12.7.16: Mexican Justice, Politeness Expert, & Overheard

Dec 7, 2016

When foreign nationals commit a crime in the US, their consulates work to avoid what the majority of UN member states consider to be barbaric: execution. Today, we'll hear what the government south of the border is doing to their nationals off death row.

Pursuing Justice From Mexico

US citizens imprisoned abroad often become causes. Their families and citizens groups lobby for leniency. US government officials work to free them, or failing that, ensure that they receive due process, be treated fairly in court and if convicted, that the punishment they receive fits the crime. 

When foreign nationals commit a crime in the United States, their consulates work to avoid what the vast majority of UN member states consider to be barbaric: execution. A Mexican government program has paid millions of dollars to American lawyers for tracking and assisting Mexican nationals charged in death penalty cases here in the United States.

The Marshall Project's Maurice Chammah wrote about the Mexican capital legal assistance program: How Mexico Saves Its Citizens from the Death Penalty in the US

You can listen to this story again here

The Politeness Expert

There can be something suspicious about a person who shows genuine interest in another with no clear motive. What's the angle?  After all, our culture pays more attention to online rants than compliments and rewards snarky opinions on Twitter with followers.

Paul Ford prides himself on being polite. He is a founding partner of the software company, post light, and host of the tech-based podcast, Track Changes. We found his manifesto, How To Be Polite, on the Medium website.

Plus, the NHPR staff talks about the polite social conventions we wish we could do away with. 

You can listen to this story again here

Overheard: December

And it's time for Overheard - our regular segment where we share the intriguing, moving, baffling, and frequently hilarious audio we come across. This week's picks come from NHPR reporter Todd Bookman and producers Jimmy Gutierrez and Molly Donahue.