Bernie Sanders

Kate Brindley for NHPR

At a CNN town hall forum in Derry Wednesday night, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton defended collecting $675,000 in fees for three speeches she made to Goldman Sachs.

Clinton says she made speeches to lots of groups and pushed back against the idea that the money she made would influence her.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

At campaign stops in Henniker and Hooksett on Wednesday, Texas Senator Ted Cruz riffed heavily on his ideas for reforming Washington, directing plenty of anger at the so-called political establishment.

And in this way, the Republican presidential candidate said he’s found some common ground with Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, one of his Democratic rivals.

Jason Moon for NHPR

After a close finish in Iowa, both remaining Democratic presidential contenders - Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders - headed straight for the Granite State yesterday.

 

They each came claiming a victory.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

New Hampshire voters head to the polls next week with plenty to think about. And many of them have been thinking, comparing, contrasting, deciding, and un-deciding on candidates for a while now. NHPR has been following up with a handful of voters through the campaign to hear how their final decisions have been shaped by a long primary season. Today we hear from three of them.


AP/John Minchillo

In the final week of the New Hampshire presidential primary, NHPR is taking a closer listen to how some of the candidates are pitching themselves to the state's voters – through their standard stump speech. We've taken a few key moments in a recent speech and marked up the sound in each clip - just click listen to see them roll out. 

Here's an annotated recording of a recent speech by Democrat Bernie Sanders, delivered January 14, 2016 at Dartmouth's Spaulding Auditorium. (You can hear the full speech using the player at the bottom of this story.)

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign has a challenge ahead of it before Primary Day.

The Vermont senator gets some of his strongest support in New Hampshire from independents. But those same voters could, at the last minute, decide to cast a ballot in the Republican primary.

Bernie Sanders may be running an unconventional campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination. But to close the sale with New Hampshire voters, he has put his money on a rather conventional means: television advertising.

NHPR file photos

With every day that passes leading up to the New Hampshire primary, the pressure builds on Republican presidential hopefuls looking to make a splash here.


Kate Brindley for NHPR

The UNH Survey Center turned plenty of heads this week with its latest poll on the New Hampshire Democratic primary. The poll, conducted for WMUR and CNN, had Bernie Sanders leaping even further ahead of Hillary Clinton, now leading 60 to 33 percent.

The poll did come with a few caveats. 

Andrew Burton/Getty Images

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joined Morning Edition to talk about Sunday night's Democratic debate and Republican Ted Cruz's big push here in New Hampshire.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

How do you define an attack ad? Is Hillary Clinton attacking Bernie Sanders, in her most recent ad? In it, she declares “It's time to pick a side, either we stand with the gun lobby, or we join the president and stand up to them.”

Kate Brindley for NHPR

 

Bernie Sanders casts himself as the voice of anti-establishment politics. But he's also a 25-year veteran of Congress.

Democratic rival Hillary Clinton is trying to draw attention to Sanders' record on gun control and health care. The strategy aims to point out the rare inconsistencies in his voting record that could clash with the anti-establishment brand he's cultivated during the presidential campaign.

 

Bernie Sanders has been outspending rival Hillary Clinton on ads just as the Democratic presidential race appears to be tightening and voters are tuning in.

In the past three weeks, Sanders' campaign has spent $4.7 million on ads to Clinton's $3.7 million. According to advertising tracker Kantar Media's CMAG, that means 1,000 more Sanders commercials than Clinton ads on broadcast TV.

The Sanders ad burst is coinciding with his rise in preference polls in Iowa and New Hampshire.

Jason Moon for NHPR

In the lobby of the Radisson hotel in downtown Manchester, high school and college students find themselves thrust into a microcosm of the New Hampshire primary. Several presidential campaigns from both parties are here, along with a slew of political professionals, advocacy groups, and other card-carrying political junkies. Stickers, buttons, and email lists are everywhere. There are even cardboard cut-outs of several presidential candidates spread throughout the room.

AP

While campaigning at New England College today, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders spoke of student debt and other domestic policies. His proposals include providing health care for all Americans and free tuition at public colleges. But how will these be paid for? Sen. Sanders spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello about this policy idea, and much more. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Bernie Sanders generally passes up opportunities to take a dig at Democratic presidential rival Hillary Clinton. And he preaches the virtues of an issue-driven campaign. But Donald Trump clearly gets under his skin.

Sanders says time after time, the Republican front-runner "just comes up with things off the top of his head — that are lies."

And now the Vermont senator says Trump should stop talking about Bill Clinton's sexual history and start worrying about climate change, the minimum wage and tax breaks for rich people like Trump himself.

While Hillary Clinton enjoys wide support in the Democratic presidential race across much of the country, in New Hampshire, Sen. Bernie Sanders still poses a threat. In Portsmouth Tuesday, Clinton spoke to a crowd that included voters weighing both candidates.

Sen. Bernie Sanders' quest to win the Democratic presidential nomination has come a long way since the Vermont senator formally entered the race in late May.

Allegra Boverman | Kate Harper

The fight late last week among Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton and the Democratic National Committee seems to have simmered down.

The DNC censured Sanders' campaign for improperly getting access to confidential voter data from Clinton's team. The restrictions have since been lifted, but the incident shone a light on a little known, but critical aspect of the 2016 presidential race: how candidates use data to identify, reach and influence potential supporters.

This post was updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign has filed a lawsuit against the Democratic National Committee to regain access to the committee's voter file. The DNC blocked the campaign from the resource Friday after a Sanders staffer accessed data collected and organized by Hillary Clinton's campaign.

The three Democratic presidential candidates will take the stage at Saint Anselm College Saturday night for their next debate.

This will be New Hampshire’s first debate of the primary season.

And while polls show a tight Democratic race here in the Granite State, the numbers nationally tell a different story.

NHPR/Sheryl Rich-Kern

Vermont Senator and Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is back in the Granite State this week. He spent part of Monday afternoon in Nashua, where he courted students.

Sanders stood behind the podium in a large classroom at Nashua Community College on Monday afternoon. He tailored his remarks for the setting and his audience – about 100 community college students.

Sanders talked about increasing funds for public education, from early childhood learning to college.

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is kicking off a two-day campaign swing through the Granite State.

The Vermont Senator will meet with students at Nashua Community College Monday afternoon. That will be followed by a town hall meeting in Hollis at 5:30.

And Tuesday evening, Sanders will open a campaign office in Rochester, and is set to hold another town hall meeting in Hampton.

Republican candidates will be in Las Vegas early this week for the next GOP debate Tuesday.

There are many ways to describe Bernie Sanders: a democratic socialist, an independent senator, a Democratic presidential candidate. But the best adjective may just be: consistent. No matter how you label it, Sanders' worldview is locked in.

Over 40 years, Sanders has built his political career on a very focused message about what he calls a "rigged economy."

Sara Plourde/NHPR

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is waving off super PACS that want to help him.

In an email Monday to supporters, his campaign manager Jeff Weaver says Sanders has been surprised to learn about the pro-Sanders campaigns of outside groups that are allowed to raise unlimited amounts of money from donors. Sanders rails against such groups on the campaign trail, saying they contribute to a corrupt political system.

"They should spend their money somewhere else," Weaver writes in the email. "We do not want their help."

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Over a presidential campaign season that grows longer every four years, candidates have long counted on voters changing their minds before Primary Day. But we don’t often hear about how or why voters make up their minds in the first place. NHPR followed up with three voters to see how they are forming – and changing—their opinions over the course of the campaign.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

Democratic presidential candidate and Vermont U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders sat down with Exchange host Laura Knoy and Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers for an in-depth discussion about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season. 

flickr/barjack

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition most Monday mornings for "On The Political Front."

Bernie Sanders, the Vermont senator and Democratic presidential candidate, stopped by New Hampshire Public Radio's offices in Concord Friday morning for a conversation with The Exchange

On the way up, Sanders offered a quick "elevator pitch" for why he thinks he should be president — and took a moment to mingle with a (very) young potential constituent.

Sara Plourde/NHPR

In a forum with NHPR Friday afternoon, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders outlined a clear standard for who he'd nominate to the Supreme Court if elected. 

Sanders said before he'd tap any new justices to the bench, there is one test they'd have to pass. 

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