Morning Edition

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Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

More information is available at the Morning Edition website found here.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. There was a big scare this week that bubble wrap as we know it is dead. The Internet flipped out when Sealed Air Corp announced a new type of bubble wrap. It'll be cheaper to store and ship but much less satisfying.

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Elisavet Zachariadou is a retired professor of history in Athens. She admires Italian art and reads French literature and German philosophy. She considers herself a European.

"When I learned that Greece is going to be part of the European Union [in the 1980s], I was very happy," she recalls. "And I said, 'How nice. And how good for all of us.' "

But Zachariadou's attachment to Europe is complex. She's 84 and lives in the Athens suburb where she grew up during World War II, when Nazi Germany invaded Greece and her people suffered horribly.

Brian Hoffman via flickr Creative Commons

If today's installment of Something Wild fell to my NH Audubon cohorts, it would be easy to feature our national symbol, the Bald Eagle--perfect for patriotic Fourth of July! Instead, "NH Forest Guy" wracks his brain to make a tree connection to our nation's birthday. All I could come up with is that bottle rockets are affixed to wooden sticks and that firecrackers and other pyrotechnics are constructed and packaged using cardboard and paper--all derived from tree. No trees? No fireworks!

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Having clinched the long-sought prize of same-sex marriage in all 50 states, some long-time advocates are now waking up to the realization that they need to find a new job. At least one major same-sex marriage advocacy group is preparing to close down and other LGBT organizations are retooling.

They have grown from a ragtag group with a radical idea into a massive multi-million dollar industry of slick and sophisticated sellers of a dream. Today, their very success has made their old jobs obsolete.

Photo by Rich Beauchesne/Seacoastonline

Portsmouth Police Sgt. Aaron Goodwin was fired last week, after an independent report cited him for several ethics violations for accepting a disputed $2.7 million inheritance.

But the story doesn’t end there, as the controversy has raised questions about the future of the city's police commission.

A judge also has yet to rule on whether he can keep the money.

Elizabeth Dinan is a reporter for the Portsmouth Herald.

She’s been following the story and joined NHPR's Morning Edition to give us the latest.

The 66th floor of Panama City's Trump Tower is a fine spot to experience Panama's booming economy. Beyond the building's windows, hundreds of skyscrapers stretch the length of the capital's skyline. Inside, a hand of blackjack will set you back $200, but all-you-can-drink champagne costs just $10.

On average, economic growth in Panama has topped 8 percent in the last five years, making the country the envy of its struggling Latin American neighbors.

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

In the past few days, we've heard pastors on the air who disagree with the Supreme Court's decision and insist they will not perform weddings for same-sex couples. This has caused many of you to write in with a question.

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