Charlottesville

A still from Vice News "Charlottesville: Race and Terror"

New Hampshire-based white nationalist Christopher Cantwell remains in custody in Virginia, where he's raising money and hosting a podcast from his jail cell.

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The back-and-forth between Dartmouth faculty and College President Phil Hanlon continues over the school's response to comments by Mark Bray. Bray is a faculty member and has been a prominent speaker on the Antifa movement since the clashes in Charlottesville.

In a statement last month, President Hanlon distanced the college from Bray's comments around the role of violence in taking on white supremacy.

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Faculty members at Dartmouth are criticizing the college for its statement about a lecturer who's been speaking widely on the so-called Antifa movement.

The events that occurred in Charlottesville, Virginia earlier this month sparked a national dialogue about racial tensions in America.

It’s a conversation that's continuing in classrooms across the state, as another school year gets underway.

We asked four New Hampshire teachers how they’re planning to incorporate discussions about the violence that occurred in Charlottesville into their classrooms. We asked them to record themselves and send in their thoughts; here’s what we heard:

James Gaj, Nashua High School South

Courtesy of Bo Worth

Hundreds gathered for a candlelight vigil in Keene Sunday night in response to events in Charlottesville earlier this month.  

The vigil, organized by local faith leaders, aimed to put politics aside, to bring people together with a message of love.

Following remarks from Mayor Kendall Lane and Rev. Elsa Worth of St. James Church, the crowd lined the streets of downtown, joining together in song. 

Joshua Roberts/Reuters

It’s been just over two weeks since a group of white nationalists and neo-Nazis - including a man from Keene - marched with torches across the University of Virginia campus.

A 20-year-old woman was killed when a man drove his car into a group of counter protesters.

Now, as the school year gets underway this week, teachers in cities and towns across New Hampshire are preparing to talk with students about what happened in Charlottesville.

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A group in the North Country will host a vigil Friday in response to the violence in Charlottesville. There will be similar events in Keene and Portsmouth on Sunday.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Christopher Cantwell has been in the news in Keene this week. The city resident - and white nationalist - was featured in a Vice documentary about the clashes in Charlottesville that aired on HBO and went viral online. In the footage, he expresses his hatred for black people and Jews.

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The headquarters of the New Hampshire Republican Party in Concord was vandalized overnight.

When GOP staffers arrived at their office in Concord Thursday morning, they were greeted by a ten-foot tall heart spray painted on the back of the building. In the heart's center was the word "NAZIS" in capital letters.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: August 18, 2017

Aug 17, 2017

Continued fallout and reactions to events in Charlottesville, VA, dominate the headlines this week. New Hampshire politicians respond to the President’s ambiguous statements on white supremacy. And yes, there are white supremacists here in New Hampshire. 

In other news, the federal government says New Hampshire's Medicaid funding mechanism might be illegal. Manchester is considering filing its own lawsuit against an opioid company for its alleged role in the state opioid crisis.


A still from Vice News "Charlottesville: Race and Terror"

A prominent white nationalist who was active in clashes in Charlottesville this weekend is a resident of Keene.

Christopher Cantwell hosts a live-streaming call-in show from a studio in town. He argues for a white state without blacks, Jews or immigrants of color. 

Updated at 7:26 p.m. ET

In a stunning reversal from comments he made just one day prior, President Trump said on Tuesday "there's blame on both sides" for the violence in Charlottesville, Va.