5.24.16: Why Doesn't the Media Cover "X", Mately, & White House Photographers

May 24, 2016

Among the complaints about the presidential campaign on social media or talking with friends: how come the mainstream media never covers this candidate, those facts, that scandal. Today, is the media really dropping the ball?

Then, last fall, the aids health foundation launched a billboard campaign in Los Angeles linking mobile dating apps like Tinder and Grindr to the spread of STDs. The foundation charged that these apps are making casual sex as easily available as ordering a pizza. Now a start-up called Mately is banking that online daters will pay a premium to know the sexual history of their potential hook-ups

Listen to the full show. 

Why Doesn't the Media Cover "X"?

If you're reading about the presidential campaign on Twitter, or Facebook, or just speaking to others just about anywhere in America right now, you've probably heard or read some version of this sentence: how come the mainstream media isn't covering this scandal, this outrage, these crowds, this candidate, this platform?  You fill in the blank. 

Callum Borchers is a reporter for the Washington Post. He compiled a list of allegedly ignored stories and published them under this heading: "Here Are Those Presidential Campaign Stories That The Media 'Never' Covers."  We wanted to know why there seems to be such a gap between journalists and news consumers about what is being reported on...so we invited him on the show.

The Dating App That Discloses STDs

Last fall, the AIDS Health Foundation launched a billboard campaign in Los Angeles linking mobile dating apps like Tinder and Grindr to the spread of STDs and offering free screenings. In a statement, the foundation charged that location-based apps are becoming - quote - a digital bathhouse for Millennials, where the next encounter can be just a few feet away - along with an STD. 

A start-up called Mately, is banking that online daters will pay a premium to know the sexual history of their potential hook-ups - and be willing to share their status online as well. Steven Blum wrote about the Mately app for Broadly.

The Life of a White House Photographer

The life of a US President is a guarded one. From the moment they're elected to the hour of their death, they get 24/7 Secret Service protection. Access is restricted for their safety, but it also limits the public from seeing what their real life is like - behind the scenes. The White House presidential photographer gives us a glimpse.

We wanted to learn more about the history of following the president with a camera, so we turned to Michael Martinez,  a photojournalist and assistant professor at the School of Journalism and Electronic Media at the University of Tennessee.

 

Beers and dinner with Anthony Bourdain last night in Hanoi. @anthonybourdain

A photo posted by Pete Souza (@petesouza) on

May 23, 2016 at 7:33pm PDT

MGM Lion

Film studios all have signature logos to start of their movies. Paramount's - that ring of stars around a snow capped peak - is the oldest surviving Hollywood film logo. Pixar shows an animated desk lamp that hops into the frame and becomes the letter "I" in the name. Producer  Nate DiMeo from the podcast The Memory Palace brings us the history of MGM's roaring logo.

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