Here and Now

Weekdays at Noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

For more information or to listen to more segments, visit the official website for Here and Now.

Public Radio's daily news magazine bringing up-to-date midday news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Narendra Modi’s three-day visit to the United States features a speech to a joint session of Congress. Modi heads the world’s largest democracy, and is the fifth Indian leader to make such a speech since 1985.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Michael Kugleman on what this visit means for relations between the two countries.

1968 was a landmark year in American history. There were riots, assassinations and protests against the war in Vietnam. And it all affected the presidential election that year.

A new book from author Michael A. Cohen digs into the big political players in that drama, and argues that what happened in that 1968 campaign is still being reflected in the politics of today – and this year’s presidential election. Cohen joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to talk about “American Maelstrom: The 1968 Election and the Politics of Division.”

The New York law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore announced in a memo this week that it is increasing the annual salary it pays to first-year lawyers, from $160,000 to $180,000, for the first time in nea

A growing number of Republicans are publicly criticizing likely GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump for insisting that federal judge Gonzalo Curiel cannot objectively rule on two lawsuits against Trump University because the judge has Mexican heritage.

Legal expert David Post tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young that the First Amendment protects Trump’s right to say anything he wants about the judge or the court system, but voters must consider what it means for a presidential candidate to attack judicial independence and the rule of law.

Los Angeles is famous for many things, including its traffic and its traffic helicopters. Rick Dickert is one of the traffic and weather reporters who rides high above the city every morning, watching the city’s streets for the morning commute.

During his latest trip to Los Angeles, Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson rode along with Dickert and talked about Los Angeles traffic and how the city is changing.

Nike has long been aggressive in trying to get athletes to sign on to sponsorship deals, but the apparel company is going a step further and turning to the courts.

Nike has sued Boris Berian, the world indoor 800-meter champion, alleging he violated a short-term endorsement contract that expired last December. At issue is his January agreement to accept a New Balance sponsorship.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Jason Bellini of the Wall Street Journal about the case and the ramifications for athletes.

On Dec. 2, 2015, the city of San Bernardino, California, a city employee and his wife entered the Inland Regional Center armed with semi-automatic weapons and opened fire. Fourteen people were killed; 22 were injured. The terrorist attack left the community in tatters, changing the city and the national dialogue about security and home grown terrorists.

Latinos make up 38 percent of California’s population, a larger percentage than even whites. On a national level, polls show Latinos are skeptical and even hostile towards the candidacy of Donald Trump, in part because of the rhetoric he uses to describe Mexico, Mexicans and Latino immigrants.

Iran is increasing its oil exports more quickly than many thought possible, according to a report from Reuters. Iran is partnering with Asian and European supertankers to get its product out, after sanctions were lifted in January.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Jill Schlesinger of CBS News about what is responsible for a higher level of output than expected.

Summer TV is back, and the big networks, cable networks and streaming services have lots of fresh fare. There’s a new show from the creators of “The Walking Dead.” Simon Cowell returns to “America’s Got Talent.”

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans.

Sumner Redstone, the 93-year-old media mogul, is at the center of an intense corporate legal drama.

Two weeks ago, Redstone fired Viacom CEO Philippe Dauman and board member George Abrams, both longtime confidantes. He also dismissed two former girlfriends and caregivers, one of whom is also launching legal action. His granddaughter Keryn Redstone alleges that these machinations are the work of Shari Redstone, Sumner’s daughter, who she says has swayed him at a time when he’s incapacitated.

The Labor Department reported today that the U.S. economy added only 38,000 jobs in May, far lower than most economists predicted.

While unemployment dropped to 4.7 percent, its lowest rate since November 2007, that’s largely due to more people giving up the search for work. Wall Street opened lower at news of the smallest monthly addition of jobs in almost six years.

Mike Regan, Bloomberg Gadfly columnist, joins Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti for a closer look at the lackluster jobs numbers and what they mean for the U.S. economy.

More rain is in the forecast for much of Texas, parts of which are experiencing devastating flooding. This comes after a year of seemingly relentless rain and flooding.

A year ago Memorial Day, floods devastated Central Texas. Since then, many cities and towns have been able to rebuild.

But in the small Latino community Martindale, outside of Austin, residents are still struggling. For Here & Now contributor KUT, Vanessa Rancaño reports.

Cindy Howes hosts the Morning Mix on WYEP in Pittsburgh, and she says the music coming out of the city goes beyond the sports bar rock bands that many expect.

Howes joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson for this week’s edition of the Here & Now DJ Sessions.

The United Arab Emirates, one of the driest countries in the world, wants it to rain more, so the country is looking into building an artificial mountain.

When moist air rises up a mountain, it cools and forms clouds that could produce rain. The UAE has been manipulating the weather in the past few years, seeding clouds to produce more rain.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Bruce Boe, vice president of meteorology at Weather Modification Inc.

When Neil Fachon was 20, he was diagnosed with a rare and incurable brain tumor, a cancer so aggressive it usually kills people within a year. In search of any and all treatment options, Fachon found an experimental therapy being offered in Texas.

But just one day into the treatment, the FDA ordered the doctor offering it to stop. So Fachon and his family decided to sue the FDA for the right to keep trying the experimental drugs.

The emphasis on standardized testing in schools across the country has many educators worried that some students aren’t learning the basics of reading and writing. That’s leading some districts to try creative methods to increase literacy, particularly for young students in low-income and minority neighborhoods.

Last year, countries around the world installed more renewable energy capacity than ever before. Investments in solar, wind and hydropower were more than twice as high as the amount spent on developing new fossil fuel sources.

China accounted for more than one third of the $286 billion spent on renewable energy development in 2015, according to a new report by REN21, a renewable energy think tank based at the United Nations Environment Program in Paris.

After weeks of scrutiny, the Transportation Security Administration took steps to limit delays at the nation’s airports over Memorial Day weekend. And while many holiday travelers were pleasantly surprised by the manageable wait times, staffing and budget problems at the TSA all but guarantee long lines will return.

Last night, the Golden State Warriors beat the Oklahoma City Thunder, securing a spot in the NBA finals that begin on Thursday. As usual, TV crews and photographers had their lenses trained on every basket in the 96-88 game, but broadcasters also drew on a relatively new piece of technology to help document the action.

Through a partnership with Intel, the NBA has been using 3D video to create 360-degree replays of slam dunks and other show-stopping plays. It’s the NBA version of the red carpet Glam Cam.

When a big dairy or meatpacking company comes into a Midwest city to build a factory, it doesn’t just bring in new jobs and industry. Farmers change what they grow, expand their herds, and buy new land. That can literally change the surrounding landscape.

Luke Runyon of Here & Now contributor Harvest Public Media reports on the expansion of a Leprino’s factory in Northern Colorado.

If you’ve been out on the roads this holiday weekend, you might notice that it’s getting harder and harder to find a tollbooth with a human being actually taking tolls. Toll plazas all over the country are going automatic. But just at the top of the Florida Keys, there’s a tollbooth with people inside.

Jenny Luna was with the Miami Herald when she reported this story for Here & Now contributor WLRN in Miami.

In the 1930s, a Japanese-American teacher in Hawaii came up with an ambitious plan: take kids who had just learned to swim in a re-purposed sugar cane ditch and train them to compete on an international level.

Julie Checkoway tells the story in “The Three Year Swim Club: The Untold Story of Maui’s Sugar Ditch Kids and Their Quest for Olympic Glory.” Here & Now revisits Meghna Chakrabarti’s conversation with the author from last October.

President Barack Obama marked this Memorial Day by placing a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery. People are visiting the graves of their loved ones killed in action at cemeteries across the country today.

Here & Now’s Alex Ashlock went to the Massachusetts National Cemetery on Cape Cod last week, and has this report.

Charisma is a crucial component of a politician’s appeal to voters. But there’s more than one way to inspire confidence, or even adoration, among the audience of a political speech.

Voice scientist Rosario Signorello has studied how the current presidential candidates change their pitch and volume during public appearances. This week he presented that research at the Spring 2016 meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Netflix announced earlier this year that it’s planning to pour $6 billion into original programming in 2016.

As a new Adam Sandler and David Spade original film premieres tonight, NPR’s Eric Deggans tells Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti that the company’s definition of success is different for each project.

Facebook and Microsoft announced Thursday that they will work together on a project to build a new 4,000 mile-long cable under the Atlantic. It’s one of many high-capacity cables being built by tech companies, and shows an increasing involvement from Silicon Valley in the internet’s infrastructure.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti hears more about the project from Michael Regan of Bloomberg Gadfly.

A traditional Native American healing ceremony is performed to promote a sense of wellness and to connect participants in mind, body and spirit.

The ceremonies can include prayer, chants and sacred objects and are often accompanied by music played on traditional instruments. But one healing ceremony in Phoenix has been reimagined for the digital age.

Jimmy Jenkins from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports.

This week, Here & Now has been speaking with 2016 college graduates about the biggest challenges they faced in school, and where they plan to go next.

Today, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Peace Odiase, one of two valedictorians at Fisk University, a historically black college in Nashville, Tennessee.

If your child is taking medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), their doctor may soon offer a new option: fruit-flavored chewables.

The new drug, Adzenys XR-ODT, got FDA approval in January, and went on the market last week. But some psychiatrists are concerned that making amphetamines in a candy-like form will make people more likely to abuse them, and also contribute to what some see as a trend of overmedicating children.

Here & Now’s Robin Young talks with Meghana Keshavan, biotech correspondent at STAT.

Pages