Apple

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“Apple Pay” came out of the gate with great fanfare and claims that the mobile-payment system will make purchasing easier and more secure.  On today’s show, a closer scan of Apple Pay and find out who is set to benefit – and who is not.

And, from traffic cams to EZ Pass, big brother is riding along with us more than we think. But just how much are drivers being monitored? And, after a week of historic wins and losses, we’ll sample the art of the concession speech.

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Apple Pay: Yea Or Nay?

Nov 3, 2014
Modified photo Bart via flickr Creative Commons

For those who have wallets bursting at the seams with payment and loyalty cards, this scenario may sound familiar: You’re out shopping, you bring your items to the cash register and face the quick mental calculus of which card to use? Visa? Mastercard? Debit? The store issued credit card? Well, Apple proposes to solve all that with a swipe, provided you have an i-Phone 6, or 6 Plus that is. Two weeks ago today, Apple unveiled its latest creation: Apple Pay, a mobile payment system it claims will make purchasing easier and more secure. Some major retailers aren’t having it, but why?

Modified version of Chris Harrison photo via flickr Creative Commons

Two weeks ago Apple Pay was unveiled with great fanfare and claims that the mobile-payment system will make purchasing easier and more secure. On today’s show, a closer scan of Apple Pay to find out who is set to benefit from it.

Then, if you’re at a loss to describe something in English, why not turn to the language that brought you zeitgeist and schadenfreude?  We’ll explore compound German words uniquely outfitted for life’s everyday pleasures, pains, and unnamed oddities.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

charliesalina/jtprattmedia via Flickr Creative Commons

Patent wars are now standard in the tech industry, so is fierce competition for markets. But what would happen if two Silicon Valley superpowers made the jump to all-out war?

“Though the feud with Apple has been escalating for months, Google CEO Larry Page has never given serious consideration to the plan known internally as Operation GhostFruit. Then Apple decided to test him, first by removing Google as the default search engine on the iPhone and iPad, and then …by blocking Apple devices’ access to Google.com entirely. Larry Page has no choice but to go nuclear.”

That’s an excerpt from Slate’s totally fictional, not remotely thought out experiment called “Wargames: Apple Versus Google,” a highly entertaining ten-part series imagining what might if happen if the two behemoths used all their power, resources, and money to destroy each other. Matt Yglesias is Slate's Business and Economics Correspondent and he spoke with us about the potential battle: Google vs. Apple.

Photo Credit Michael Kappel, Via Flickr Creative Commons

But we begin with news from the world of computing…the cult of Steve Jobs is a buzz over remarks made by Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak last week at the Entel Technology Conference in Chile.

Photo by Robert S. Donovan via Flickr Creative Commons

Apple’s new CEO Tim Cook has touched down in China.

We begin with the implications of man-made beings in the 21st century, and some potential legal questions recently posed by New Hampshire attorney John Weaver.

At the end of 2011, Apple had a very enviable problem. It's not too many companies that have more cash than they know what to do with, and for the electronics giant, that amounted to nearly $100 billion burning a hole in its pocket.

So it certainly pleased current and potential investors when Apple announced that, for the first time since the mid-1990s, the company will start paying a dividend.

Apple's new iPad goes on sale this Friday, the latest version of a wildly popular product from an iconic company. In the past couple of months, though, Apple has come under criticism for working conditions in Chinese factories that help build iPads.

A New York Times investigation focused on an explosion at an Apple supplier factory last May. In December, another explosion struck a different Apple supplier factory in Shanghai.

Apple has about 47,000 workers in the U.S. That's not a huge amount for such a profitable and influential company. Now the tech giant is saying it has actually created about 10 times that many jobs indirectly.

Some economists are skeptical of the claim. And the move comes as Apple is facing increased criticism and scrutiny over labor practices at factories it outsources to in China.

Audits of working conditions are under way at Foxconn's manufacturing plants in China, a key link in Apple's supply chain of iPhones, iPads and other devices. The effort will include visits to at least three sites, "each with more than 100,000 workers," says Auret Van Heerden, president of the Fair Labor Association.

"So we've taken a representative sample of over 35,000 workers," Van Heerden tells All Things Considered co-host Robert Siegel, in an interview airing Wednesday.

Caremore, a company that has revolutionized eldercare - providing better care and doing it profitably.  The "next big thing" prediction for Apple - under new leadership.  And 18th century explorers who fearlessly set out to catalog the variety of species that roam the earth.