Here and Now

Weekdays at Noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

For more information or to listen to more segments, visit the official website for Here and Now.

Public Radio's daily news magazine bringing up-to-date midday news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is calling the city council’s approval of his plan to revamp police oversight a big step forward.

The plan creates a new agency to investigate police shootings and misconduct, and includes a civilian board. This comes in the wake of outrage after the release of a video showing an officer fatally shooting African-American teenager Laquan McDonald.

Chip Mitchell of WBEZ reports.

The United Nations Security Council today approved Portugal’s former prime minister Antonio Guterres as the next U.N. secretary-general, replacing Ban Ki Moon.

Guterres served 10 years as the U.N. high commissioner for refugees, a role he believes has prepared him to serves as secretary general.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Michael Doyle, a former U.N. assistant secretary-general, about Guterres and the role he will play on the world stage.

Here is the image mentioned in the segment:


A segment that aired on “The O’Reilly Factor” this week is drawing criticism for the way it stereotyped Asian Americans.

Fox News Correspondent Jesse Watters went to Chinatown in New York City to ask people on the street their opinion of Donald Trump and China-U.S. relations. He starts out by asking two women if he is supposed to bow to say hello, and goes on to incorporate a number of other stereotypes about Asian Americans.

A new study says that the size of a yawn can be used to predict to the size of one’s brain.

Researchers at the State University of New York at Oneonta studied 19 species, including humans, and found yawning to be a stimulant for brain growth.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson is joined by Sharon Begley, senior science writer for STAT news, for more on the study.

Looking for a new piece of art to display in your home? You could visit a local gallery. Or you could do what lots of galleries are doing these days: check out Instagram.

Hady Mawajdeh of KERA in Dallas takes a look at how the photo sharing app is seriously expanding the art world.

Supporters of Donald Trump have been defending the Republican presidential nominee, saying that Trump’s business genius was revealed by a New York Times story this weekend that found that Trump may have avoided paying federal income taxes for 18 years.

Journalist and author David Cay Johnston joins Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss his reporting today, which took a closer look at Trump’s taxes.

Uber is expanding its food delivery service, UberEats, planning to expand to at least 22 more countries in the next few months.

The delivery service launched in London and a few U.S. cities in the spring and summer, and this week began operating in Amsterdam, Dubai, Johannesburg and Tokyo. UberEats plans to be up and running in Stockholm, Jakarta, Bangkok and other cities within months.

Ash Vs. Evil Dead,” the television spin-off of the cult classic 1980s films, makes its return to Starz for season two on Sunday.

Bruce Campbell plays Ash Williams, a comical-yet-flawed character who returns to his hometown to fight evil. The series includes violent scenes that have no shortage of blood and gore for viewers, but how far is too far?

NPR’s Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the series’s return.

The United States owes African Americans reparations for its history of “racial terrorism,” according to a new report from a United Nations working group based in Geneva.

The team was invited by the U.S. government to conduct a fact-finding mission that explored the many ways in which racial discrimination has taken form, including police violence, mass incarceration and housing segregation; it also looks back in detail at slavery and the brutal practice of lynching.

This summer one of the largest birds in North America suddenly showed up in Washington state’s Puget Sound.

Squadrons of white pelicans have set area birders atwitter. They’re trying to figure out where the birds came from and what their arrival means.

While this rare sighting has been fun for bird watchers, Katie Campbell from Here & Now contributor Earthfix reports on why it may not be a good thing for the pelicans.

The newest Doritos have little flavor, no flashy color, minimal crunch and dull gray packaging. The kind of snack, essentially, that no one would choose.

And that, according to executives at Frito-Lay, is exactly the point.

The new chips are part of a campaign with Rock the Vote to boost voter registration among college students. Special vending machines placed on college campuses will be asking snackers whether they’ve registered to vote.

John and Heidi Small were told that it was a bad idea to start an all-’80s radio station.

But six years ago, the husband-wife team went ahead with their plan.

They run Sunny Radio in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and they speak with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about some of their favorite songs.

For more than a century, the designers of tall buildings have used mostly concrete and steel. But advances in structural engineering have sparked new interest among architects in one of the world’s oldest building materials: wood.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Michael Green, a Vancouver-based architect who says wood is just as strong as concrete or steel — and more sustainable.

Robert Finley is not your average new artist.

At 63, the north Louisiana blues and soul musician has already lived a lifetime. He served as a helicopter serviceman in the Army in the ’70s and worked as a carpenter for decades until he started to lose his sight a few years ago.

Unable to continue working, Finley fell back on his dream: singing and playing guitar.

America is experiencing an unprecedented opioid epidemic.

On average, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says 78 people die from an opioid-related overdose every day. Prevention and treatment are key to fighting the crisis and new, innovative ideas in both areas are gaining traction in Boston after an opioid “hack-athon.”

Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with two of the hack-athon winners, Scott Strode and Aubri Esters, about the impact they hope to have with their projects.

Some say a new housing crisis is developing. Rising prices mean home ownership is now nearly impossible for young families saddled with student debt.

It’s a problem in places like Seattle and Denver, where there are a lot of college graduates as well as the fastest growing home prices.

Ben Markus from Here & Now contributor Colorado Public Radio explains.

As presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump get ready for their first debate Monday night, Here & Now looks at some of the highlights in the history of presidential debates.

The first Clinton-Trump debate falls on the anniversary of the first-ever televised presidential debate, between Republican Richard Nixon and Democrat John F. Kennedy, on Sept. 26, 1960.

There’s just over a week left in Major League Baseball’s regular season. But only one team — the Chicago Cubs — has clinched a playoff berth.

That means the race for the postseason, both division winners and wild card hopefuls, is reaching a crescendo.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca about how the end of the season is shaping up.

Bassam Al Abbas does not like to think about the civil war raging in his home country of Syria.

The conflict, which produced nearly 5 million refugees and internally displaced millions more, also drove him and his family from their homes in 2012. For years they navigated foreign languages and vetting systems before eventually settling in Austin, Texas, in May.

“I cannot describe how much they welcomed me,” Al Abbas told Here & Now. “They made us love this country.”

A sculpture with a secret message at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia, has stumped amateur code breakers for a quarter-century.

Elonka Dunin, a software developer from Nashville, Tennessee, has spent the better part of two decades trying to unravel the mystery of Kryptos.

Tony Youngblood from Here & Now contributor Nashville Public Radio has her story.

The Washington Post reported Tuesday that Donald Trump spent more than $250,000 from his charitable foundation to settle lawsuits involving his businesses.

When the new National Museum of African American History and Culture opens this weekend in Washington, D.C., one of the exhibits will be a collection of photographs from the late 1930s to the 1940s, taken by a young African-American woman named Laura Fitzpatrick.

As NPR’s Elizabeth Blair reports, Fitzpatrick chose to capture images of life at its best.

A law enforcement official says the Afghan immigrant wanted in connection with explosions in New York City and New Jersey has been taken into custody following a shootout with police officers.

The official says two officers were shot in the encounter in Linden, New Jersey.

Authorities were looking for Ahmad Khan Rahami, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Afghanistan with an address in Elizabeth, New Jersey.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti gets the latest from NPR’s Hansi Lo Wang.


Historically, the working poor in America had very little leisure time while the upper class had plenty. Now, the opposite is true, at least for working class men.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Derek Thompson of The Atlantic about the surprising statistics, what working class men do with their leisure time and what might be the reasons behind their behavior.

In the past few days, authorities in New York, Minnesota and New Jersey have been seeking answers in a series of incidents that are raising questions about homegrown extremism.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti takes a closer look at each event with security expert Seth Jones of RAND Corporation.

Health experts have warned about the growing risks people face as bacteria increasingly become resistant to antibiotics.

A team led by Professor Roy Kishony of Harvard Medical School and Technion Israel Institute of Technology found a way to show just how quickly bacteria can evolve to be resistant, and their video has gone viral.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with postdoctoral fellow Michael Baym about how he made the video, and what the team hopes to accomplish with its research.

The Chinese and Russian navies are conducting military exercises in the South China Sea, which has been the subject of territorial disputes between China and its Southeast Asian neighbors.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Stephen Nagy of the International Christian University of Tokyo about whether they are risking a provocation.

Interview Highlights: Stephen Nagy

On what the exercises are about

Award-winning shows like “Game of Thrones” and “Veep” will be well represented at Sunday’s Emmy Awards, but some new names may collect statuettes.

“The Americans’” Keri Russell is looking for her first Emmy, as is veteran actor Courtney B. Vance, who gave a strong performance as Johnny Cochran in “American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson.” ABC’s “Black-ish” may also finally get recognized as a top comedy this year, though in an election year, Emmy voters may continue to award another solid season of “Veep.”

The top four Paralympic runners competing in the 1,500-meter final on Sunday beat the final time posted by Olympic gold medalist Matt Centrowitz Jr. at the Rio Games less than a month ago. The visually impaired runners did not use assisted technologies or guides.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Erin Strout of Runner’s World magazine about the record-breaking runners, and other standout Paralympic performances.

Managers have many reasons to say “no” to employees, but it can be difficult to work for someone who always says “no” to new ideas.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with author and employee engagement expert David Sturt about why saying “yes” more often might be better for business.