Amazon

Changes To Net Neutrality Laws On The Table, Again

Dec 1, 2017

Next week, the Federal Communications Commission will vote on a proposal to reverse current rules governing internet service providers like Comcast or Verizon.  We examine what it might mean for those who create on-line content, those who distribute it, and customers seeking information and entertainment.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: October 20, 2017

Oct 20, 2017

The Granite State makes a pitch for Amazon "H.Q. Two," and the governor reverses course on commuter rail. And why the no-show for Keno?  Hearings on the electronic bingo game Keno are noticeably empty.  We also talk about how the opioid crisis is affecting the Manchester mayoral race.

Rodrigo Buendia/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg captured 2 percent in a preference poll ahead (way, way, way ahead) of the 2020 New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary.

The UNH Survey Center asked people to pick from a list of "potential candidates" that the pollster provided.  By the way, Zuckerberg has repeatedly said he is not running. 

Moving on.

Other N.H. notables and stories this week:

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Will a former apple orchard in Londonderry be home to Amazon’s next headquarters?

New Hampshire state officials on Wednesday released their proposal to lure the online retail giant's new “HQ2” to the state, putting forward the 603-acre mixed use development called Woodmont Commons as the best option.

Boston commuter cities like Nashua are jumping on the chance to develop a private passenger rail, after years of unsuccessful campaigning for a public rail system. New Hampshire's zoning ordinances and city planning processes are drawing criticism for their contribution to the current over-priced housing market. And millennials get their own commission to help the state appeal to a younger population. 


Earlier this month, Amazon announced plans to build what it’s calling an ‘HQ2.’ The online book seller-turned-online superstore has outgrown its Seattle headquarters, and it’s now accepting proposals from cities and states for a second home or sorts: one which would house as many as 50,000 employees.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ political donations are not all tethered to one party. This holds true in New Hampshire, which plans to submit an underdog bid for the online retailer’s second headquarters.

The Amazon PAC has contributed to a Sununu -- former U.S. Sen. John E. Sununu, the governor’s brother. The PAC gave $2,000 to the former Senator in the 2008 campaign. It donated $1,000 in 2004 to the Daniel Webster PAC, the senator's leadership PAC at the time.

Other Amazon PAC donations, according to Federal Election Commission finance reports, include:

Gov. Chris Sununu is continuing to beat the drum for Amazon’s attention — in media interviews, at least — as the online shopping giant scouts out a second location for its headquarters.

New Hampshire is considering adding its name to the list of states making a pitch for Amazon's proposed second company headquarters.  

 Taylor Caswell, commissioner of the New Hampshire Department of Business and Economic Affairs, says the "Live Free Or Die" state's quality of life and tax advantages -- including no state income tax -- could be one of the incentives.

U.S. Embassy Kyiv Ukraine via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/epy8go

The holidays are fast approaching, and for the procrastinators among us, the online retailer Amazon.com offers a ray hope. But what if the gift you've purchased isn't what it claims to be? Today, the supply and demand chain for counterfeit goods

Then, in the early days of cinema, soundtracks were played live.  A single pianist or orchestra accompanied those early silent films with sometimes written and sometimes improvised, music and sound effects. The Alloy Orchestra keeps that tradition alive by live scoring old silent films using state of the art electronics, and...a rack of junk. 

Global Panorama via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/r2nw3q

Someone suffering from a major depressive episode may have trouble getting out of bed - sleep too much during the day, and then suffer from insomnia at night. Today, an experimental, and counter-intuitive treatment for depression.

Plus, the benefits of being bored. Whether we're sitting quietly for a cup of coffee, or taking a walk without a destination, one author argues that setting aside time to do nothing can make us more creative, and teach us more about who we really are - she even has some handy tips for how foster a bit of boredom.

Jeremy Weber via flickr Creative Commons

Tesla cars…Louis Vuitton luggage…Philippe Patek watches…luxury brands are selling well. How about a $10,000 cell phone? On today’s show, we’ll learn about the new handcrafted cell phone with optional concierge service that’s become a new symbol of conspicuous consumption.

Also today, from fierce fighters in the Trojan wars to Wonder Woman, Amazons have been described as figures of myth. A classics scholar sifts through new DNA evidence and other proof that these female warriors on horseback were real.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Picking out a movie can be a lot like browsing the cereal aisle - the more options you have, the harder it is to decide what to watch.  It's especially difficult for subscription-based services like Netflix and Amazon Prime, which offer you more programming than you can even browse in one sitting. In our monthly segment "On Demand", we help make movie night memorable by offering our favorite films and shows being made available this month.

Picking out a movie can be a lot like browsing the cereal aisle - the more options you have, the harder it is to decide what to watch.  It's an especially difficult process for subscription-based services like Netflix and Amazon Prime, which offer you more programming than you can even browse in one sitting. As if that wasn't hard enough, these services are constantly adding and removing dozens of titles with little to no warning. In our monthly segment "On Demand", we  aim to help you make your movie nights memorable by offering our favorite movies and shows being made available this month. 

Amazon.com is one-stop shopping for Kindle downloads, on demand movies, and illegal prescription drugs? Today on Word of Mouth: steroids, painkillers, and antibiotics delivered right to your door. Then, if you’re bored by life in your cubicle, why not watch someone else’s…in Russia? A look at Opentopia, a curiously popular website that provides access to webcams across the world. Plus, we get the history behind a beloved New England trademark: the summer home.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

How SNHU Is Edging Out Its Competition Online

May 9, 2014

  The week started with the news of Southern New Hampshire University’s new $10,000 bachelor’s degree program. Recent undergraduate enrollment numbers show the small, Manchester school is now equal in size to UNH in Durham, with a vast majority of its students online. 

xsas via Flickr Creative Commons

Tom Holbrook is the co-owner and manager of the independent RiverRun Bookstore in Portsmouth and one of our partners for the writers on a New England Stage series.  Tom recently sent out an email saying “why I’m not going to complain about Amazon anymore” to the more than 2500 members of RiverRun’s e-mail list. Word of Mouth Senior Producer Rebecca Lavoie tracked Tom down to find out what was behind it. We have a copy of Tom's email posted on our Facebook page, Word of Mouth Radio.

MeneerDijk via Flickr Creative Commons

It’s been a pretty big couple of weeks for Amazon.com.  First, President Obama chose one of the company’s fulfillment centers as a backdrop for a speech on raising the minimum wage.  Then, news broke that Amazon’s founder, billionaire Jeff Bezos, had purchased the venerable Washington Post.  Amazon now has one hundred and twenty-six million monthly users.  But they might want to start reading product reviews with a grain of salt.  Cited as the largest single source of internet consumer reviews in 2010, the online giant is susceptible to a deceitful practice called astroturfing.  When Susan Crawford’s book “Captive Audience” about the Telecom Industry was published in January, it attached a number of bad reviews later revealed to be fake…with a political agenda behind them.  Our guest Mike Masnick weeded out these fake reviews and published an expose for Techdirt that reached the front page of Reddit.  Masnick is the founder and CEO of Floor64 and editor of the Techdirt blog, we spoke with him about his findings.