body cameras

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The New Year will bring plenty of new rules and regulations to New Hampshire, covering everything from police body cameras to the use of laser pointers. Here's a look at some of the bills that will officially be law as of January 1st:

Via tainoconsultinggroup.com

 

 Police in a New Hampshire town will soon be wearing body-cameras full-time.

The Goffstown Police Department announced Wednesday that officers will be wearing the cameras by the end of the week.

Police say officers will notify all parties whenever they're being recorded during a police interaction. The video files will be stored and secured.

Each camera costs $399 and can record for about 12 hours.

TSCeleb News / Flickr/CC

With more attention to problems in police-community relations around the country, one change that nearly everyone agrees on in the Granite State is the need for more body cameras. We'll discuss a bill that proposes rules for New Hampshire law enforcement that may opt to use the technology, addressing questions of privacy, effectiveness, storage, protocol, and cost.

Photo: West Midlands Police/cc/flickr

 Police officials say the cost to outfit Portsmouth officers with body cameras could cost as much as $18,000 a day.

The Portsmouth Herald reports the Police Department's business manager Karen Senecal told the Police Commission Tuesday that the cost to operate body cameras on police officers would be about $6,000 a shift. 

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A government official in Portsmouth says he will advocate for the use of car and body cameras by "all police personnel" in the southeastern New Hampshire city.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Assistant Mayor Jim Splaine plans to bring the proposal to the city council as soon as members begin reviewing the police department's budget.

Splaine says the cameras help increase police transparency in addition to providing a permanent record of how officers conduct themselves while on-duty.

Dashboard camera video shows two police officers firing shots as a knife-wielding Hagan Etsy-Lennon ran at them on a North Country road.

Officers kept firing as Etsy-Lennon fell at their feet. 

The release of the footage followed a legal fight over how much of the police video should be made public.  

The town of Haverill and several New Hampshire New Hampshire  media outlets sought 4 videos: footage from the bodycams of the three Haverhill police officers present when Etsy-Lennon was killed, and tape from the dashboard camera of one of the officer’s patrol cars.

N.H. Attorney General

A New Hampshire Superior Court has ordered the partial release of body camera videos showing two officers shooting and killing a man who lunged at them with a knife.

The case was the first of its kind, according to the New Hampshire Civil Liberties Union.  The family asked for the videos not to be released, citing its right to privacy, and concern the deceased man’s children would see the video of their father’s death. The Valley News and  other media outlets sought the videos under the state’s Right To Know law.

NH Attorney General

Should body camera footage of a man being gunned down by police be released to the public?

That’s the question before a Merrimack County Superior Court judge, who will rule whether to release the video over the objections of the family of the man killed.


Photo: West Midlands Police/cc/flickr

 

Selectmen in the town of Bethlehem have approved body cameras for police officers.

The cameras will be chest-worn devices that can record for five or six hours. Plans are for police to start using them in August.

The Caledonian Record reports that each of Bethlehem's seven police officers will have one for motor vehicle stops and dispatched calls. Individuals pulled over or stopped must be notified the camera is on.

Police in other towns have been using body cameras, such as Haverhill and Weare.