3.17.15: Fan Fiction's Power Play, The Demise Of The Charity Race, & Fact Checking The Family

Mar 17, 2015

Credit jeffrey james pacres via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/62168f

Once relegated to fanzines and the occasional bookstore, “fan fiction” is quickly becoming more accessible, more mainstream, and in some cases, more of a headache for authors who inspired the fans in the first place. On today’s show, why some authors are bucking against the trend.

Then, the days of the charity 5k may be over. Despite an improving economy, many of the biggest charity races are reporting drops in participation and funds raised. We’ll find out why adventure races like Tough Mudder may be to blame.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments. 

The Rise of Fan Fiction

  • We’ll discuss the sometimes rocky relationship between authors and fan fiction with Laura Miller. Her essay “You Belong to Me” is in the latest issue of New York Magazine

The Origins of St. Patrick's Day

  • Here in the U.S., St. Patrick’s Day is all about parades, shamrocks, green beer, and Kiss Me I’m Irish buttons, but how do the real Irish celebrate the holiday? Maeve Conran brings us this story from Dublin.
  • You can listen to this story again at PRX.org.

Five Songs for St. Patrick's Day

  • We asked for your suggestions for an essential St. Patrick's Day playlist. Listen here and add your suggestion to our Facebook page.

The Demise of the Charity Race

Power of Half

  • It’s one thing to go out and run a 5k or a half-marathon for a good cause – but for one family, charitable giving is something that starts at home. Philip Graitcer has the story of the Salwens, who decided the best way to make a difference in the world was to downsize from a seven-bedroom home to something a little more manageable. 
  • You can listen to this story again at PRX.org.

Fact Checking Your Family's Social Media Posts

  • The writer, blogger and social media strategist Lyz Lenz decided to check out some of the links her family shared on social media to find out what was fact and what was fiction. Her article, “Fact-Checking Grandma” appeared on Aeon