Arts and Culture

The Audio Orchard for December

Nov 29, 2012
Kr. B. via Flickr Creative Commons

The Audio Orchard explores music being made right here in New England, and introduces you to artists that find their way here while on tour. Each month, we hand pick a variety of songs to sample. Click HERE to listen and download on Soundcloud, or click the "Podcast" link on the right of this page for iTunes. Happy Listening!

UPDATE: I'm not a big fan of email subscriptions because they usually end up spamming your inbox, but if you want me to email you ONCE A MONTH when my new podcast is out you can sign up here, and that way you'll never miss it! Thanks!

njtrout_2000 via Flickr Creative Commons

In 2002, Concord Monitor writer Mike Pride received a letter in the mail mentioning two pieces of authentic Civil War correspondence. A Civil War buff since he was a teenager, Mike soon discovered that New Hampshire was teeming with historic accounts of the soldiers and families that served in the Union Army. 

http://www.mergingartsproductions.com

The 2012 Short Short Story Film Festival comes to New Hampshire Technical Institute’s Sweeney Auditorium in Concord this Friday and Saturday. Now in its sixth year, the festival explores a form of film-making that values depth and story over screen-time.

New Hampshire officials are hoping to start showing tourists the cultural side of a state best known for outdoor activities.

Skiing. Hiking. Kayaking. Fall foliage.

All things for which the state is known.

But tourism and cultural resource officials want to broaden that and make sure tourists know more about cultural activities.

They’re holding a series of statewide meetings at cultural spots around the state. That included Tuesday morning at the Littleton Opera House. 

The Audio Orchard Podcast for November

Nov 13, 2012
Kr. B. via Flickr Creative Commons

THE AUDIO ORCHARD NOVEMBER PLAYLIST

The Audio Orchard explores music being made right here in New England, and introduces you to artists that find their way here while on tour. Each month, we hand pick a variety of songs to sample. You can download this podcast here and listen at your leisure.

Free To Be...You And Me

Forty years ago this month, the groundbreaking cultural phenomenon Free To Be…You And Me found its way into the collective subconscious of children across America.

Pickersgill Reef via Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire is better known for a tradition of community theater than for comedy.  Still, there is something of a comedy scene here…if you’re willing to look for it. Producer Adam McCune happens to be a regular at one of Manchester’s regular open-mic events, and brings us along in search of a laugh.

And check out Jay Chanoine's website here.

Chrissy Olson via Flickr Creative Commons

Jeffrey Alford is an adventurous sort. He left his Wyoming home in the late 1970's with very little money and began traveling in Asia. He funded his travels by smuggling gold and hawking jewelry before meeting another restless spirit named Naomi Duguid on a Tibetan rooftop in 1985. The two vagabonds got married, had two sons, and turned their love of Asia and its foods into a career of travel, writing and photography.

Zach Nugent / NHPR

Schooled in jazz and infatuated with pop… the Brooklyn based band Lake Street Dive came together at the New England Conservatory with a goal to play improvised, avant-garde country music. Think Loretta Lynn meets Ornette Coleman. Yeah, it sounded about as rough as it is to imagine.

cbclove via Flickr Creative Commons

You may have heard that the city of Concord is contemplating designs for a major overhaul of it’s downtown. Tonight, the Central New Hampshire bicycling coalition is hosting an event called Bike-toberfest at Red River Theatres in Concord. The idea is to bring people together to talk about how bike transportation could fit into the design, and to view some short films featuring bicycles.

sskennel via Flickr Creative Commons

This Saturday, Virginia will be hosting TEDx Amoskeag Millyard… a satellite TED event at the Millyard in Manchester. The theme is  co-innovation, and the presenters include thought leaders in business, education, and the arts, including our guest, John Herman.  He’s a filmmaker, stage producer, and a finalist candidate for Spaceflight, and last but not least, a full time high school English teacher.

OpenEye via Flickr Creative Commons

If you have never heard of Ingrid Michaelson, don’t worry… chances are you have heard her music. Whether it was during an Old Navy sweater commercial…or on TV shows like One Tree Hill, Army Wives, or most frequently, Grey’s Anatomy. Her brand of accessible and emotional indie-pop has made her music a go-to for soundtrack supervisors… and since, built her a grassroots army of fans devoted to each of her five studio albums.  Her latest is called Human Again

Ingrid + Grey's= Tears

Marxchivist via Flickr Creative Commons

Author, essayist, and staff writer for The New Yorker Susan Orlean takes vivid snapshots of people who live way off the beaten path.

Once Upon A Midnight Dreary...

Oct 11, 2012
Yeliseev / Flickr Creative Commons

Here is Sean Hurley's unabridged reading of "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe. Enjoy!

Auntie P via Flickr Creative Commons

For storytellers, horror fans and high school teachers,  Poe is an American original, who shocked the genteel readers of his day with tales of premature death, torture and reanimation. But this is 2012 – the age of Twilight, The Hunger Games, The Jersey Shore and Kim Kardashian …where every chapter is a cliffhanger, and a twenty-two minute episode is considered long-form narrative.  So, The Word of Mouth team asked around… are the works of Edgar Allen Poe still scary today?

and

Poe Was Totally Steampunk

Oct 11, 2012
Rebecca Lavoie

One of the events that took place earlier this week at the Bosacwen Public Library was the Edgar Allan Poe Steampunk Workshop which linked Poe’s artistry to the “steam-punk” subculture that is quickly growing  among fans of fantasy fiction and Japanese animation. 

We asked a variety of people, including Laura Knoy, Salman Rushdie, Neil Gaiman, and some adorable kids whether they think Edgar Allan Poe's work still stands up as "scary." Here's the full version of what they had to say about that...

The Last Days of Poe/The Raven

Oct 11, 2012
mikeyexists via Flickr Creative Commons

The last days of Edgar Allan Poe’s life are shrouded in mystery, much like his own work. And to arrive at those last fateful days, you must go back in Poe’s life to set the scene.  He was an orphan, adopted by the Allan family. He grew up well educated and well off, but once he left home for college, his relationship with his foster father grew tumultuous and he was – as they say - cut off.  Poe also had a taste for alcohol and women… and could never seem to balance the two. 

Fort Meade via Flickr Creative Commons

Games have emerged from the rec room and found a place in the classroom, onto cellphones, advertising, and as we’ll hear, into activism, relationships, and the way we view the world. Colleen Macklin is working to make us more game-literate. She designs games based not on winning or losing, but on learning and experiencing the creative, social and political universe outside the screen.

xlibber via Flickr Creative Commons

Producer's note: Unfortunately, technical difficulties on Tom's end prevented him from being able to join us for this segment...but as he's one of our favorite writers, we will make every attempt to get him on the program soon! /RL

623 via Flickr Creative Commons

Part 1: Data's Dirty Little Secret

sameold2010 via Flickr Creative Commons

Part 1: The Bad Science of the Left/Tweeting Political Poems

Think the right has cornered the market on denying science? No way, says Alex Berezow. He has a Ph.D. in microbiology and is co-author of the book Science Left Behind: Feel Good Falacies and the Rise of the Anti-Scientific Left. 

and

Fatoumata Diawara

Sep 27, 2012
retorta_net via Flickr Creative Commons

West African singer-songwriter Fatoumata Diawara has a back story not unlike many of today’s cosmopolitan Africans. She was born in Ivory Coast to parents from Mali and now lives in Paris. She’s a stage and film actress, singer, and songwriter. There's a world of experience that shines through on her album ‘Fatou’ which plays to her roots, but retains an infectious western pop sensibility.  Fatoumata and her band are playing tonight at the Dana Center, St.

Unicorns, Nessie, Big Foot...Oh My!

Sep 26, 2012
VeniceVandal via Flickr Creative Commons

A replica of Bigfoot, a display case dedicated to lake monsters, and the “mystery cat corner” are a few of the sights to see at Portland, Maine’s International Cryptozoology Museum. A little bit oddity, a little bit kitsch, it’s the type of place you might find by walking down a random alley... lucky for us, our adventurous producer Zach Nugent took that walk, and brings us this audio field trip.

The famous Patterson-Gimlin film:

This Friday, a new documentary will premiere in New Hampshire’s White Mountains. See What’s Whispered tells the story of artist David Baker. Baker came to the town of Jackson in 1946. He went on to make his name locally with a roadside gallery and studio on route 16 that he continued working in until the 1990s. Film maker Judy Faust says he became well known well beyond the Mt. Washington Valley not only for his work, but for the way he and his wife welcomed all. 

Part 1: Big Fundraiser Flame-Out, Circa 1884

Later this week...

Sep 11, 2012
Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Virginia and be attending the PRPD conference this week, and will be airing some vintage episodes of Word of Mouth. Never fear, though, we'll be back live on the air on Monday.

Doing Whatever It Takes...

Sep 10, 2012
Sara Hallie Richardson by Robbie Kanner

The unsteady path of an artist is never an easy one. Especially in today’s ambiguous economy, the choice to reject a  steady paycheck or conventional job is all the more difficult to justify. One Portland, Maine-based songwriter has made that conundrum into a source of inspiration. Zach Nugent takes us on a radio field trip to meet Sara Hallie Richardson.

Inspired Lives: Poet Maxine Kumin

Sep 5, 2012

Maxine Kumin’s career has spanned over half a century. She's the recipient of  awards such as the Pulitzer Prize, the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, and an American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters Award. Kumin was the poetry consultant for the Library of Congress in 1981-1982, and has taught at many of the country’s most prestigious universities, including MIT, Princeton, and Columbia. Despite traveling away from home to lecture at schools and universities around the United States, Kumin has retained close ties with her farmhouse in rural New Hampshire.

Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Part 1: Chasing Lightning/Birth Photography

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