2016 Conventions

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Even as she sat in the lobby of her hotel Thursday morning, hours before the convention was scheduled to gavel in, just a simple question was enough to move Judi Lanza to tears.

What would it be like for her, in the stands tonight, to watch Hillary Clinton accept the Democratic Party’s nomination?

NHPR's Casey McDermott is reporting this week from the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.  

Check this page frequently for updates, stories, photos, and to listen to live streaming coverage from the convention presented by NPR.

Click here for the live stream, which will broadcast coverage each day from 8 PM to 11 PM EST.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

To say that Pam Livengood made an impression on Hillary Clinton’s campaign might be an understatement.

The Keene resident first met Clinton last year, on the candidate’s first campaign visit to New Hampshire. At the time, she spoke up about how her family’s been affected by the state’s substance abuse crisis – she took over guardianship of her grandson a few years ago because of issues stemming from her daughter's drug addiction.

Amid furor over an email leak that revealed a bias against Bernie Sanders inside the Democratic National Committee, U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz announced Sunday she will step down as chair.

Wasserman Schultz will still open and close the convention, she said in a statement, and "address our delegates about the stakes involved in this election not only for Democrats, but for all Americans."

DARREN MCCOLLESTER / GETTY IMAGES

As the only New Hampshire superdelegate to support Sen. Bernie Sanders, state Sen. Martha Fuller Clark is nonetheless ready to unite around the Democratic Party's presumptive nominee, Hillary Clinton, heading into the general election.

Bringing the rest of the delegation on board, she says, might be more difficult.

It has been said that "to cleave" is the only verb in English that connotes one specific action and its direct opposite. To cleave sometimes means to hold together, and it can also mean to split apart.

That's why Cleveland was the perfect city to host the 2016 Republican National Convention. Because this week, in this town, the GOP demonstrated both its persistent divisions and its instinct for overcoming them.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Republican nominee Donald Trump will address his party’s convention in Cleveland tonight. New Hampshire delegates loyal to Donald Trump are looking forward to the speech. But plenty of other delegates will be looking away, or looking on from afar.

To hear Donald Trump delegate Steve Stepanek tell it, the Republican National Convention has done its job, and the matter is settled.

“We know we need Donald Trump as our next leader, and I think everybody understands this is what we need, this is where we go.”

Roundup: The Republican National Convention And Race (So Far)

Jul 21, 2016

In a year when the topic seems virtually unavoidable, race has been a major focus of coverage of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

There was the MSNBC panel Monday evening in which Iowa Rep. Steve King questioned whether nonwhites have made any contributions to civilization.

Jason Moon for NHPR

The Republican National Convention may be dominating the headlines. But following Senator Kelly Ayotte Wednesday morning, you wouldn’t know it.

Instead of spending the week in Cleveland, Ayotte was here in Portsmouth, touring a company that makes devices to treat cancer tumors with electrical fields.

NHPR Staff

U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte may be skipping the GOP convention this week, but there there is still plenty of politicking being done on her behalf. When Iowa Senator Joni Ernst addressed a breakfast hosted by the NH GOP, she spent roughly half her speech discussing Kelly Ayotte.

National security was front and center during the Republican National Convention's first night of programming.

Speaker after speaker bashed President Obama and his former secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, for the Obama administration's approach to fighting ISIS, immigration policies, and the 2012 attacks on diplomatic compounds in Benghazi, Libya.

Here are the facts and context behind several high-profile claims in Monday's speeches.

Via twitter.com/jepersing

New Hampshire’s Republican delegation is in Cleveland for day two of the party’s national convention.

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers is reporting from Cleveland this week. He spoke with Morning Edition's Rick Ganley about what they delegation is up to, and how they feel about what's transpired so far.

Chaos erupted on the floor on the first day of the Republican National Committee in Cleveland, as forces opposed to Donald Trump tried — and failed — to make one last stand.

Arkansas Rep. Steve Womack brought up the Rules Committee report, which would keep delegates bound to Trump. Anti-Trump forces began shouting and wanting a roll call vote in a last-ditch effort to unbind GOP delegates and let them vote their "conscience."

Clayton Allen, 21, walked right up to the 8-foot fence surrounding the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland.

He drove from Kentucky and he stood out from the crowd because he had a handgun strapped to his hip.

"I open-carry all the time," Allen said. "The Republican convention would not be the exception."

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers is reporting this week from the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

NPR also has a team of reporters on the ground.

Check this page frequently for updates, stories, photos, and to listen to live streaming coverage from the convention presented by NPR.

Click here for the live stream, which will broadcast coverage each day from 8 PM to 11 PM EST.

The Democrats on Friday released an outline of their upcoming convention, and one of the main goals appears to be showing off the party's unity after a long primary fight.

After a divisive primary season between presumptive nominee Hillary Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, the convention schedule includes a speech from Sanders on the first night, Monday, July 25. That night's theme is "United Together" — indeed, of the four nights' themes, three include the word "together."

Getting to next week's Republican National Convention in Cleveland has become more of a burden than some delegates were expecting. For one thing, some of them had no idea they'd be on the hook for the whole cost of casting a vote for their candidate.

One such delegate is Rita Gaus, who lives out among the cornfields and wind turbines about two hours south of Chicago in Buckingham, Ill. Gaus and her husband are dog breeders, something that started out as a hobby but has turned into a full-time gig on their family farm.