Here and Now

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  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

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Public Radio's daily news magazine bringing up-to-date midday news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

President Trump met Monday with leaders from the top U.S. technology companies, including Apple, Amazon, Google and Microsoft. The meeting was the first of the newly created American Technology Council, which is charged with transforming the federal government’s technology.

When two ambulances, sirens blaring, get to an intersection at the same time, which one gets to go first? It’s a scenario that can result in accidents and add precious seconds to response time.

The Supreme Court has agreed to hear a partisan gerrymandering case out of Wisconsin. It’s the first case of its kind to make it to the high court.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Emily Bazelon (@emilybazelon), staff writer at the New York Times Magazine and a fellow at Yale Law School, about the case’s significance.

On Friday, six members of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS resigned. In an op-ed published in Newsweek, council member Scott Schoettes wrote he and other members could no longer be effective serving a “president who simply does not care.”

Penn State is considering reforms to the school’s fraternities, after video tapes and an investigation showed that Beta Theta Pi pledge Timothy Piazza died after being forced to drink excessively.

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Every year we commemorate the graduation season with folk singer Tom Rush’s performance of Murray McLauchlan’s “Child’s Song.” As Rush tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young, it’s a song that continues to resonate as children grow up and leave home.

A woman who sent her boyfriend a barrage of text messages urging him to kill himself when they were both teenagers was convicted Friday of involuntary manslaughter.

Juvenile Court Judge Lawrence Moniz found that Michelle Carter caused the death of Conrad Roy III. Carter cried as the judge explained his reasoning but remained stoic when the verdict was read.

The Pentagon is expected to send nearly 4,000 additional troops to Afghanistan to help train Afghan forces, according to a U.S. official, who said there’s no word yet on when Secretary of Defense James Mattis will make that announcement.

It’s been four years since brothers Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev bombed the Boston Marathon. Since then there have been a number of other terror attacks — in Paris, Manchester, Brussels and Paris again — where the attackers either used bombs similar to the ones used in Boston, or where the attackers were brothers.

The Navajo band I Dont Konform sings about oppression and the struggles of life on the reservation. The group recently got the attention of Grammy-winning Metallica producer Flemming Rasmussen, who produced its first album.

A shooting Wednesday at a sprawling UPS warehouse and customer service center in San Francisco sent multiple victims to a hospital, officials said.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young checks in with John Sepulvado (@johnlgc), host of KQED’s California Report.

With reporting from The Associated Press

Hawaii is defying President Trump yet again. This time, by passing legislation that commits the state to follow goals outlined in the Paris climate accord. This comes after Trump withdrew the U.S. from the agreement.

The Mall of America has 520 stores, 18,000 parking spaces, shark tanks and amusement park rides. Starting this week, it also has a poet.

Twenty-seven-year-old Brian Sonia-Wallace beat out 4,000 others for a shot at the Mall of America writer in residence position, celebrating the Bloomington, Minnesota, mall’s 25th birthday.

The gun violence prevention nonprofit Sandy Hook Promise has dropped NBC’s Megyn Kelly as host of its annual gala, over Kelly’s plans to air an interview with conspiracy theorist and Infowars host Alex Jones on her show on Sunday.

The Republic on the Move party is a little more than a year old, but its leader Emmanuel Macron is now the French president, and the party did well in Sunday’s first round of parliamentary elections. It could have a huge majority in the French Parliament after this Sunday’s runoff.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson checks in with Florence Villeminot (@flovilleminot) of France 24.

Uber’s board is reportedly weighing a leave of absence for CEO and co-founder Travis Kalanick as part of a broader shake-up to try to improve company culture. The board voted unanimously over the weekend to adopt a range of recommendations from former Attorney General Eric Holder.

Comedy is booming in the United States, and Rolling Stone is showcasing some of the funniest in the business today with a new list: “The 50 Funniest People Right Now.”

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Rob Sheffield (@robsheff), author of the article, about what makes these comedians so great.

When a natural disaster like a hurricane or tornado hits, there’s often a lot of cleanup that comes afterward. In cemeteries and historic places, the damage can extend underground if uprooted trees tear up buried artifacts or even human remains.

Emily Jones (@ejreports) of Here & Now contributor Georgia Public Broadcasting went along with a crew in Savannah that’s looking for unearthed history from last fall’s Hurricane Matthew.

In recent days, there have been revelations about ethics waivers that allow federal employees to avoid ethics rules. And there have also been ethics questions raised about President Trump’s son Eric Trump.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets an update on the Trump administration and ethics from NPR’s Marilyn Geewax (@geewaxnpr).

There’s a lot of talk on Wall Street about the possibility of major moves in the market Thursday because of three events: former FBI director James Comey’s testimony in Congress, elections in the U.K. and a big meeting of the European Central Bank.

The British election is Thursday, and while Prime Minister Theresa May is still ahead in the polls, support for Labour Party candidate Jeremy Corbyn has grown more than expected.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson checks in with Mike Katz (@mikekatz), the Labour Party parliamentary candidate for the London suburb of Hendon.

Sarah Mack pilots her 24-foot boat to the edge of a grassy salt marsh in southern Louisiana to bring a slow-moving, $90 billion crisis to life.

Tierra Resources, a wetland restoration company, planted plastic poles at the edge of the marsh more than a year ago. Today, those poles stand alone in the water — at least 6 feet from the shore.

“And this is a more protected site,” says Mack, who started Tierra Resources after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans. “This is not bad erosion.”

Since the middle of the last century more than 90 percent of Isle de Jean Charles has dissolved into the southern Louisiana bayou.

The island, which is connected to the outside world by a road that’s known to flood in perfect weather, is home to a tribe of Native Americans who have fished and hunted there since the 1800s.

Those who remain are barely clinging to what’s left.

The film “Wonder Woman” took in over $100 million at the box office in its first weekend, the biggest opening ever for a female director.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with historian Jill Lepore, author of “The Secret History of Wonder Woman,” about the evolution of the comic book character and Wonder Woman’s connection to feminism.

The start of the summer TV season means the return of audience favorites, plus dozens of series premieres. Networks are experimenting with reality competitions and comedies along with a new generation of game shows.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans (@Deggans) joins Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd with more on what to expect from this summer’s lineup.

“I, Daniel Blake” won the top prize at last year’s Cannes Film Festival. On Friday, the gut-wrenching film about the struggles of living under England’s welfare system opens in U.S. theaters.

Howie Movshovitz (@HowieMovshovitz) of member station KUNC reports that it’s the latest from one of Britain’s greatest living filmmakers, Ken Loach.

The new Netflix movie “War Machine” features Brad Pitt as an American general commanding allied forces in Afghanistan. The film is a fictionalized account of the downfall of a real U.S. general, Stanley McChrystal, who was relieved of duty by President Obama after a less-than-flattering profile in Rolling Stone.

Locals put the crisis into a perspective that’s easy to understand.

Louisiana loses a football field of land every hour of the day.

“Even my customers are starting to recognize it now,” says charter boat captain Ripp Blank. “And it don’t come back once it leaves.”

Blank has been fishing the waters around Bayou Barataria — 30 miles or so north of the Gulf of Mexico — his entire life. If you’re a newcomer, it can be hard to discern where the water ends and the land begins.

There are reports that President Trump has decided to withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change. Wednesday morning, he tweeted that he will make a formal announcement this week.

His Tinder profile said he was “one of a kind,” “the most eligible bachelor in the world,” “6 feet tall” and, finally, 5,000 pounds. Sudan is the last male White Northern rhinoceros in the world, and his keepers at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya put out the Tinder ad as an opportunity to spread awareness and raise money toward the very expensive in vitro fertilization that is the last hope for keeping the species alive.

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