Campaigns

Courtesy JimmyTingle.com

From Tina Fey’s "Sarah Palin" to Larry David’s "Bernie Sanders", politicians are red meat for comedians. But for some, impersonating a candidate isn’t enough. On today’s show, Boston comic Jimmy Tingle throws his hat in the ring - again!

Then, politicians have a long and storied past with music, from Bill Clinton playing saxophone on late night TV to Mike Huckabee playing bass in his band Capital Offense. But perhaps the most perplexing display of musical...uh...prowess: Bernie Sanders' folk album.

Also we’ve got another episode of the 10-Minute Writer’s Workshop with bestseller Marianne Williamson.

NHPR Staff

Every four years in New Hampshire, the presidential primary season is heralded by the flowering of lawn signs. And while yard signs are hardly the most innovative campaign technique available today, a new scientific study suggests these old-fashioned political tools can still have an impact.

While Hillary Clinton enjoys wide support in the Democratic presidential race across much of the country, in New Hampshire, Sen. Bernie Sanders still poses a threat. In Portsmouth Tuesday, Clinton spoke to a crowd that included voters weighing both candidates.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

If you’re hoping to follow the money in the 2016 presidential primary race, you’ve got a tough task. The fundraising tools available to candidates and their supporters are perhaps more complicated now than in any previous campaign. You've got your political actions committees (or PACs), your super PACs, your exploratory committees, your run-of-the-mill candidate committees, and countless other groups throwing their 2 (billion) cents into the 2016 presidential race.

Evan Hahn via Flickr Creative Commons

Produced by Avishay Artsy

We all have our linguistic pet peeves. I, for one, bristle when I hear “literally” to describe things that aren’t literal at all. I admit, I was an English major, and still grieve a little inside when people use “was” for the conditional tense instead of “were.” A painter and writer living in Los Angeles is campaigning against a far less arcane peeve: the overuse of “awesome”. 

For those who revel in political swag and campaign catering, the New Hampshire primary is a perfect opportunity to socialize with like-minded supporters and bathe in the glow of national media.  But for many others, politics are a private affair – that is until you receive a pre-recorded via the home phone - usually, right around dinner time.