2016 Governor Race

NHPR staff

Ted Gatsas isn’t the first candidate for governor to take advantage of a gap in New Hampshire’s election law that allows wealthy donors to dodge limits on campaign contributions.

But no one has benefited more from the so-called LLC loophole than the Manchester mayor.

 

As New Hampshire students head back to school this week, education is on many parents’ minds. And with the gubernatorial primary less than two weeks away, candidates’ positions on these issues could play a major role on voters’ decisions. 

In this year’s governor’s race, the candidates’ views fall largely along party lines, with differences over how much and where to spend money.

There are three Democratic gubernatorial candidates this year, vying to be their party's nominee for governor.  We ask candidates Mark Connolly, Steve Marchand and Colin Van Ostern their views on some of the big issues facing our state: public education, energy prices, taxes, demographics, drug abuse and more.  The primary will be held September 13. 


Jason Moon for NHPR

Six of the seven candidates running for New Hampshire governor participated in a forum on young children today at Saint Anselm College.

The forum was sponsored by Spark NH, an advisory council of governor-appointed early childhood professionals. Attendees included business owners, early childhood professionals, and elected officials.

Mark Connolly

Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Mark Connolly says he won’t participate in an upcoming debate on WMUR-TV because of an ongoing labor dispute.

In a statement released this afternoon, Mark Connolly cited the dispute between the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 1228 and WMUR, saying that without an agreement in place, he would not participate. He called on his Democratic opponents to do the same.

If you’ve spent any time following the Republicans running for governor this year, you’ve probably heard plenty of talk about the need to jumpstart New Hampshire’s economy.

 New Hampshire Public Radio in partnership with the Business and Industry Association and New Hampshire Business Review present a forum between the Democratic and Republican nominees for governor.

The discussion will be moderated by Laura Knoy, host of The Exchange, and panelists will consist of journalists from NHBR and NHPR

NHPR

Democrat Colin Van Ostern and Republican Ted Gatsas are leading the cash race in the contest for governor.

Campaign finance reports filed Wednesday show Van Ostern has raised just over $1 million and Gatsas just below that amount, not including a $75,000 personal loan. The totals are significantly higher than their competitors. The primary is Sept. 13.

Republican Rep. Frank Edelblut has contributed $750,000 to his own campaign, giving him the highest cash on hand at this point.

Jason Moon for NHPR

The political arm of Planned Parenthood of Northern New England waded into the Democratic gubernatorial primary Tuesday morning when it endorsed Executive Councilor Colin Van Ostern. The move has exposed a disagreement among abortion rights activists over the role they should play in this election.

The Democratic candidates for governor took part in a WGIR radio debate Wednesday. Among other things, the candidates discussed marijuana legalization.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Each year since 2010, the conservative advocacy group Americans for Prosperity has asked New Hampshire candidates to sign onto a “pledge” vowing to cut taxes and spending, as well as to oppose the Affordable Care Act.

And usually, the Republicans running for governor are quick to sign on. That's not the case this year.

Jason Moon for NHPR

New Hampshire’s largest public employee labor union is throwing its weight behind Democrat Colin Van Ostern in his bid for governor. It’s the latest in a spate of union endorsements in the race.

There are at least a few things the four Republican candidates for governor can agree on.

All of them – State Representative Frank Edelblut, State Senator Jeanie Forrester, Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas and Executive Councilor Chris Sununu – say they want to make New Hampshire more “business friendly.” 

When the owner of Coed Sportswear in Newfields introduced Chris Sununu during a tour of the business a few weeks back, he included a line Sununu’s probably used to hearing by now. 

“He comes from a political family that has a long history of, from my perspective, making the right decisions for our country,” Mark Lane told his staff at the sportswear company, listing off one of several reasons he wanted Sununu to speak to them.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Among the Democrats running for governor this year is Executive Councilor Colin Van Ostern. He's a candidate who's no stranger to running political campaigns and is now seeking statewide office for the first time.

 Fourth of July events can draw huge crowds - and in an election year, those crowds can draw candidates. If you're looking to learn a little bit more about New Hampshire political hopefuls before you see them in parades or catch their ads on TV, NHPR's newsroom has something that might help.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

“Keep it simple. Get it done.” That's the slogan Republican Ted Gatsas is using in his campaign for governor. It’s a theme the Manchester Mayor has turned to time and time again throughout his political career. 

via C-Span

Mark Connolly is running for Governor. Today, he runs his own small investment company. But his resume runs the spectrum from financial executive to deputy secretary of state.

There are a lot of reasons to run for office. Ideological convictions. Hunger for power. A sense of duty to serve. But Connolly seems driven by a desire to improve what he sees as the technical and structural weaknesses in Concord.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

There are four candidates in the 2016 gubernatorial Republican primary, most with several years’ experience in New Hampshire politics. Then there’s Frank Edelblut. The first-term state lawmaker from Wilton is casting himself as a business-savvy outsider who understands the evolving economy.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

There's a wide fundraising gap between two of the Democrats hoping to become New Hampshire's next governor.

Candidates are not required to file campaign finance reports until Aug. 24, less than a month before the Sept. 13 primary. But Executive Councilor Colin Van Ostern and businessman Mark Connolly filed reports Wednesday, a deadline for non-candidate committees to file.

Josh Rogers/NHPR

Among the Democrats vying for the title of New Hampshire governor this year is former Portsmouth Mayor Steve Marchand. He's hoping his mix of political and fiscal experience will win over voters in the Democratic primary this September.

Paige Sutherland / NHPR

Sen. Jeanie Forrester, a Republican candidate for governor, holds one of the most powerful seats in the State House: She’s chair of the influential Senate Finance Committee, with a big say in how every state dollar is raised and spent.

But you won’t hear Forrester talk too much on the campaign trail about her work in Concord. Rather, Forrester is pitching herself as more community leader than State House insider.

Jason Moon for NHPR

It’s still about three months before New Hampshire Democrats decide who their party’s nominee for governor will be. But in pubs, coffee shops, and living rooms around the state the race is quietly picking up speed.

The people coming out to see the Democrats running for governor at this point in the race can be roughly divided into two groups:

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire's U.S. Senate race is, and is likely to remain, the state political race that gets the most attention. But the race for governor, which features crowded primaries among Republicans and Democrats and no big favorite, is also starting to crank up. Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition's Rick Ganley to talk about it.


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