Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith is a NPR White House Correspondent. She is especially focused on matters related to the economy and the Federal budget.

Prior to moving into her current role in January 2014, she was a Congressional Correspondent covering Congress with an emphasis on the budget, taxes and the ongoing fiscal fights. During the Republican presidential primaries she covered Herman Cain, Newt Gingrich in South Carolina, and traveled with Mitt Romney leading into the primaries in Colorado and Ohio, among other states. She began covering congress in August 2011.

Keith joined NPR in 2009 as a Business Reporter. In that role, she reported on topics spanning the business world from covering the debt downgrade and debt ceiling crisis to the latest in policy debates, legal issues and technology trends. In early 2010, she was on the ground in Haiti covering the aftermath of the country's disastrous earthquake and later she covered the oil spill in the Gulf. In 2011, Keith conceived and reported the 2011 NPR series The Road Back To Work, a year-long series featuring the audio diaries of six people in St. Louis who began the year unemployed and searching for work.

Keith has deep roots in public radio and got her start in news by writing and voicing essays for NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday as a teenager. While in college, she launched her career at NPR Member Station KQED's California Report, covering topics including agriculture and the environment. In 2004, Keith began working at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, where she reported on politics and the 2004 presidential campaign.

Keith went back to California to open the state capital bureau for NPR Member Station KPCC/Southern California Public Radio. In 2006, Keith returned to KQED, serving as the Sacramento-region reporter for two years.

In 2001, Keith began working on B-Side Radio, an hour-long public radio show and podcast that she co-founded, produced, hosted, edited, and distributed for nine years.

Over the course of her career Keith has been the recipient of numerous accolades, including an award for best news writing from the APTRA California/Nevada and a first place trophy from the Society of Environmental Journalists for "Outstanding Story Radio." Keith was a 2010-2011 National Press Foundation Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow.

Keith earned a bachelor's degree in Philosophy from University of California, Berkeley, and a master's degree at the UCB Graduate School of Journalism. Tamara is also a member of the Bad News Babes, a media softball team that once a year competes against female members of Congress in the Congressional Women's Softball game.

President Obama has ordered the intelligence community to conduct a "full review" of "malicious cyber activity" timed to U.S. elections, the White House said Friday. The review will go all the way back to the 2008 campaign when China was found to have hacked both the Obama and McCain campaigns , White House spokesman Eric Schultz said at a Friday press briefing. In the 2016 election, U.S. intelligence officials charged that Russia had interfered. In early October, they released a strongly...

There were moments when watching the Trump and Clinton campaigns discuss the election at the Campaign Managers Conference at the Harvard Institute of Politics was like watching The Jerry Springer Show without the chair-throwing (or paternity disputes). The 2016 campaign was an ugly, knock-down, drag-out fight between two different visions of America. So it was fitting that the typically polite and clinical quadrennial gathering of campaign professionals would erupt into shouting matches and...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: During the presidential campaign, Donald Trump refused to say that he would accept the results of the election if he lost. Well, Donald Trump won, and he's still not accepting the results. Yesterday, Trump tweeted a baseless claim that millions of people voted illegally and gave Hillary Clinton a lead in the popular vote, though the popular vote does not determine who wins the election. This comes amid an effort...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xX_KaStFT8 President-elect Donald Trump put out a video Monday night that gave an update on the transition process — and laid out some of his "policy plans for the first 100 days." Much of what Trump proposed wasn't new, from deregulation of the energy industry to a lobbying ban to tearing up the Trans-Pacific Partnership. It closely resembled the 100-day agenda he outlined in a speech he gave in October in Gettysburg, Pa. A couple of new, but nondetailed items...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sdd-pZ0LR0s As he campaigned for president, Donald Trump spoke favorably about using waterboarding, torture and "much stronger" techniques on terrorism suspects. But in addition to likely legal challenges if Trump attempts to bring those practices back, two prominent Republican senators signaled he could face opposition from within his own party. On Saturday, Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) got animated at the Halifax International Security Forum, when a moderator asked...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnW3xkHxIEQ Three days after winning the presidency in 2008, President-elect Barack Obama held a press conference, taking questions from reporters. Three days after winning the presidency in 2016, President-elect Donald Trump turned to Twitter. An unprecedented feature of Donald Trump's successful campaign for president was his personal use of Twitter and it has continued as Trump meets with advisers and potential members of his cabinet. If this continues into...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: President-elect Trump continues to be busy on Twitter. Last night on Twitter, he claimed credit for saving a Ford plant from being sent to Mexico, although Ford said it never had plans to move the plant to Mexico. In some ways, his activity on Twitter is in line with the tradition of presidents going around the so-called filter of the press. NPR's Tamara Keith reports. TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Three days after...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: It is of course election night. We should be getting the first results within an hour. And right now we're going to talk about how we got here. Donald Trump's unexpected rise to the top of the Republican Party has rocked the political system. We will have more on that elsewhere in the program. Now NPR's Tamara Keith has a look at how Hillary Clinton became the first female nominee of a major party and could...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: Election Day is finally here. People are voting across the country, and we will be here all night bringing you the results as they come in. For now we're going to talk about how we got here. Donald Trump's unexpected rise to the top of the Republican Party has rocked the political system. We will have more on that elsewhere in the program. Now NPR's Tamara Keith has a look at how Hillary Clinton became the first...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) DONALD TRUMP: We are going to win the great state of North Carolina. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) HILLARY CLINTON: Hello, Pittsburgh. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) TRUMP: Florida's my second home, a state I love so much. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) CLINTON: It is great to be back in Western Michigan. Thank you. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) TRUMP: Thank you, Pennsylvania. Thank you...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: But we want to turn now to the Clinton campaign. Hillary Clinton made a stop in Cleveland at a campaign event with NBA star LeBron James. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) HILLARY CLINTON: It really is a choice between division or unity, between an economy that works for everyone or one that is stacked for those at the top, between strong, steady leadership or a loose cannon. MARTIN: NPR's Tamara Keith has been...

When it comes to Hillary Clinton's historic run for the presidency, if she's ultimately able to shatter that highest, hardest glass ceiling it will be because a combination of good luck and better planning helped her overcome challenges, many of her own making. Donald Trump's name is on the ballot, but Clinton's biggest opponent may well have been herself — as she was dogged by emails, questions over the Clinton Foundation and paid speeches. Those controversies have kept the presidential...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sEqiNIPIPPQ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2m5T7Vlo0-A http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrX3Ql31URA http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHGPbl-werw http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=855Am6ovK7s One of Hillary Clinton's oft repeated attack lines against Donald Trump is that he's "a man you can bait with a tweet." It's now clear her campaign has been purposely baiting the Republican nominee with television ads. "You know, he was a big part of our target audience. He...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: The FBI's continuing inquiry into Hillary Clinton's private email server has cast a shadow over her campaign. Her most fervent supporters are undeterred, though. NPR's Tamara Keith caught up with some Clinton campaign volunteers in Las Vegas. TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Much has been made of the passion of Donald Trump supporters, but Clinton backers say their passion is real, too. Donna West has converted her east Las...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: And just a week ago, Hillary Clinton was looking to run up the score against Donald Trump. Her campaign was running ads in Texas and planning a trip to the traditionally red state of Arizona. Today, she heads out on that trip but under different circumstances. NPR's Tamara Keith reports. TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Hillary Clinton's campaign is launching new television ad buys in states she's supposed to have in the...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: FBI Director James Comey has created one last October surprise for this presidential election. He told Congress on Friday that the FBI is looking at more emails apparently related to Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server while she was secretary of state. It's not clear how this will impact the race, but it is the focus out on the campaign trail. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) DONALD TRUMP: That's the...

Hillary Clinton's campaign has been dealing with the fallout from her choice to use a private email server while secretary of state since before there was even officially a campaign. Now, WikiLeaks has released private emails from March 2015 between Clinton advisers talking about how to handle the email mess. Clinton's campaign says the email release is part of a Russian effort to interfere with the U.S. election. The campaign has chosen not to verify the authenticity of the emails hacked...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jrnRU3ocIH4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KN6W84ZvPo The men parked their white work van on a patch of dirt down the road from the college where Hillary Clinton was set to give a major speech. Then they attached a banner. It was almost as long as the van with bold red-and-black vinyl lettering. "Trump that bitch," it read. They waved and smiled, as people drove by. The message wasn't subtle. It also wasn't an outlier, either. It's a slogan that's been found on...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: For the third and final time tonight, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton will come face to face in a debate. Their last debate was perhaps the most unorthodox in memory, and since then, the tone of the campaign has gotten even more contentious. Several women have come forward and accused Trump of groping or kissing them without their consent, and emails released by the group WikiLeaks have led to almost daily...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Hillary Clinton's emails are making headlines again, this time with the release of documents from the FBI's investigation into her use of a private email server while secretary of state. Critics say those documents show an "extremely disturbing" effort to get classification markings changed and even a possible quid pro quo. The agencies involved deny that charge strenuously. The Republican chairmen of the House Oversight and House Intelligence committees have sent a letter to Secretary of...

Hillary Clinton, who has long been public enemy No. 1 for many in the Republican Party, is now making a direct appeal to Republican and independent voters turned off by Donald Trump. For months, her campaign has been courting these voters, but as Clinton and her team see it, the events of the past week have given them a much wider opening. Her Republican opponent, Donald Trump, is in open warfare with members of his own party and is still reeling from the release of a 2005 video where he...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR . ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: There's a panel of volunteer doctors whose decisions affect nearly everyone who has health insurance. They review scientific literature and pass judgment on preventive medical services. The panel is called the Preventive Services Task Force. Since the Affordable Care Act took effect in 2010, the panel's judgments have carried added weight. Insurance companies must now pay for the preventive tests or drugs the group recommends....

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Bill Clinton was at a rally in Michigan riffing about the American health care system, riffing being a favorite pastime of the former president. He was getting to a point about how his wife, Hillary Clinton, hopes to improve the Affordable Care Act. But before he could get there, he described "this crazy system" where under Obamacare millions more people have health coverage but some have seen "their premiums doubled and their coverage cut in half." Clinton topped it off with a line that...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: People on Twitter and elsewhere talked a lot about the body language of the presidential candidates during Monday's debate. And you could tell a lot by that body language. At one point, Hillary Clinton responded to extended remarks by Donald Trump with a smile and a much noticed shimmy of her shoulders. Yesterday on this program, one Georgia voter concluded she wanted him to say everything that he was saying. On...

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