Though starting today, voters in the key swing state of Iowa can cast their ballots. Iowa is one of many states providing the option of voting early.

At the end of Monday night's presidential debate, Hillary Clinton accused Donald Trump of taunting one of his former Miss Universe contestants about her weight.

Clinton said the Republican nominee's criticisms of Alicia Machado, a Venezuelan who won the Miss Universe contest in 1996, was "one of the worst things he said" about women. "He called this woman Miss Piggy. Then he called her Miss Housekeeping because she was Latina."

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has been making stark appeals for the African-American vote.

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Attempting to court black voters over the last two months, Donald Trump has painted a pretty dire picture of their lives. "You're living in poverty," he said in late August. "Your schools are no good. You have no jobs. Fifty-eight percent of your youth is unemployed. What the hell do you have to lose?"

On Tuesday Trump took this rhetoric one step further, telling a North Carolina audience that "our African-American communities are absolutely in the worst shape they've ever been in before. Ever, ever ever."

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On Friday, Donald Trump made a bold claim. He said Hillary Clinton is responsible for first raising questions about whether or not President Obama was born in the United States.

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After five years of speculation, insinuation and repeated false statements, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump now says he believes President Obama was born in the United States. NPR's Scott Detrow has more.

Donald Trump is lashing out against an African-American pastor who interrupted him Wednesday to chide him for campaigning in her Flint, Mich., church.

"Something was up," Trump told Fox and Friends on Thursday morning, calling the Rev. Faith Green Timmons a "nervous mess."

"I noticed she was so nervous when she introduced me," he said. "When she got up to introduce me she was so nervous, she was shaking. I said, wow, this is kind of strange. Then she came up. So she had that in mind, there's no question."

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Donald Trump is once again taking the fight to Democrats and Hillary Clinton.

During a week in which the Republican presidential nominee has been attacking Clinton for disparaging half of his supporters as "deplorables," Trump plans to roll out a new proposal that treads deep into the core issues that Clinton and other Democrats regularly campaign on: making child care more accessible and affordable.

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Donald Trump spent today working with fresh material to make his case against Hillary Clinton. He was largely quiet about Clinton's recent health issues but is pressing his opponent over these comments from a fundraiser Clinton held on Friday night.

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As Donald Trump has focused the messaging of his presidential campaign in recent weeks, he's centered on one key attack on Democrat Hillary Clinton: The suggestion that the Clinton Foundation was a pay-to-play front that enabled Hillary and Bill Clinton to trade government access and favors for money.

Mike Pence sat down in Henry Jones' barbershop in Norristown, Pa., Tuesday, during a campaign swing — and the media came along for the ride.

CNN streamed 20 minutes of silence and small talk on Facebook Live, as Pence got a trim. Watch it here:

Among the moments captured on camera:

Pence: You've been at this location since '92?

Jones: Yes

Pence: It's a good location

After looking in a mirror and proclaiming it a "great haircut — perfect," Pence applauded, then walked behind the chair to shake Jones' hand.

Would a President Donald Trump attempt to forcefully remove an estimated 11 million people from the United States?

Three days after Trump's campaign first hinted it was reconsidering walking back from a core campaign promise, the answer still isn't clear.

Rudy Giuliani and other Donald Trump surrogates are questioning Hillary Clinton's health, so Clinton opened a jar of pickles on them.

Jimmy Kimmel presented her with the challenge during an appearance Monday on his ABC late-night talk show. He also checked her pulse.

Clinton, 68, chalked the health rumors up to what she called the Trump campaign's "wacky strategy."

Is Donald Trump considering wavering on a key campaign promise?

That's what several news reports published over the weekend suggest. And while the Trump campaign issued a statement denying any shift on immigration policy, top surrogates and campaign operatives hinted that a change just might be on its way.

The issue: what to do with the estimated 11 million immigrants already living in the United States illegally.

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