When Alzheimer's Strikes Young

Apr 20, 2018

A recent Concord Monitor series, "Stolen Memories," profiles several Granite Staters who were diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer's, some in their early fifties.  We'll hear their stories and learn about their particular struggles with work, family, and the medical system. 

GUESTS:

  • Brenda Bouchard - A Madbury resident who lost her husband to early-onset Alzheimer's disease, and whose mother also has Alzheimer's.  She serves on the board of the Massachusetts/New Hampshire chapter of the Alzheimer's Association.
  • Robert Santulli - Physician, Honorary Professor of Psychiatry with the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, and Visiting Associate Professor for the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Dartmouth. He is the former director of the Dartmouth Memory Clinic. 
  • Leah Willingham - Reporter for The Concord Monitor, whose recent series,  "Stolen Memories,"  covered how families and patients cope with younger onset Alzheimer's.  

For all kinds of help with this disease -- including care planning services, education programs, and other resources, at no cost -- contact the Alzheimer's Association. Their Helpline, 800-272-3900, is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  

Cognitive Decline in New Hampshire

According to the 2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System:

  • In N.H., 8.9 percent of those aged 45 and over report they are experiencing confusion or memory loss that is happening more often or is getting worse.
  • More than half of them have not talked to a health care professional about it. 
  • For those with worsening memory problems, 42.8 percent say it has created "functional difficulties" -- that is, caused them to give up day-to-day activities  and/or interfered with work or social activities. 
  • 29.9 percent of those with memory problems live alone.

More Information on Alzheimer's Disease

10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer's.

2018 Facts and Figures on Alzheimer's. 

Bi-partisan legislation introduced called "BOLD" (Building Our Largest Dementia) Infrastructure