Tom Goldman

Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and NPR.org.

With a beat covering the entire world of professional sports, both in and outside of the United States, Goldman reporting covers the broad spectrum of athletics from the people to the business of athletics.

During his more than 20 years with NPR, Goldman has covered every major athletic competition including the Super Bowl, the World Series, the NBA Finals, golf and tennis championships, and the Olympic Games.

His pieces are diverse and include both perspective and context. Goldman often explores people's motivations for doing what they do, whether it's solo sailing around the world or pursuing a gold medal. In his reporting, Goldman searches for the stories about the inspirational and relatable amateur and professional athletes.

Goldman contributed to NPR's 2009 Edward R. Murrow award for his coverage of the 2008 Beijing Olympics and to a 2010 Murrow award for contribution to a series on high school football, "Friday Night Lives." Earlier in his career, Goldman's piece about Native American basketball players earned a 2004 Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award from the Center for the Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University and a 2004 Unity Award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association.

In January 1990, Goldman came to NPR to work as an associate producer for sports with Morning Edition. For the next seven years he reported, edited and produced stories and programs. In June 1997, he became NPR's first full time sports correspondent.

For five years before NPR, Goldman worked as a news reporter and then news director in local public radio. In 1984, he spent a year living on an Israeli kibbutz. Two years prior he took his first professional job in radio in Anchorage, Alaska, at the Alaska Public Radio Network.

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Major college sports programs could take a significant step today toward sharing their wealth with the student-athletes whose performances help line their coffers.

The NCAA Board of Directors is expected to vote this afternoon on a plan to restructure Division I athletics, which would give the five biggest athletic conferences autonomy in making certain rules and provide so-called enhanced benefits to student-athletes.

Host country Brazil was eliminated from the World Cup in epic fashion: Germany defeated Brazil 7-1 during the semifinal match. Brazilians are wondering how their beloved team could be so pulverized.

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In Brazil, tears of joy and relief as the World Cup home team won its quarterfinal against Colombia.

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SIEGEL: Brazil beat Colombia 2-1 in a hard-fought game between the two South American neighbors, but as we'll hear, it was a costly victory. An earlier game today - Germany defeated France 1-nothing to move on to the World Cup final four. NPR's Tom Goldman is in Rio de Janeiro, and he joins us now. And, Tom, first of all, Brazil won. But in a way, it also lost. Tell us about that.

The U.S. men's soccer team is out of the World Cup. For 90 minutes, the score was tied at 0-0, but the team lost in extra time to Belgium on Tuesday, 2-1.

The U.S. men's soccer team moves on to the World Cup's round of 16. They lost to Germany, but advance because Portugal beat Ghana. The team will get to rest a bit before playing Belgium on Tuesday.

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Brazil and Croatia face off in the first game of the 2014 World Cup. Organizers hope the start of the tournament directs attention back on the field and away from the problems in preparation.

The World Cup begins Thursday in Brazil. The U.S. team has its first match against Ghana the following week, the start of the so called "group of death."

Fifty years ago this week, teenager Jim Ryun of Wichita, Kan., ran a mile in under four minutes, the first high school boy to break the mythical barrier. But in the past few decades, the mile as a racing distance has fallen out of favor.

Ryan Lamppa is trying to bring it back.

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Tonight kicks off one of the biggest events on the NFL calendar, but there will be not one tackle made or touchdown thrown at Radio City Music Hall in New York City. Instead, just a guy in a suit, stepping up to a microphone every few minutes and saying the name of a college football player soon to be a professional football player. It is the start of the annual NFL draft, which will stretch into the weekend. And depending on your point of view, it's either Christmas in May, or an over-hyped non-event.

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The Donald Sterling case is far from over. Yes, the NBA has banned the L.A. Clippers' owner for life and the pro-basketball playoffs have continued. But Sterling has not revealed what he will do after being banned from the league for making racist remarks. He is expected to fight the forced sale of his team and that could have significant consequences.

NPR's Tom Goldman reports.

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The NBA has scheduled a big announcement for this afternoon. They'll address the allegations against Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling. He's accused of going on a racist rant, all caught on an audio tape made public Friday. The situation has infuriated people in the NBA and also elsewhere. It's certainly become a major distraction for the Clippers, who are trying to focus on basketball.

Controversy is swirling around racist comments allegedly made by Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling. The NBA is exploring its potential responses as it investigates the allegations.

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