2016 Republican Convention

It has been said that "to cleave" is the only verb in English that connotes one specific action and its direct opposite. To cleave sometimes means to hold together, and it can also mean to split apart.

That's why Cleveland was the perfect city to host the 2016 Republican National Convention. Because this week, in this town, the GOP demonstrated both its persistent divisions and its instinct for overcoming them.

Donald Trump laid out his vision to Republicans and the nation Thursday night as he accepted his party’s nomination.

For New Hampshire delegates loyal to Trump, Thursday was a chance to celebrate their candidate, their own improbable rise, and thumb their nose at elements of their party who doubted Trump. For many delegates who didn’t back Trump, it was a time to reassess.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Republican nominee Donald Trump will address his party’s convention in Cleveland tonight. New Hampshire delegates loyal to Donald Trump are looking forward to the speech. But plenty of other delegates will be looking away, or looking on from afar.

To hear Donald Trump delegate Steve Stepanek tell it, the Republican National Convention has done its job, and the matter is settled.

“We know we need Donald Trump as our next leader, and I think everybody understands this is what we need, this is where we go.”

Roundup: The Republican National Convention And Race (So Far)

Jul 21, 2016

In a year when the topic seems virtually unavoidable, race has been a major focus of coverage of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

There was the MSNBC panel Monday evening in which Iowa Rep. Steve King questioned whether nonwhites have made any contributions to civilization.

Jason Moon for NHPR

The Republican National Convention may be dominating the headlines. But following Senator Kelly Ayotte Wednesday morning, you wouldn’t know it.

Instead of spending the week in Cleveland, Ayotte was here in Portsmouth, touring a company that makes devices to treat cancer tumors with electrical fields.

NH Perspective: 2016 RNC Convention

Jul 20, 2016
NHPR

The Republican National Convention is underway in Cleveland, and Donald Trump is the party's official nominee for president, but not without pushback from some notable New Hampshire politicians. We get the Granite State perspective with New Hampshire political analysts discussing events and themes emerging from the convention, how they resonate with New Hampshire delegates and voters, and ramifications for "down-ticket" elections in the fall. We also preview the nominee's acceptance speech and the upcoming Democratic convention.


Kelli True / NHPR

Before the New Hampshire Primary, state Republican Party Chairwoman Jennifer Horn was outspoken in her criticism of Donald Trump, calling his comments about women "disrespectful" and his remark about Sen. John McCain not being a war hero "disgraceful."

She also called his proposed ban on foreign Muslims "un-American."

Now, Horn says she has no reservations about Trump, who Tuesday night became the Republican presidential nominee once the delegates cast their votes.

NHPR Staff

U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte may be skipping the GOP convention this week, but there there is still plenty of politicking being done on her behalf. When Iowa Senator Joni Ernst addressed a breakfast hosted by the NH GOP, she spent roughly half her speech discussing Kelly Ayotte.

National security was front and center during the Republican National Convention's first night of programming.

Speaker after speaker bashed President Obama and his former secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, for the Obama administration's approach to fighting ISIS, immigration policies, and the 2012 attacks on diplomatic compounds in Benghazi, Libya.

Here are the facts and context behind several high-profile claims in Monday's speeches.

Via twitter.com/jepersing

New Hampshire’s Republican delegation is in Cleveland for day two of the party’s national convention.

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers is reporting from Cleveland this week. He spoke with Morning Edition's Rick Ganley about what they delegation is up to, and how they feel about what's transpired so far.

New Hampshire Republican delegate Gordon Humphrey had some sharp words Monday to describe the way his party is managing its convention.

The former U.S. Senator was among a group of so-called Never Trump delegates trying to force a roll call vote on the proposed convention rules, leading to a chaotic scene on the first day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

The effort by Humphrey and others was ultimately shut down after the roll call was rejected following a series of voice votes.

Speaking to MSNBC afterward, Humphrey criticized the process.

Chaos erupted on the floor on the first day of the Republican National Committee in Cleveland, as forces opposed to Donald Trump tried — and failed — to make one last stand.

Arkansas Rep. Steve Womack brought up the Rules Committee report, which would keep delegates bound to Trump. Anti-Trump forces began shouting and wanting a roll call vote in a last-ditch effort to unbind GOP delegates and let them vote their "conscience."

Clayton Allen, 21, walked right up to the 8-foot fence surrounding the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland.

He drove from Kentucky and he stood out from the crowd because he had a handgun strapped to his hip.

"I open-carry all the time," Allen said. "The Republican convention would not be the exception."

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers is reporting this week from the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

NPR also has a team of reporters on the ground.

Check this page frequently for updates, stories, photos, and to listen to live streaming coverage from the convention presented by NPR.

Click here for the live stream, which will broadcast coverage each day from 8 PM to 11 PM EST.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

On the Political Front is our occasional check-in with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers.

Getting to next week's Republican National Convention in Cleveland has become more of a burden than some delegates were expecting. For one thing, some of them had no idea they'd be on the hook for the whole cost of casting a vote for their candidate.

One such delegate is Rita Gaus, who lives out among the cornfields and wind turbines about two hours south of Chicago in Buckingham, Ill. Gaus and her husband are dog breeders, something that started out as a hobby but has turned into a full-time gig on their family farm.