Here and Now

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  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

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Public Radio's daily news magazine bringing up-to-date midday news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Chvrches started out humble enough. A few singles hitting the Internet, some online buzz and a debut album recorded in a basement.

Less than four years later, however, and the band is massive – headlining summer festival stops the past two years across the country, while playing more than 350 shows.

Earlier this year Planet Fitness canceled a woman’s membership after she complained that a transgender woman’s presence in the locker room made her feel unsafe. She’s now suing the gym chain. Planet Fitness says it was not her complaint that led to the decision, but her showing up three days in a row to warn other customers about “a man in the locker room.”

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz declared on Fox News Sunday his candidacy for speaker of the House of Representatives. He is now the third Republican to vie for the seat, along with Majority Leader Kevin O. McCarthy of California and Rep. Daniel Webster of Florida.

Chaffetz’s announcement comes one week after Speaker John Boehner announced he was stepping down at the end of October. NPR’s lead political editor Domenico Montanaro joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to talk about the process of selecting a new speaker of the House.

Cancer was once referred to as “The Big C.” Then along came another C. A miracle, really, for so many: chemotherapy. It attacked cancers, prevented them from spreading, and helped so many people into remission. But, of course, it also has debilitating side effects.

Now, a landmark study, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute and published in the New England Journal of Medicine, finds that many women with early stage breast cancer can skip chemotherapy and do just fine.

A collection of stringed instruments, largely silent for seven decades, is giving voice to the horrors of the Holocaust. The “Violins of Hope” were once owned by the inmates of Nazi concentration camps and are now part of a three-month exhibit that opens today in Cleveland. David C. Barnett from Here & Now contributor WCPN has the story behind the violins.

Computer models are now showing a shrinking likelihood that Joaquin will make landfall in the U.S., even as the hurricane batters the Bahamas with heavy winds, rain and coastal flooding. The National Hurricane Center says the Category 4 storm is “extremely dangerous.”

Official: At Least 7 Dead, 20 Hurt In Oregon Shooting

Oct 1, 2015

A gunman opened fire at an Oregon community college Thursday, killing at least seven people and wounding 20, authorities said.

The shooting happened at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, about 180 miles south of Portland. The local fire district advised people via Twitter to stay away from the school. It later tweeted that there were “multiple casualties” but did not elaborate.

Among the most heard and least recognized players at the United Nations General Assembly session these last two weeks were the interpreters.

A Radio Free Europe journalist once referred to the annual event as the World Cup of professional interpretation, and it’s easy to see why. It can be grueling. One interpreter famously collapsed during a long speech by the late Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi. He had made it through 75 of the speech’s 95 minutes.

In addition to mulling a move of its corporate headquarters out of Connecticut, General Electric has announced it will close a gas engine plant in Waukesha, Wisconsin, and move the 350 jobs to Canada.

Last year, President Obama touted the plant as a proud example of American manufacturing. GE says its closing the Waukesha plant due to Congress’s failure to reauthorize the Export-Import Bank.

“Protected intersections,” designed to prevent car-bicycle collisions, have long existed in the Netherlands, but they are just catching on in the U.S.

After a former video game maker in Oregon created a video (below) explaining the design, one was recently built in Davis, California, and another in Salt Lake City, Utah, and plans are being discussed in cities across the country.

If you have a smartphone and a car, you could soon be working for Amazon. The e-commerce giant launched a new program in Seattle this week that pays part-time drivers, who have also passed a background check, to deliver packages.

The move is aimed at cutting down on delivery times, but it could also cause some legal headaches for Amazon. Samuel Burke of CNN joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with details.


Juan Salgado is president and CEO of the Instituto del Progreso Latino in Chicago, and today he was among the 24 winners of this year’s MacArthur Foundation “genius grants” who will each receive $625,000 over five years, no strings attached. Salgado’s organization has become a national model for helping immigrants learn English and improve their work skills.

For this week’s edition of the Here & Now DJ Sessions, host Jeremy Hobson sits down with KCRW DJ Anne Litt. Anne has been off the air waves for a while following a ski accident last winter. She shares some music that caught her ear during her recovery.

“These are really the artists that kept me going and have me most excited about being back on the air,” she said.

Shares in the commodities trader Glencore were doing better today after falling nearly 30 percent Monday as the company struggles with commodity prices that have hit record lows. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson looks at the markets and how commodity companies are grappling with low prices with Jason Bellini of The Wall Street Journal.

Planetary scientists have announced that there is evidence that liquid salt water flows on present-day Mars. The discovery was made by looking at images captured by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Jim Green, director of the Planetary Science Division at NASA, discusses the findings with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.


Panyia Vang, a 22-year-old woman originally from Laos, is seeking $450,000 from the Hmong man from Minnesota who she says traveled to her country and enticed her with promises of movie stardom when she was 14.

Instead, Vang says the man raped her, resulting in a pregnancy. Allegedly, he threatened to deny her visitation rights to their child if she didn’t continue to have sex with him.

On August 1, 1966, a man named Charles Whitman climbed to the top of the University of Texas clock tower and started shooting. When the carnage ended, 16 people were dead and 32 were left wounded. The dead included Whitman, who had already killed his wife and mother prior to opening fire on campus.

House Speaker John Boehner’s surprise resignation announcement has House Republicans scrambling today. Boehner announced that he will resign from leadership and from Congress at the end of October. The announcement came one day after Boehner, a devout Catholic greeted Pope Francis in a historic joint meeting of Congress.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd discusses Boehner’s resignation with ABC News’ Rick Klein.

House Speaker John Boehner will resign from leadership and from Congress at the end of October. His announcement came a day after he shed tears standing next to Pope Francis in Washington and nearly five years after he took the lead of a divided Republican caucus in the House.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with NPR’s Domenico Montanaro about what fueled Boehner’s resignation.

If you order oysters at a restaurant, how do you know they’re fresh? And can you only eat them during months that have an “r” in them, as the saying goes?

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd gets a primer on oysters from Matt Louis, chef and owner of The Franklin Oyster House in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

3 Pearls of Oyster Wisdom from Matt Louis

1. Geography affects taste.

When you think “casserole,” do you think noodles and canned soup?

Well, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst says that there are so many more options. Kathy has been experimenting with a White Bean and Sausage Casserole, adding Swiss chard and sausage to Macaroni and Cheese, and turning Eggplant Parmesan into Roasted Eggplant and Tomato Casserole.

She brings in a couple of her dishes for Peter and Robin and taps some of their memories of their favorite casseroles.

Sir David Willcocks died at his home in Cambridge, England on Sept. 17 at the age of 95. A conductor, organist, composer and arranger, Sir David was the music director of music at King’s College, Cambridge, for 17 years and spent 38 years as head of the Bach Choir.

He also worked with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir as well and the Rolling Stones. Sir David won a Grammy Award and was knighted by Queen Elizabeth for his contributions to the world of music.

The head of China, President Xi Jinping, will continue his U.S. visit this week with a trip to the White House.

On Thusday, Xi will be having a private dinner with President Obama. On Friday, there will be an official summit, a 21-gun salute and a formal state dinner, complete with brass bands.

NPR’s Marilyn Geewax joins Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd to discuss some of the economic and technology issues coming up between the two countries.

At 4:21 a.m. eastern time, autumn began in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the opposite is true at the South Pole, where spring is on the horizon.

For six months, the sun has been below the horizon at the South Pole, making it the coldest, darkest spot on the planet. The cold, dry weather is perfect for Samuel Harrison, a scientist there. He operates a microwave telescope — called the BICEP3 Telescope.

China’s President Xi Jinping started his seven-day tour of the U.S. with a speech to American technology firms and analysts, pledging to fight cybercrime and to disallow the Chinese government from overseas commercial theft and state hacking.

China has long been suspected by U.S. officials of stealing government information and intellectual property, and many openly worry about the possibility of more serious cyber violence. But, aiming to quell fears on both sides, the U.S. and China are negotiating what could be the first cyberspace arms accord in the world.

Chinese President Xi Jinping is in Seattle today to meet with tech and business leaders. It’s a crowd that already knows a lot about doing business in China: the risks, as well as the opportunities.

Carolyn Adolph, from Here & Now contributor KUOW in Seattle, reports.

The former NBC Nightly News anchor, Brian Williams, returns to the air on Tuesday for the first time since he was suspended six months ago for fabricating aspects of his reporting.

Now an MSNBC breaking news reporter, Williams will be leading the network’s coverage of Pope Francis’s visit to the U.S.

NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss why Williams, unlike previous disgraced journalists, is being given a second chance.

Researchers at the University of Chicago have found that when you’re lonely, your brain may actually operate differently.

The researchers found that when lonely people are exposed to negative social cues of some kind, the electrical activity in their brains is more extreme. Meaning lonely people are subconsciously guarding against social threats, which could lead them to be even more isolated — and more lonely.

It’s a dilemma many American families confront: when to ask mom or pop if they’re ready to move into an old folks’ home.

For newer Americans, the very idea often clashes with cultural expectations. A for-profit senior housing chain and a Seattle nonprofit are separately investing millions of dollars to expand senior living options specifically geared for Chinese elders. The demand for this housing reflects changing attitudes among Asian immigrant families about how to give and receive care in old age.