Andy Sanborn

Lauren Chooljian / NHPR

  The field of candidates trying to replace retiring Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter is crowded, to say the least. There are over a dozen people running for the 1st Congressional seat, and this district is notorious for swinging back and forth between the two parties.

NHPR’s Lauren Chooljian spent some time this week watching the three main Republican candidates to see how they’re trying to distinguish themselves from one another. She spoke with NHPR's All Things Considered host Peter Biello.

Lauren Chooljian for NHPR

Allegations that New Hampshire Republican state Senator Andy Sanborn made inappropriate comments at the State House are following him on the campaign trail for Congress.

Sanborn is among a handful of Republicans running to replace retiring Democratic Rep. Carol Shea-Porter in the 1st Congressional District. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Newly released documents indicate that New Hampshire state Senate leaders reassigned a staffer under the supervision of Bedford senator and congressional candidate Andy Sanborn in 2014 amid concerns over inappropriate comments. 

The AG last month cleared Sanborn and found no wrongdoing when it investigated the possible bribing of a former Senate intern who had been the target of a suggestive joke.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Bedford State Senator and Republican congressional candidate Andy Sanborn said allegations about his conduct at the Statehouse are being blown out of proportion by local media — despite a recent finding from the New Hampshire Attorney General's office that he did use "inappropriate language" toward a legislative intern in 2013.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

In this Race for the 1st conversation, Laura talks with Andy Sanborn, a Republican running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Sanborn is a state senator and current chairman of the Senate Ways and Means and Election Law & Internal Affairs committees. 

Our Race for the First conversations will focus on the issues at the forefront in the CD1 race, including opioids, guns, veterans, and how each candidate plans to stand out in a crowded race. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The New Hampshire Attorney General's office revealed on Tuesday that a grand jury had been convened to look into whether a former state Senate intern received a cash payment and a job “in exchange for the intern’s silence regarding an inappropriate comment” made by Sen. Andy Sanborn.

Robert Garrova for NHPR

A bill that would limit state-funded adult education programs to legal residents cleared the Senate last week.

 

Republican Senator Andy Sanborn is the primary sponsor of SB 525. He contends it will focus taxpayer funding on those who can work legally in the state.

 

Sanborn pointed out during a Senate session last week that the bill is not meant to target those on a path to citizenship.

State Senator Andy Sanborn at a political event at The Draft, the bar and restaurant he owns in Concord

A top State House leader said this week that an incident involving a sitting senator prompted him to seek the advice of an outside law firm, a process that spurred a larger overhaul of the New Hampshire Legislature’s anti-harassment policy several years ago.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Republican State Senator and 1st District Congressional Candidate Andy Sanborn has acknowledged his use of “crass language” in early 2013 prompted an internal review involving the Senate’s legal counsel and then-Senate President.

www.andysanborn.com

State Senator Andy Sanborn has announced a bid for Congress.

The Republican from Bedford says he'll run for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional seat, which is currently held by Democrat Carol Shea-Porter.

josh rogers/nhpr

The Senate Ways and Means committee has adopted revenue figures for the next state budget.

The numbers are higher than the senate's earlier forecasts, but about $20 million shy of what Governor Sununu proposed.

In the context of a $12 billion dollar budget, a $20 million difference may seem small, but reaching agreement was a challenge.

The final vote added $53 million dollars to what the senate projected last week by bumping up estimates on businesses taxes, real estate transfers, and the tax on interests and dividends.