TED Radio Hour on Listen Live

Saturdays at 1 pm, Tuesdays at 7 pm

TED Radio Hour website

A journey through fascinating ideas, astonishing inventions, and new ways to think and create. Based on riveting TEDTalks from the world's most remarkable minds.

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Podcasts

  • Friday, July 11, 2014 12:53am

    Science and technology now allow us to "hack" solutions to the biggest challenges of our time. But how far is too far? And what are the consequences of these hacks? In this hour, we hear stories from TED speakers who dare to hack the brain, the climate, and even the animal kingdom in hopes of creating a better world. Computer security expert Mikko Hyppönen describes how he discovered the first PC virus and what he learned about protecting the Internet today. Environmentalist Stewart Brand says we now have the technology to bring back some of the species that humanity has wiped out. Climate scientist David Keith proposes a cheap and surprising way to address climate change. Inventor Jay Silver encourages everyone to play with the world around us. Neurosurgeon Andres Lozano talks about dramatic findings in deep brain stimulation.

  • Thursday, July 3, 2014 1:33am

    Gazing up at the night sky is simultaneously humbling and utterly thrilling. This hour, we’ll hear from TED speakers who share an infectious sense of wonder and curiosity about our place in the universe and what lies beyond our skies. Phil Plait breaks down how we can defend Earth from an asteroid. Jill Tarter of the SETI Institute explains why it’s crucial for humans here on earth to continue searching for sentient beings in the cosmos. Physicist Brian Greene unravels the strange tale of dark matter and why our universe may be one of many in the “multiverse.”

  • Friday, June 27, 2014 12:43am

    Even the most original ideas are essentially remixes.  When is copying flattery, when is it thievery, and when is it sheer genius? In this hour, TED speakers explore how sampling, borrowing, and riffing make all of us innovators. Sampling music isn't about "hijacking nostalgia wholesale," says DJ Mark Ronson. It's about inserting yourself into the narrative of a song while pushing that story forward. Filmmaker Kirby Ferguson says nothing is original and that our most celebrated creators steal ideas — and transform them into something new. Clothing designs aren’t protected by copyright — and the industry benefits by being more innovative, says Johanna Blakley. People often credit their ideas to individual "Eureka!" moments. But writer Steven Johnson shows how history tells a different story.

  • Friday, June 20, 2014 1:23am

    Let’s face it: people lie.  We lie to each other and to ourselves. Is there a deeper reason why we do it?  In this episode, TED speakers deconstruct the hard truths of deception. Behavioral economist Dan Ariely explains the hidden reasons we think it's okay to cheat or steal. Pamela Meyer points out manners and cues that can help us suss out a lie. Technology might actually force us to be more honest, says psychologist Jeff Hancock. Michael Shermer says the human tendency to believe strange things boils down to two of the brain's most basic, hard-wired survival skills. Magician Eric Mead extends the placebo effect to magic, pulling off a gruesome trick that’s so convincing, you’ll cringe.

  • Friday, June 13, 2014 2:23am

     

    We all have our struggles, whether they be mental, physical, or social. But what is it that makes some of us keep trying and striving to overcome despite the odds? In this hour, TED speakers tell their stories about overcoming a weakness and turning it into a strength. Temple Grandin talks about how she struggled with autism for years until she realized that her ability to “think in pictures” allows her to solve problems that many others might miss. Shane Koyczan describes being tormented endlessly by bullies, but when he turned to spoken word poetry as an adult, he found a community of fans eager to embrace him for his anti-bullying message. Eleanor Longden recounts how her life was spiraling out of control when she was diagnosed with schizophrenia, hospitalized, and drugged — until she learned to listen to and live with her voices. Kakenya Ntaiya tells the fearless story of challenging ingrained traditions, insisting to continue her education, and becoming the first girl to leave her Maasai village for college.