Hillary Clinton Returns To Detroit After Second Presidential Debate

Oct 10, 2016
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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton were back campaigning today. Both had something to say about that debate last night.

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HILLARY CLINTON: Well, you never saw anything like that before.

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DONALD TRUMP: We had a lot of fun, and I would say that Hillary's highly overrated.

SHAPIRO: We'll hear more about Donald Trump's campaign stops in a moment. First we're joined by NPR's Tamara Keith in Detroit, Mich., where Hillary Clinton spoke this afternoon. Hi, Tam.

TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Hi.

SHAPIRO: So Donald Trump lashed out at Hillary Clinton last night in the debate, confronting her over her husband's sexual improprieties, threatening to put her in jail over her use of a private email server when she was secretary of state. What is Clinton saying about all this today?

KEITH: Well, the Clinton campaign says that it was a very tough debate, but it was what they expected. They say that at this point, Donald Trump has gone nuclear, and it's not sure what he can do next or what he got from it other than solidifying his base.

They are encouraged by the first big poll that's come out since that Trump tapes were released, showing that her lead has grown massively. And Clinton at a rally in Detroit today talking about the debate said Trump spent his time attacking when he should have been apologizing.

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CLINTON: We now know who Donald Trump is, but the real question for us is, who are we, right? I would argue we are not who he is.

KEITH: And she's really trying to make a more positive turn here, trying to appeal to Republican and independent voters who've maybe been turned off by some of the rhetoric at the debate and beyond. And the campaign is out today with four new ads featuring Republicans talking about why they're voting for her, not Trump.

SHAPIRO: Clinton is also dealing with WikiLeaks posting emails that appear to be by her campaign chairman, John Podesta. What have we learned from those emails, and what does the campaign have to say about them?

KEITH: Well, in part what we've learned from those emails is that Hillary Clinton said behind closed doors talking to Wall Street banks and others some of the things that people maybe assumed she was saying - support of free trade, for instance, willingness to hold public and private positions while negotiating.

But one senior campaign adds - aide says that they really have no apprehension about a further release of emails. They're not worried about a bombshell.

SHAPIRO: NPR's Tamara Keith in Detroit, Mich., where Hillary Clinton campaigned earlier today. Thanks, Tam.

KEITH: You're welcome. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.