Taylor Quimby

Senior Producer, Word of Mouth|Outside/In

Taylor Quimby started his career in radio in 2010 as a part-time board operator for NHPR. As Producer of Word of Mouth, he cultivates ideas, writes and produces segments, shapes the sound of the program, and sifts through endless emails. Taylor also lends his voice to the show as an occasional substitute host and contributor, and is responsible for the blog Abbrev. Movie Reviews.

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Bodo Schrader was just a baby when his mother was taken to Auschwitz, and four when the concentration camp where he was being held was liberated.  

While many Holocaust survivor stories are first-person narratives told from memory, time and trauma have prevented Bodo from accessing the details of his own history.

For the past two years, Bodo's daughter Margot has taken on the tasks of researching his past. Today on Word of Mouth, Bodo and Margot talk about their shared journey.

Bill via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/2kFWk

One of New Hampshire's most sought-after animals is the moose - a giant mammal somehow able to straddle the line between majestic, and absurd-looking, with big blunt noses and comparatively spindly legs.

But beloved or not, moose aren't always easy to spot. This story from our Only in NH series sets out to answer questions submitted by listeners. This one is from Sean, who asks “Where is the best place to look for moose?”

Producer Taylor Quimby is on the case.

wine4food.com

It is that time of year when Honeycrisp apples are abundant, orchards are packed with families, and the leaves are just starting to turn. And one of the best ways to celebrate the onset of fall is indulging in New England’s seasonal food traditions.

But when it comes to regional foods, what is quintessentially New Hampshire, and what’s just New England-y? 

NHPR Staff

It's been fourteen years since the Old Man of the Mountain collapsed, but New Hampshire residents are still used to seeing him all over the state. One of listeners is asking, "Why?"

As part of our series Only in NH, in which we answer questions from around the state about New Hampshire oddities, producer Taylor Quimby tries to get to the bottom of that question.

Via the NH State Parks Blog

When we started asking for questions from our listeners about the state, we got pages and pages of submissions online; so many we couldn’t answer them all. 

So I combed through and picked one that sounded interesting to me. And that’s how I ended up calling a woman named Jen, and asking one of the stupidest questions I’ve ever asked.

Taylor Quimby for NHPR

If you’ve visited the grocery store beer aisle lately, you might have noticed a growing number of beer options, many of them brewed right here in New Hampshire.

These hoppy IPAs, porters, and session ales are all part of the craft beer movement.

Taylor Quimby / NHPR

For nearly a decade, Peterborough NH has hosted *broke: The Affordable Arts Fair. It’s a refuge where frugal or budget-conscious art aficionados get connected with local artists and makers who are offering their wares for fifty dollars or less. The arts fair is part of Peterborough’s annual music festival, The Thing In The Spring, and it kicks off this year on June 10th.

 

Up until July of 2013, Word of Mouth was broadcast live, and therefore subject to the occasional mishaps and misfortunes of live radio–dropped calls, nervous interviewees, and the occasional technical bumble.

During that time, I was the program’s primary director–it was up to me to make quick calls about when to drop a guest, keep an ear out for the pace of the program, and figure out what to do when things weren’t going the way we had planned.

I’ll be the first to tell you that my job is much less stressful now that we tape our segments and edit them before the show airs (and we’ll never have a dropped call again) but I learned a great deal about making radio during that time.

Here are a few of my favorite “failed” interviews from when Word of Mouth was broadcast live, and the lessons they imparted.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

As David McCullough says, "history in the hands of Stacy Schiff is invariably full of life, light, shadow, surprise, clarity of insight... Few writers combine as she does superb scholarship and an exceptional gift for language with amazing reach and agility of mind. "

Schiff, a Pulitizer Prize-winning author and historian, joined us at The Music Hall in Portsmouth for our program Writers on a New England Stage, to talk about her newest book, The Witches: Salem, 1692.

: Map by Steve Bushey and Angela Faeth, with added notes by Taylor Quimby

In 1934, a weather observer stationed at the peak of Mount Washington recorded a, then record, wind gust of 231 miles per hour. As a point of reference, that’s in the same neighborhood as an F5 tornado.

Even on hot summer day, conditions at the peak can drop below freezing in a matter of minutes – which is just one reason more than 135 people have died in the shadow of Mount Washington since 1859.

And yet, Mount Washington isn’t just Home of the World’s Worst Weather--as a sign at the summit famously boasts--it’s also home to a weather station, where a team of researchers are able to safely live year-round.

Which begs the question: would the Mount Washington Observatory be the perfect place to survive a zombie apocalypse?

Listen to this radio story to find out:

www.flickr.com/photos/fhgitarre/

It's official - 2015's song of the summer is "Cheerleader" by OMI. So now that horse race is over, what about an anthem for Autumn? And how do you even make that choice?

If a summer song needs to be fun, upbeat, and sound good blasting from car windows at Hampton Beach, what qualities define a memorable fall tune?  Pumpkin-related lyrics?  Wistful melodies, and acoustic guitars?  We asked three music industry insiders to tell us what they think 2015's (Unofficial) Song of the Fall should be and why -  and here's what they had to say.

Credit Dr. Seuss Collection in the Mandeville Special Collections Library at UCSD / bit.ly/1DQg5PW

While you’re probably familiar with The Lorax, The Cat in the Hat, Green Eggs & Ham, and the dozens of other world-famous Seuss books, there is one chapter of Geisel’s professional history that remains relatively unknown.  Before he was world famous for his children’s books, Dr. Seuss employed his rich imagination and skillful illustrations for another purpose- convincing Americans to go to war.

Jana Brooks / facebook.com/theknightshall

With the Medieval Combat World Championships just around the corner, Jaye Brooks, senior instructor and owner of The Knights Hall, doesn’t want to risk any late-in-the game injuries. Usually his men would be practicing judo throws and boxing drills while wearing sixty to eighty pounds of armor. Today, they take turns beating on car tires with two-handed axes, swords, and maces.   

Sara Plourde / NHPR

  

Sara Plourde / NHPR

When Executive Chancellor Jones mentioned she'd be "all ears" if someone were to work on a fight song for Oaksterdam, we saw that as an opportunity. 

Watch the Dartmouth Glee Club sing the fight song producer Taylor Quimby came up with for Oaksterdam, with a whole lot of music-writing help from the group's director, Louis Burkot.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

  The Science of Superheroes

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Video Games & History

Sara Plourde/ NHPR

The American Vacation

“Vacations were an important part of the social life of the upper class in the United States throughout the 19th century.   They even had a circuit of vacations that followed the sun in some ways – they went south for the winter, came back north to Newport and other places like that. In fact, they became what  Thorstein Veblen critiqued as ‘the leisure class.’  It’s not until the turn of the 20th century that the middle class begins to see vacations as something that’s possible for them.” 

Paul Burnett and Clint McMahon via Flickr Creative Commons

Wherever you live, whatever you’re into, human beings respond to music. Brain researchers have found that listening to music not only makes you feel good – it alters your brain physiologically. To find out more we, talked to Dr. Robert Zatorre,  Neuroscientist at the Montreal Neurological Institute at McGill University.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Zombies In Popular Media

“I like the philosophical questions the best, so the zombie movies that really challenge us to think about how we react to other people and what it means to be part of community are really useful. In that regard, I like Invasion of the Body Snatchers quite a bit. We’ll also use a Showtime movie from 2006 called Zombie Honeymoon, which is really great. The production values aren’t fantastic, but the movie has a lot of meat to chew on, so to speak.”

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Introduction to Turfgrass Management,  Golf Course Design and Construction , Turfgrass management and Irrigation, & Golf Course Management

“There is a split between students that like to play golf and students interested in horticulture, but I think that sometimes there’s a blend of both.  I think that it is important to be able to play golf, to understand the rules and the concerns of the players.”

Sara Plourde / NHPR

The Uncommon Core is a series that examines unusual college courses being taught in schools across the United States. In this episode, a professor explains how our beauty pageants can tell us a lot about who we are as a culture.

How to Win a Beauty Pageant: Race, Gender, Culture, and U.S. National Identity

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Invented Languages: Klingon and Beyond

“I wanted to start teaching this course because I wanted a way to engage students in linguistics without having to actually teach them linguistics.  I wanted a kind of pop-culture back road into linguistics.  Also I’m a huge Star Trek fan.”

In our monthly segment "On Demand," we help improve your movie nights by offering suggestions for films that are currently streaming on Netflix Instant.   This month, we thought we’d do something a little different.  Just in time for Thanksgiving, here are five classic films about family that you wouldn’t exactly call “family films.”  If you’re gearing up for a visit from your own eccentric relatives, this queue will remind you that it could be a lot worse.

Things That Should Never Get Pumpkin Spiced

Oct 21, 2014

Whether you love or hate the pumpkin spice trend that is rampant this time of year, it seems the marketplace is finding an increasingly large number of ways to incorporate the flavor of fall into nearly all ingestible products. We had planned to give our own top five weirdest pumpkin flavored products, but then we realized that virtually everything has a seasonal pumpkin slant these days. Instead, we present to you: Things That Should NEVER Get Pumpkin Spiced. We encourage you to submit your own.

Here's a few that didn't make the fancy poster:

1. Pumpkin Tuna

Picking out a movie can be a lot like browsing the cereal aisle - the more options you have, the harder it is to decide what to watch.  It's especially difficult for subscription-based services like Netflix and Amazon Prime, which offer you more programming than you can even browse in one sitting. In our monthly segment "On Demand", we help make your movie nights memorable by offering our favorite movies and shows being made available this month.

Picking out a movie can be a lot like browsing the cereal aisle - the more options you have, the harder it is to decide what to watch. It's especially difficult for subscription-based services like Netflix and Amazon Prime, which offer you more programming than you can even browse in one sitting. In our monthly segment "On Demand", we help make your movie nights memorable by offering our favorite movies and shows being made available this month.

Picking out a movie can be a lot like browsing the cereal aisle - the more options you have, the harder it is to decide what to watch.  It's especially difficult for subscription-based services like Netflix and Amazon Prime, which offer you more programming than you can even browse in one sitting. In our monthly segment "On Demand", we help make movie night memorable by offering our favorite films and shows being made available this month.

Myspace. The velvet leisure suit of social media.  Fewer than six short years ago, MySpace boasted more members than Facebook.  Today, you’ll be hard pressed to find anybody who admits to having an account. The thing is, you know lots of people who have a MySpace profile – but many of them haven’t logged in for years.  You might even be one of them.

Picking out a movie can be a lot like browsing the cereal aisle - the more options you have, the harder it is to decide what to watch.  It's an especially difficult process for subscription-based services like Netflix and Amazon Prime, which offer you more programming than you can even browse in one sitting. As if that wasn't hard enough, these services are constantly adding and removing dozens of titles with little to no warning. In our monthly segment "On Demand", we  aim to help you make your movie nights memorable by offering our favorite movies and shows being made available this month. 

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