Airbnb

City officials in Portsmouth have upheld a decision to prohibit a couple from renting out a second home through AirBnB.

Portsmouth couple Matthew Beebe and Barbara Jenny bought the house next door with the intention that one day their daughter will live in it.

In the meantime, they planned to rent out the house through AirBnB. But before they got the chance, the city served them with a cease-and-desist letter.

The city says the home, which is in a residentially zoned area, can’t be used for short-term rentals without a special exemption.

People who rent out their homes through AirBnb in New Hampshire will soon have less paperwork to deal with.

Lodging booked through AirBnb is subject to the state’s rooms & meals tax just like any hotel.

Up until now, anyone using AirBnB to rent out a room or other space in their home has had to do things hotel owners have to do – get a tax license, collect the right amount of tax from each rental, and then submit that to the state each month.

Worries over lost tax revenue and neighborhood complaints have state and local officials grappling with how to regulate private rentals through online platforms such as Airbnb.

Screen grab from airbnb.com

While the debate about services like Airbnb is loudest in cities such as San Francisco and New York, it's also made inroads in less urban places like New Hampshire. We look at concerns over the lack of regulation, as well as the opportunities. Then, at the end of the hour, we'll discuss Uber, another major sharing economy company growing in the Granite State.
 

GUESTS:

The 'Sharing Economy': Uber & Airbnb Come To N.H.

Feb 2, 2015
Dr sanjeevkumar SinghEr / Flickr/CC

With the rise of services like Uber and Airbnb, more folks who would normally use city-regulated taxis or hotels are now using apps to connect with strangers for a ride or a place to stay. But while this new ‘sharing’ configuration may be cheaper and more efficient, some worry about safety, fairness, and the future of work.

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