9.22.15: Ad Blockers, Yankees Suck, & Sao Paulo Underground

Sep 23, 2015

With every internet search come the annoying ads…popping up to obscure your view, streaming sound, or moving around distractingly in the corner. But can the internet survive without them? Today, what a new wave of ad blockers will mean for the future of the internet. Then, for a long time, being a Red Sox fan was to be an outsider, hardcore. That hard living, punk attitude motivated a group of teenagers to produce the most popular, and aggressive, T-shirt in Boston history. We’ll hear the Hollywood-worthy story behind the “Yankees Suck” t-shirt.

Listen to the full show. 

Ad Blockers and the Future of the Internet

As ads have increased so has the desire to be free of them...more and more programmers have been developing software to help consumers block these ads. Rob Fleischman is principal engineer at Akamai and our chief explainer of all things wired. He joined us to give us a primer on ad-blockers and find out what their proliferation means for the internet as we know it.

Turn On Your Love Light

There are a lot of inventions that make people more beautiful to others: orthodontics…alcohol…Spanx. Then there’s a little dial on most household walls that may have done more to change our mood and improve our self-image than any other, and done so very quietly. Todd Bookman has the back story to one of the great American inventions.

You can find out more about the history of the dimmer switch here

"Yankees Suck!"

Amos Barshad is Staff Writer for Grantland, where he wrote about the rise and fall of the drug-fueled, violent, and highly lucrative empire behind the once ubiquitous “Yankees Suck” t-shirt.

Sao Paulo Underground

Even as the nights get colder, one band is bringing Brazil to the Seacoast. Rob Mazurek, Mauricio Takara, and Guilherme Granado form the trio Sao Paulo Underground, which links Chicago's creative music scene to some of Brazil's best experimental musicians. You can see them live at 3S Artspace, tomorrow, September 24th.