The Las Vegas Shooting: Granite Staters Respond

Oct 2, 2017

It's been called the worst mass shooting in modern American history.  On Sunday evening, a gunman opened fire on an outdoor concert festival  in Las Vegas, killing at least 58 people and injuring many more. Some of the stories surrounding the massacre are eerily familiar: Family members of the gunman express shock upon hearing about the attack; victims describe feelings of disbelief as scenes of mayhem and horror engulfed them.   Yet this attack also surpassed others in terms of numbers killed and injured.  We'll take your questions and comments as details of this latest mass shooting continue to emerge. 


GUESTS:

  • Gerri King - Social psychologist and organizational consultant, and founding partner of Human Dynamics Associates.
  • Perry Plummer - Director of the N.H. Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. He was appointed director in 2013.
  • James Ramsay - Coordinator of the Homeland Security Program and professor of security studies at UNH. He has 20 years of experiences in the fields of public health, emergency management, occupational safety, environmental health and security.
  • U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen - Former three-term Governor of New Hampshire, Shaheen was first elected to the U.S. Senate in 2008. She was reelected in 2014.  Her committee assignments include: Armed Services and  Foreign Relations. 
  • Leeane Tigert -  Hospice Care Manager for the Concord Regional Visiting Nurse Association. She supervises chaplains and social workers in bereavement and patient care. She's also a pastoral psychotherapist and ordained minister. 

Related Reading:

"The evolutionary psychology behind mass shootings," from CNN. 

"How Do You Talk To Kids About Violence In The News?" by Vermont Public Radio. 

Additional Resources:

"Recovering Emotionally From Disaster," from the American Psychological Association. 

"Help Your Children Manage Distress in the Aftermath of a Shooting," from the American Psychological Association. 

"Resources for Coping with Tragic Mass Shootings," from Clinical Psychology Associates of North Central Florida.