Infographic: Spice Overdose Cases Since 2010

Sep 5, 2014

New Hampshire lawmakers say they’re thinking outside the criminal code when it comes to the designer drug known as Spice and may consider consumer protection laws such as labeling requirements.

A study committee met for the second time Thursday to look into ways to create a statewide approach to banning the substance, which has proven to be a challenge through conventional legislation.

A report by the State Police Forensic Lab shows that although many of these substances have been reformulated to skirt past laws, illegal substances are still prevalent. They further discovered that chemical compounds can vary from packet to packet even within the same package designs.

Governor Maggie Hassan declared a state of emergency on August 14th after more than 40 individuals reportedly suffered severe side effects after smoking the substance.

That declaration expired this week as authorities have not seen any more serious medical issues arise.

Stores in Manchester have voluntarily removed all brands of the drug from shelves and three stores closed by the city were required to pledge against any future sales before being allowed to reopen.

While the chemicals in Spice are produced abroad, the application to dried plant material, packaging and distribution is happening largely in the U.S., according to authorities. And investigations are ongoing in to the local supply line as part of the efforts to stem the flow.