Cancer

The Exchange
9:00 am
Tue January 6, 2015

Science Cafe: Cancer Screenings - How Much Is Too Much?

Credit Javier Romero Otero / Flickr/CC

Our Science Café tackles medical screening: while advances allow detection of diseases like prostate and breast cancer much earlier, some in the medical field worry about the potential for over-diagnosis and overtreatment.  But patients and doctors alike are dealing with risk and anxiety, and many feel that if widespread testing can save even one life, it’s worth it.

GUESTS:

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Giving Matters
12:55 am
Sat December 6, 2014

Giving Matters: A Lifeline For Kids With Cancer And Their Families

The mission of Childhood Cancer Lifeline is to “empower New Hampshire families who are coping with childhood cancer.” The Konrads are one such family.

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Health
4:30 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Cheshire Lands $1.1 Million Grant For Healthy Monadnock Plan

Cheshire Medical Center-Dartmouth Hitchcock Keene

A plan to make the Monadnock region one of the healthiest communities in the country has received a financial boost from the federal government.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has awarded $1.1 million to Healthy Monadnock 2020, an initiative of Cheshire Medical Center-Dartmouth Hitchcock Keene. The hospital is working with schools, farmers and other private and public entities to prevent some of the leading causes of death, such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

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Health
3:19 pm
Mon September 22, 2014

Granite State Has Highest Rate Of Breast Cancer

Credit Jason Meredith

New Hampshire has a higher rate of breast cancer than any state in the U.S. according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In 2011 - the most recent data available is from back - out of every 100,000 people in the state, there were 141.7 cases of breast cancer. In part, that’s because of demographic; breast cancer is most prevalent in white women, and New Hampshire is about 94 percent white.

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NH News
12:54 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Seabrook Representative Dies Following Battle With Brain Cancer

State Representative Amy Perkins of Seabrook died this morning after being diagnosed with brain cancer more than a year ago.

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NH News
11:41 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Family Of 12-Year-Old Hudson Girl Seeks FDA Exception For Cancer Drug

McKenzie Lowe
Credit www.change.org

U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte is reaching out to the Food and Drug Administration in an effort to help a Hudson girl with a rare form of brain cancer.

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Word of Mouth
10:49 am
Thu August 8, 2013

A Lesson in Dying

Credit Garrett Vonk

 

When it comes to sharing tough news with family members, or witnessing a patient’s final moments, knowledge of human anatomy and diseases is only so helpful. Abby Goodnough, writer for The New York Times, talked with us about the incredible opportunity that Martha Keochareon afforded medical students at Holyoke Community College. Martha, a nurse dying of pancreatic cancer, offered herself up to nursing students at Holyoke Community College as a case study in terminal illness. This is the conversation we had with Abby back in January.

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Word of Mouth
10:49 am
Mon May 20, 2013

The Philadelphia Chromosome: A Mutant Gene And The Quest To Cure Cancer

Schematic representation of formation of the Philadelphia Chromosome
Credit via wikimedia commons

In 1959 scientists caught their first glimpse of a genetic mutation, ‘the Philadelphia chromosome’ and began unraveling the mysterious role it plays in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and led to the development of Gleevec, a groundbreaking drug that made this once-fatal cancer treatable with a single daily pill. Jessica Wapner is a freelance science writer, and her new book chronicling the back story behind the breakthrough, “The Philadelphia Chromosome: A Mutant Gene and the Quest to Cure Cancer at the Genetic Level” was released this month.

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Word of Mouth
11:06 am
Wed May 15, 2013

The Sun's Blood Pressure Benefits

Credit krishram27 via Flickr Creative Commons

For years, fear of skin cancer has had us slathering 50+ SPF sunscreen, donning hats or avoiding prolonged sun exposure under umbrellas or shade. Some unexpected research recently out of Edinburgh University could shift the perception of sun as unrelenting enemy. In the study, UV rays were found to release a compound that lowers blood pressure. On the line to explain how we might weigh the sun’s benefits and drawbacks is Doctor Richard Weller,  Senior Lecturer of Dermatology at Edinburgh University.

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EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Avoiding Environmental Cancer Triggers

Credit iStock Photo

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: I know that some of us are genetically predisposed to get cancer, but what are some ways we can avoid known environmental triggers for it?-- B. Northrup, Westport, MA

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Health
6:00 am
Thu March 7, 2013

Soothing Cancer With The Arts

Jessica Gebard works on her writing with Marv Klassen-Landis
Liz Faiella/NHPR

A creative arts program at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon is helping cancer patients and their families deal with life-changing illness.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:34 am
Mon April 9, 2012

Wider Use Of Breast Cancer Radiation Technique Raises Concern

This illustration shows a device made by MammoSite used to deliver targeted doses of radiation as part of brachytherapy.
Courtesy Radiological Society of North America

When Lisa Galloway was trying to decide what kind of radiation treatment to undergo after surgery for early breast cancer, she jumped at the chance to get a newer, quicker approach.

Instead of dragging on for weeks, the newer form of radiation, called brachytherapy, only takes five days.

"Five days compared to 33 days, I was like, 'Yay!' " says Galloway, 53, of Silver Spring, Md. "So I wanted it so badly. I got it — I got my wish."

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Word of Mouth - Segment
10:30 am
Thu April 5, 2012

Lifestyle, As a Cancer Preventative

Photo by d o l f i , courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

 

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U.S.
12:02 pm
Mon March 26, 2012

Komen Struggles To Regain Footing, And Funding

Participants at the 2012 Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure Southern Arizona in Tucson. As in several other regions, enrollment in the fundraising event was down this year.
Ted Robbins NPR

It's Race for the Cure season in many parts of the U.S. The signature fundraisers of the Susan G. Komen for the Cure foundation draw crowds of men, women and children dressed in pink to city streets around the nation each year.

The national breast cancer charity's decision to cut — and then restore — funding to Planned Parenthood created a firestorm early this year. The decision generated heated debate and led to the resignation of a number of the organization's top leaders.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:01 pm
Wed March 14, 2012

Doctors Revamp Guidelines For Pap Smears

Cells gathered during a Pap test. Those on the left are normal, and those on the right are infected with human papillomavirus.
Ed Uthman Wikimedia Commons

Women should get screened for cervical cancer far less frequently than doctors have long recommended, according to new guidelines released Wednesday.

More than 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer every year in the United States, and more than 4,000 die from the disease.

For years, doctors have recommended that women start getting Pap smears every year or two to try to catch signs of cancer early, when it's easiest to prevent and treat.

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The Salt
5:15 pm
Mon March 12, 2012

Death By Bacon? Study Finds Eating Meat Is Risky

This would be considered a "once in a while" food.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 12, 2012 11:14 pm

Bacon has been called the gateway meat, luring vegetarians back to meat. And hot dogs are a staple at many a backyard BBQ.

But a new study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine finds that daily consumption of red meat — particularly processed meat — may be riskier than carnivores realize.

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The Salt
12:01 am
Wed March 7, 2012

Coca-Cola Modifies Caramel Color To Avoid Cancer Warning Label

Coca-Cola says the caramel coloring in its signature soda has always been safe.
OmerSukruGoksu iStockphoto.com

When the state of California added the compound 4-methylimidazole, also known as 4-MI or 4-MEI, to its list of known carcinogens in 2011, it created a problem for the soda industry.

The caramel color they used to give colas that distinctive, brown hue contained levels of 4-MI that would have warranted a cancer warning label on every can sold in the state.

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StoryCorps
3:41 am
Fri March 2, 2012

'Life Is Really Good,' Says Cancer Survivor, 12

Jennifer Coursey with her son, 12-year-old Grant Coursey, at StoryCorps in Ukiah, Calif.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri March 2, 2012 8:27 am

When Grant Coursey was a toddler, he was diagnosed with neuroblastoma, a cancer often found in young children. A tumor had wrapped itself around Grant's spinal cord and had grown so that it pushed against his lungs.

Now 12, Grant is cancer-free; he received his first "clean" scan 10 years ago in March 2002. He had to undergo several procedures to rid his body of the cancer.

Recently, Grant and his mother, Jennifer, sat down to talk about his young life and how cancer has affected it.

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cancer
5:15 pm
Thu February 23, 2012

Specialty Hospitals Get A Favorable Vote

The House Health and Human Services Committee has sent an amended bill allowing not just Cancer Specialty Hospitals but all specialty hospitals to bypass the Certificate of Need process. All other hospitals in the state must go in front of the CON board to gain approval for new or expanded services.

Rep. Lynn Blakenbeker, Republican of Concord, voted in favor of the bill.

"We as a state should be encouraging businesses all kinds to come into the state especially when it comes to specialty healthcare treatment we should be offering all options," she says.

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Health
3:58 pm
Sun February 19, 2012

What's The Cure In The Race Against Breast Cancer?

Breast cancer survivors stand to form the shape of a pink ribbon at a Susan G. Komen Foundation charity race in Tyler, Texas, in 2004.
Tom Worner AP

Tracy Grant was just 39 when she got the diagnosis.

"They asked me to stay a little bit longer because they saw something a little weird," she remembers. "In my mind I was saying, ... 'Here we go, this doesn't look good.' "

It was breast cancer. As devastating as the news was, it wasn't a surprise. Her mother, Catherine Grant, was diagnosed at age 51.

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NPR News
4:27 pm
Mon February 13, 2012

For Komen, Walks Will Be Fundraising Test

Several thousand people participated in the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure in Tyler, Texas, in 2007. Some walkers for this year's races, including the 3-Day walk, are worried that they might have trouble raising money because of the Planned Parenthood controversy.
Scott M. Lieberman AP

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 12:30 pm

Over the weekend, the Susan G. Komen foundation held meetings in 15 cities around the country for people who have registered for this summer's 3-Day walks.

The annual events are key fundraisers for the breast cancer research and treatment organization. But after the recent controversy over Komen's grants to Planned Parenthood, some walkers are worried it might be harder to get donations this year.

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