6.25.15: The Lost Art of Surrender & Still Dreaming

Jun 25, 2015

“From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever…” from Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce to General Lee, the act of surrender has a noble past. We look at the history of surrender in warfare and discover why waving the white flag has become increasingly rare. Then, we talk to two filmmakers who set up cameras at an assisted living facility for artists whose performing days are far behind them. Their new documentary follows the cast of residents as they rehearse for a public performance of a Shakespearean classic. 

Listen to the full show. 

The Lost Art of Surrender

Carlin Romano is a critic-at-large for the Chronicle of Higher Education, where we found his article “Whatever Happened to Surrender?”

SPLC on Hate Groups

Mark Potok is a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center. We spoke with him earlier this year about a study published by the SPLC that found a surge in hateful activity online. 

 

Still Dreaming

Filmmakers Jilann Spitzmiller and Hank Rogerson joined us to speak about their new film Still Dreaming, which will be shown in this Friday at the Hop, the Hopkins Center for the Arts, followed by a discussion with the filmmakers. There will also be a showing on July 1st at Pentangle in Woodstock, Vermont. 

Grandma Luge Takes Up Archery

Anne Abernathy doesn’t do half-measures. After college, she worked as a professional singer all across the country – then she picked up the sport of luge, and has since qualified for the Olympics a record six times.  Now in her sixties, Anne isn’t ready to retire – in fact she’s taken up a new challenge.  Producer Lauren Ober has the story.

You can listen to the story again at PRX.org