Scott Detrow

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The Senate gathered this afternoon to say goodbye to Vice President Joe Biden. Biden has been a presence there for more than 40 years. And NPR's Scott Detrow says it was a rare bipartisan moment in an increasingly partisan Capitol.

Friday afternoon, four candidates for Democratic National Committee chair will gather in Denver to debate the future of the embattled party.

For Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison, the forum will be a chance to respond to a growing backlash against his bid to run the DNC.

Ellison appeared to be the early favorite when he entered the race. He earned endorsements from two powerful voices – Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and incoming Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer.

In a series of tweets Wednesday morning, President-elect Donald Trump tried to tamp down growing concerns that he will not separate his vast global business interests from his role as head of the U.S. government.

Trump is promising to hold a "major news conference" in two weeks to talk about how he's turning his empire over to his children.

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President-elect Donald Trump ran an insurgent, anti-establishment campaign, but the latest addition to his prospective Cabinet is about as establishment as it gets.

Elaine Chao, whom Trump picked Tuesday to head the Department of Transportation, worked in both Bush administrations, has ties to the conservative Heritage Foundation, has sat on numerous corporate boards and spent several years running the United Way of America. She also happens to be married to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

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I'm Ari Shapiro. Big changes today to Donald Trump's transition team - and here to talk with us about it - NPR's Scott Detrow. Hi, Scott.

SCOTT DETROW, BYLINE: Hey, Ari.

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It is hard to keep track of all the ways that today's election could make history.

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Hillary Clinton, if she wins, would come to be the first female president.

Newspaper endorsements have been few and far between for Donald Trump this year. Several traditionally conservative papers like The Dallas Morning News and The Cincinnati Enquirer endorsed Hillary Clinton or Libertarian Gary Johnson this year. Others declined to endorse a candidate at all.

Trump's latest newspaper endorsement, though, is something his campaign is making it very clear it does not want: The Crusader, a newspaper affiliated with the Ku Klux Klan, and that brands itself as "the premier voice of the white resistance."

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Donald Trump says something like this at nearly all of his rallies.

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DONALD TRUMP: There's 7,000 people outside. We're trying to get them in.

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This is what it sounds like two weeks before Election Day.

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DONALD TRUMP: This is bigger than me or any of us. It's about our country.

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As Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton shook hands with moderator Chris Wallace and greeted their families after the end of Wednesday night's presidential debate, the broadcast hosts delivered their verdict.

"All six of the 15-minute segments — total home runs for him," said Cliff Sims. "I think this was really the performance that Donald Trump needed to grab that momentum going toward the election."

His co-host, Boris Epshteyn, agreed: "He prosecuted the case against Hillary Clinton perfectly."

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Donald Trump is down in the polls. He has faced wave after wave of negative stories. And on the campaign trail and on Twitter, he is hitting one point over and over.

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When Jessica Leeds was a traveling paper saleswoman in the late 1970s and early 1980s, she told herself that sexual harassment was just a fact of life.

"You didn't complain about that sort of thing," she told NPR in an interview Friday, which will air on All Things Considered.

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Comic book fans are familiar with the idea of the multiverse: alternate worlds very similar to ours but different enough for plots to come and go without affecting long-term story arcs.

Well, on the Earth-3 where Hillary Clinton is running for president against a traditional, disciplined Republican — and not a Donald Trump, who has declared civil war on other Republican leaders — WikiLeaks' decision to post Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta's private emails would be a major, major news story right now.

After a weekend where Indiana Gov. Mike Pence strongly rebuked running mate Donald Trump and refused to campaign for him — and after a debate where Trump undercut a Pence policy proposal on Syria — Pence made the cable news rounds Monday morning to praise Trump.

While dozens of Republican officeholders are calling on Donald Trump to step down as their party's presidential nominee, several key national leaders are, as of Sunday morning, holding their fire.

Both Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Speaker Paul Ryan have criticized and condemned the lewd and offensive statements that Trump was recorded saying to Access Hollywood in 2005, as has Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus.

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Now we're going to go to Colorado. That is where Donald Trump is today and where NPR's Scott Detrow is traveling with the campaign. Hi there, Scott.

SCOTT DETROW, BYLINE: Hey, Kelly.

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When Election Day comes around in little more than a month from now, millions of Americans will have already voted. In fact, voting is already underway in key swing states like Iowa and North Carolina.

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For most Americans, Election Day is November 8. Though starting today, voters in the key swing state of Iowa can cast their ballots. Iowa is one of many states providing the option of voting early.

At the end of Monday night's presidential debate, Hillary Clinton accused Donald Trump of taunting one of his former Miss Universe contestants about her weight.

Clinton said the Republican nominee's criticisms of Alicia Machado, a Venezuelan who won the Miss Universe contest in 1996, was "one of the worst things he said" about women. "He called this woman Miss Piggy. Then he called her Miss Housekeeping because she was Latina."

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has been making stark appeals for the African-American vote.

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Attempting to court black voters over the last two months, Donald Trump has painted a pretty dire picture of their lives. "You're living in poverty," he said in late August. "Your schools are no good. You have no jobs. Fifty-eight percent of your youth is unemployed. What the hell do you have to lose?"

On Tuesday Trump took this rhetoric one step further, telling a North Carolina audience that "our African-American communities are absolutely in the worst shape they've ever been in before. Ever, ever ever."

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On Friday, Donald Trump made a bold claim. He said Hillary Clinton is responsible for first raising questions about whether or not President Obama was born in the United States.

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After five years of speculation, insinuation and repeated false statements, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump now says he believes President Obama was born in the United States. NPR's Scott Detrow has more.

Donald Trump is lashing out against an African-American pastor who interrupted him Wednesday to chide him for campaigning in her Flint, Mich., church.

"Something was up," Trump told Fox and Friends on Thursday morning, calling the Rev. Faith Green Timmons a "nervous mess."

"I noticed she was so nervous when she introduced me," he said. "When she got up to introduce me she was so nervous, she was shaking. I said, wow, this is kind of strange. Then she came up. So she had that in mind, there's no question."

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