2016 Candidate Profiles

As his son Chris is running for governor, John H. Sununu, isn’t just playing the role of supportive father. He’s also one of his son’s most powerful campaign cheerleaders.

At a recent rally for vice presidential candidate Mike Pence in Exeter, Sununu encouraged the crowd to make sure they vote a Republican ticket — including the one running for governor who has, in his words, “a name I like to talk about.”

Allegra Boverman/NHPR

In his campaign to become New Hampshire’s next governor, Democrat Colin Van Ostern often talks about his business experience and his votes on the Executive Council. But there’s another, less talked about portion of his resume that could be just as important to his run for governor.

NHPR

The New Hampshire Bureau of Securities Regulation is not your typical layover on the road to the Democratic nomination for governor. But if anyone can make the case for a former financial watchdog in the corner office, it might be Mark Connolly. 

He’s already written a book about it.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

As part of our primary coverage, we’re looking at some of the experiences that have shaped the candidates who are running for governor. NHPR’s Casey McDermott joins us to talk about Republican Frank Edelblut and the record he established during his first term in the House of Representatives.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

This year’s race for New Hampshire governor has a crowded and diverse field. There are legislators, mayors, executive councilors, and all with private sector experience.

As part of our primary coverage, we’re looking at how those experiences shape the candidates' bid for the corner office. All Things Considered host Peter Biello talked with NHPR reporter Paige Sutherland about Republican Jeanie Forrester and her time as chairwoman of the Senate Finance Committee. 

NHPR

Democratic candidate for governor Steve Marchand says he is the most liberal person in this year’s race.  But he’s asking people to put aside some assumptions about what the term “liberal” means.  Speaking with All Things Considered host Peter Biello, NHPR's Emily Corwin explains.

Biello:  First of all, tell me a bit about Steve Marchand. He may be more familiar to Seacoast listeners than to folks elsewhere in the state.

For Democratic gubernatorial candidate Colin Van Ostern, two New Hampshire employers – Stonyfield Farm and Southern New Hampshire University -- figure heavily in his message to voters. NHPR’s Jason Moon reports on what Van Ostern’s time at these companies might tell us about how he’d operate as governor.

Republican Chris Sununu has made his experience as head of the Waterville Valley ski resort a big part of his campaign for governor. What does his time there tell us about his readiness to take the corner office in the State House?

NHPR staff

Ted Gatsas isn’t the first candidate for governor to take advantage of a gap in New Hampshire’s election law that allows wealthy donors to dodge limits on campaign contributions.

But no one has benefited more from the so-called LLC loophole than the Manchester mayor.

 

When Governor Maggie Hassan talks about why she got into politics her explanation tends to center on her son, Ben.

“Right after he was born Tom and I learned that Ben had severe and pervasive physical disabilities.”

Less emphasized is the role of her father, Robert Wood, a pioneering academic and who held top government jobs -- and even considered his own run for United States Senate in Massachusetts.

When the owner of Coed Sportswear in Newfields introduced Chris Sununu during a tour of the business a few weeks back, he included a line Sununu’s probably used to hearing by now. 

“He comes from a political family that has a long history of, from my perspective, making the right decisions for our country,” Mark Lane told his staff at the sportswear company, listing off one of several reasons he wanted Sununu to speak to them.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Among the Democrats running for governor this year is Executive Councilor Colin Van Ostern. He's a candidate who's no stranger to running political campaigns and is now seeking statewide office for the first time.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

“Keep it simple. Get it done.” That's the slogan Republican Ted Gatsas is using in his campaign for governor. It’s a theme the Manchester Mayor has turned to time and time again throughout his political career. 

Natasha Haverty

Senator Kelly Ayotte is in the middle of a competitive reelection bid this year.  In her six years in Washington she's quickly risen from the ranks of rookie politician to the national spotlight. But enough with that for the moment. We sent NHPR's State of Democracy reporter Natasha Haverty off the campaign trail, to see what Ayotte's daily working life is like on Capitol Hill. She sends this report.


via C-Span

Mark Connolly is running for Governor. Today, he runs his own small investment company. But his resume runs the spectrum from financial executive to deputy secretary of state.

There are a lot of reasons to run for office. Ideological convictions. Hunger for power. A sense of duty to serve. But Connolly seems driven by a desire to improve what he sees as the technical and structural weaknesses in Concord.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

There are four candidates in the 2016 gubernatorial Republican primary, most with several years’ experience in New Hampshire politics. Then there’s Frank Edelblut. The first-term state lawmaker from Wilton is casting himself as a business-savvy outsider who understands the evolving economy.

Josh Rogers/NHPR

Among the Democrats vying for the title of New Hampshire governor this year is former Portsmouth Mayor Steve Marchand. He's hoping his mix of political and fiscal experience will win over voters in the Democratic primary this September.

Paige Sutherland / NHPR

Sen. Jeanie Forrester, a Republican candidate for governor, holds one of the most powerful seats in the State House: She’s chair of the influential Senate Finance Committee, with a big say in how every state dollar is raised and spent.

But you won’t hear Forrester talk too much on the campaign trail about her work in Concord. Rather, Forrester is pitching herself as more community leader than State House insider.