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Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

More information is available at the Morning Edition website found here.

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Let's ask now what a shift in U.S. tactics really means for Syria. The U.S. is adjusting its approach to the self-declared Islamic State.

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(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ROADHOUSE BLUES")

THE DOORS: (Singing) Let it roll, baby.

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Brady Carlson / NHPR

The first rule of campaigning: Go where the voters are. On a sunny Saturday afternoon in Manchester’s Arms Park, the Granite State Brewers Association Summerfest has already drawn more than 1,200 people – and that's drawn one of the sixteen announced Republican presidential candidates, former New York Governor George Pataki.

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As brash businessman Donald Trump continues his surprising surge in the national presidential polls, behind the scenes, there’s a well-known GOP operative from New Hampshire pulling the strings.

Corey Lewandowski was the director of the conservative Americans for Prosperity here in the Granite State.

He’s now campaign manager for Donald Trump.

Android is the most popular mobile operating system on Earth: About 80 percent of smartphones run on it. And, according to mobile security experts at the firm Zimperium, there's a gaping hole in the software — one that would let hackers break into someone's phone and take over, just by knowing the phone's number.

Just A Text

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The billboard that President Obama will see when he exits the airport in Nairobi on Friday says: "Welcome Home, Mr. President."

Obama's Kenyan roots have been a source of pride, but at times a source of discord, too, in the land of his father's birth.

For example, when Barack Obama won the U.S. presidency in 2008, Kenyans were ecstatic. His victory was declared a national holiday.

Remember that Chris Farley character from "Saturday Night Live?" The motivational speaker who lived in van down by the river.

Well, visitors to New York can now spend the night in a van down by the East River.

A listing on AirBnB is offering bed space in several vans in Long Island City.... ranging in price from $22 to $99.

The vans lack almost all amenities. One guest commented that "not being able to shower was definitely a negative ... seeing as New York isn't very clean."

A motorcyclist in Dallas crashed into a car and the rider ended up trapped under the car.

Emergency personnel tried to use a jack to lift the vehicle, but it failed. And it was taking too long to bring heavier equipment.

So a crowd of emergency responders and passers-by lifted the vehicle by hand.

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Tomorrow marks 50 years since the night Bob Dylan plugged in his guitar. In 1965, the singer took an electric instrument onstage at the Newport Folk Festival.

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Lady Luck has a sense of humor. The odds of being struck by lightning or winning the lottery are very slim.

The likelihood that both will happen to the same person are about one in 2.6 trillion. Peter McCathie is that one.

The Canadian man survived a lightning strike when he was a kid.

And now, after buying lottery tickets for about a year, McCathie has struck it big. He won a million dollars.

He's not gambling with the winnings. He's taking his wife on a second honeymoon.

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