All Things Considered

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Gov. Chris Sununu just made two announcements on equity issues at the state level. The state Department of Justice is launching a new civil rights unit. And the governor is forming a new advisory council on diversity and inclusion.

 

Peter Biello, host of All Things Considered, speaks with Andrew Smith, who will be involved in the new state efforts. Smith works in the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services. He works with groups in New Hampshire after racial incidents occur.

 

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At least 19 schools in New Hampshire get some of their energy from solar panels. And the panels in operation at Hopkinton Middle High School may be the oldest. 

Installed in 1999, these panels at the school don't work as well as they used to but they still work.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello speaks with Granite Geek David Brooks, who has been reporting on old solar panels in New Hampshire.

So what prompted you to try to find some of those old solar panels and schools in the state.

Allegra Boverman/NHPR

Before President Trump, candidates for the highest office in the country have disclosed some of their tax returns. There's currently no federal law requiring them to do so. Now one state lawmaker is considering crafting legislation that would require candidates to disclose their tax returns in order to be on the ballot in New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation presidential primary.

That lawmaker is Democratic Representative Suzanne Smith. She spoke earlier today with NHPR's Peter Biello.

When did you get the idea for this?

 

Lisa McCauley via Flickr / https://flic.kr/p/9VUmRa

The towns and cities on New Hampshire’s mostly white seacoast have mostly white police departments. The racial diversity among the police departments in the area differ by degrees, but several police chiefs agree that increasing the diversity of the police force is a goal worth pursuing.

Dover’s Police Chief Anthony Colarusso spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about efforts to create a more diverse police force.

This transcript has been edited for clarity. 

Jeff L via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/5t8J2D

An independent investigation revealed last week that there are more sex abuse allegations against former faculty and staff at Phillips Exeter Academy than previously thought. The allegations of sexually inappropriate behavior involved several students over a period that began in 1966.

Hadley Barndollar has been covering this story for the Portsmouth Herald. She joins NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk about these new revelations.

Future In Sight via Caitlin Drown

New Hampshire Association for the Blind announced today that it’s getting a new name. It will be called Future In Sight. The organization’s president and CEO David Morgan says the new name better represents how the organization addresses the needs of the community.

David Morgan spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss the change and how they plan to serve the community.

This transcript has been edited for clarity. 

Tell us, what need in the community is your organization addressing that warrants changing the organization’s name?

The Insitute via Flikr / https://flic.kr/p/bjqoJR

The science fair has been a staple of science education for decades. But recently the loss of Intel, the computer chip giant, as a sponsor of the International Science and Engineering Fair is prompting some soul searching about the purpose of this educational mainstay. Do these science fairs, complete with a tri-fold poster board, really help students learn the kinds of things that prepare them for today’s science-based challenges?

Omid Moghimi

Just a few weeks ago NHPR’s Peter Biello spoke with Dr. Omid Moghimi, whose wife was stuck in the final stages of applying for a green card when President Donald Trump issued his executive order banning travel from seven Muslim-majority nations.

Now that the ban has been suspended, Dorsa Razi has been able to come to the United States. It's a happy conclusion to an uncertain situation, and Omid is back on the program to talk about the experience.

This transcript has been edited for clarity. 

Zvonimir Cuvalo via Flikr / https://flic.kr/p/QQarge

During winter’s dark months you may feel a little bit down. It’s common for people to feel sadder during the winter months, but that sadness isn’t always considered seasonal affective disorder, which is the official term for depression brought on by the cold winter days.

Concord Monitor reporter David Brooks is hosting Concord's Science Café all about seasonal affective disorder, and spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about the disorder and how it’s nothing like your typical case of “the winter blues”.

This transcript has been edited for clarity.
 

Omid Moghimi

President Donald Trump’s executive order barring people from seven majority-Muslim countries for 90 days has had ripple effects here in New Hampshire. Among those impacted is Omid Moghimi. He is an Iranian-American citizen and a medical resident at Dartmouth-Hitchcock. And he has been trying to bring his wife Dorsa Razi to the United States for a year and a half now.

He joins NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk about their situation.

This transcript has been edited for clarity.

GEOFF FORESTER / Concord Monitor

Any parent will tell you that parenting is a difficult job. Being a parent when you’re in prison makes that job even harder.

Reporter Alyssa Dandrea of the Concord Monitor recently reported on what it’s like to parent from prison. And she joins NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk about the challenges these parents face and her series.

This transcript has been edited for clarity.

Ray Theriault / Flikr

Patents help put a stamp of ownership on a piece of technology or an idea.  Concord Monitor reporter David Brooks got curious recently and wondered which New Hampshire towns have the most patent-holding residents per thousand.  He crunched some numbers and shared what he found with NHPR's Peter Biello.

This transcript has been edited for clarity. 

So David, you didn’t look at every town in the state, did you?

No, there’s a limit to how much Excel I’m going to do for an article.

Bas van Dijk via Flickr CC

Here’s a fun fact about mathematicians: they love chalkboards.  Especially the old fashioned ones, with actual chalk and those dusty erasers.  There are a variety of reasons why this might be true, and to untangle them we turn to David Brooks. He’s a reporter for the Concord Monitor and writer at granitegeek.org, and a regular guest on NHPR’s All Things Considered.

Transcript has been edited for clarity.

So before we get into the reasons why mathematicians really love chalkboards, tell us why are we even talking about this.

PSNH / Flikr

The Department of Defense has awarded 80 million dollars to fund a new Bio Research and Manufacturing Institute in Manchester. The institute will focus on bio-manufacturing tissue and organs, particularly for those in the armed services, and plans to establish New Hampshire as a hub for scientific innovation.

The coalition running this institute includes DEKA Research & Development Corporation, Dartmouth-Hitchcock, and the University of New Hampshire.

Most of the batteries we use in our daily life are made from chemicals, and many of those chemicals are toxic.  Researchers at the University of New Hampshire are working with technology that uses water instead of those toxic chemicals.  Water has not been a great material for building a battery, but this research may change that. 

University of New Hampshire on Facebook

As a reporter, Bob Woodward has written the first draft of history on some of this country’s most important events. In 1973, his coverage of the Watergate Scandal with Carl Bernstein for The Washington Post was instrumental in uncovering corruption that led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon.  Woodward was also The Washington Post’s lead reporter for the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  

Granite Geek: How to Monitor Space Weather

Nov 30, 2016
UNH

If regular people ever get to travel to space, we’ll have to contend with something astronauts already worry about: space weather. That weather comes in the form of something called “solar wind”, which is generated by the charged particles thrown off by the sun. It can affect satellites, our atmosphere here on Earth, and any space travelers.