Chris Sununu

NHPR Staff

President Trump and Congressional Republicans are considering transforming  Medicaid - which provides health services to millions of low income people - to a block grant program. New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu is pitching the potential change as a way to better serve local needs, but it’s also one that carries risk.

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu signed his first bill into law Wednesday, repealing the license requirement to carry a concealed gun.

The new law, which takes effect immediately, is the first tangible outcome of Republican control in Concord.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu presented his $12 billion, 2-year state spending proposal to House and Senate budget writers for the first time Tuesday.

josh rogers\nhpr

The Executive Council was set to confirm Frank Edelblut at its last meeting, when councilor Andru Volinsky, a democrat who opposes Edelblut, questioned if the Governor had met his legal obligation to "consult" the state board of education about the nomination.

Sununu had spoken with the board's chairman, but decided to postpone the vote until he could meet with the whole board.

A Conversation With Governor Chris Sununu

Feb 13, 2017
Allegra Boverman; NHPR

We sit down with Governor Chris Sununu. The new governor delivered his first budget on Thursday, boosting spending in many areas. We'll talk about that -- and about the Governor's plans for workforce development, reducing energy costs, and Medicaid expansion. We'll also get his take on President Trump's recent claims of widespread voter fraud in New Hampshire. 


Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

New Hampshire's budget process continues this week as House Finance members now take a crack at crafting a new state spending plan.

He didn't talk about it much as a candidate but as Governor Chris Sununu has made passage of a right-to-work law a top priority.

Sununu invoked it in his inauguraul address and in a speech at the state GOP's annual meeting. Right to work cleared the senate but may be losing steam in the house, where the labor committee voted to reject it by a 2-1 margin. The full house votes on it next week. Sununu says he expects a tight vote but won't take the lead in workign to convince those still on the fence.  

Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu laid out his 2-year budget proposal Thursday afternoon at the State House.

The plan comes in at roughly $12 billion with increased spending for public kindergarten, state infrastructure and the opioid crisis.

Hannah McCarthy for NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu delivered his budget address Thursday, outlining his priorities as the state Legislature kicks off its biannual budget writing cycle.

NHPR's newsroom has been reporting on what to expect this budget season — you can find a rundown on that right here — and now, we're offering more context on the things Sununu mentioned in the budget address itself.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Update: Thanks to all who sent in your questions! We received dozens in response, and to allow our team to prepare for Monday's interview, we're no longer soliciting additional questions at this time. 

Make sure to tune in Monday morning (on-air or online) to hear the full conversation with Gov. Chris Sununu — and, potentially, to hear an answer to questions from your fellow New Hampshire residents.

NHPR/Hannah McCarthy

Gov. Chris Sununu helped to announce a new partnership on Wednesday aimed at reducing the stigma of addiction.   

Speak Up New Hampshire is the latest campaign from the Partnership for a Drug-Free New Hampshire. Joined by the Bureau for Drug and Alcohol Services, the Governor’s Commission, and various addiction treatment and prevention organizations, the Partnership is now concentrating on reducing the stigma of addiction in the Granite State.

NHPR Staff

Governor Chris Sununu delivers his budget proposal to lawmakers this week. It’s the first step in a months-long journey to build a two-year spending plan that will affect nearly every aspect of life in New Hampshire.

To help you prepare for the months of headlines to come, NHPR reporters are highlighting areas of the budget that are likely to generate the most discussion.

 

No one has ever called crafting a state budget easy. There are thousands of decisions and myriad competing interests. And for a new governor, there is also the crunch of getting it all done and printed a mere six weeks after taking office.

But if Gov. Chris Sununu is at all anxious about his final product, he isn’t showing it.

joshrogers\nhpr

Four of the last five governors have used judicial selection commissions to help them find and vet possible judges. Governor Sununu says relying on outside advice, from lawyers, businesspeople and law enforcement worked for his predecessors, and helps inspire public confidence in the court system.

"It’s as system that's worked very well, and to make sure you are not just putting your political friends in there.  That's not the way we do things in NH, and so we thought the judicial selection commission was a great mechanism to ensure that type of transparency."

josh rogers\nhpr

With Republicans controlling the Executive Council, Gov. Chris Sununu's pick to lead the New Hampshire Department of Education, former gubernatorial candidate Frank Edelblut is expected to win confirmation. But Democrats pushed Edelblut on his background – he has no professional  experience in education and homeschooled all seven of his children - and core beliefs. 

Sara Plourde / New England News Collaborative, NHPR

While Republican governors in Massachusetts and Vermont expressed concern over the weekend about President Trump’s recent executive order on immigration and refugees, New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu took a more neutral stance when weighing in on the issue Monday.

profilestrategygroup.com

Michael Sununu, brother to Gov. Chris Sununu, is criticizing the science behind a recent bipartisan state report on the impact of climate change on the Seacoast.

In a 25 page critique, Michael Sununu calls the Coastal Risks and Hazard Report “alarmist hand wringing” that would lead to wasteful spending of public money.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In one of his very first acts in office, Governor Chris Sununu called for a 90-day moratorium on new state regulations. But lawmakers who oversee New Hampshire's regulatory process said the new governor Friday: no can do. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu is asking Congress to give states as much flexibility as possible to design their own health care systems as part of the federal effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Sununu is offering his thoughts in a letter to U.S. House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy sent Wednesday. Congress is soliciting governors' feedback on changes to health care. Sununu says a new system should avoid "onerous regulations" on states.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: January 20, 2017

Jan 19, 2017

Governor Sununu picks a former rival to head the education department, and orders restrictions on state hiring.  First District Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter will not attend Donald Trump's inauguration, going to a religious service instead. And new numbers show the state's unemployment rate at just 2.6 percent. 

GUESTS:

Chris Jensen for NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu has nominated longtime state fire marshall Bill Degnan to another term.

Degnan has held the job since 2004 but his reappointment caused a feud in the state firefighting community.

Todd Bookman for NHPR

Frank Edelblut is a staunch school choice advocate who homeschooled his seven children. Governor Sununu says Edeblut's experiences, which include no professional work in education, make him a good pick for education commissioner.

Governor Chris Sununu has nominated former political rival Frank Edelblut as commissioner of the state Department of Education.

The announcement was a brief, unceremonious item on the Executive Council’s agenda Wednesday morning as Governor Chris Sununu read off a list of nominations.

“For the Commissioner of the state of the New Hampshire Department of Education I nominate Frank Edelblut of Wilton New Hampshire.”

But the choice signals a big shift in priorities for the state agency.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Due to what he says is a projected budget shortfall, Gov. Chris Sununu is calling on state commissioners to hold off on new hiring for the next six months. 

Over the new few months, NHPR is bringing you a new way to experience Granite State stories from a whole new angle — literally. With 360-degree videos like this one, we're hoping you'll be able to more closely explore the places, and meet the people, we reporting on.

Cathy Merrill, Facebook

Traditionally, New Hampshire's poet laureate reads a poem at the inauguration of a new governor. This year, however, Gov. Chris Sununu chose someone with a different talent. 

Thomas Gehrke / Flickr Creative Commons

 

In his inaugural address last week, Gov. Chris Sununu made it clear he thinks the state must — and can — act to reduce the state's high cost of electricity.

“We can’t be passive anymore," Sununu said. "We have to find the right solutions to get it done and get it done our way. Do we need to look at Northern Pass? You bet we do — 1,100 megawatts of clean, renewable energy? How do we say no to that when we have the highest rates in the country? We can help ratepayers.”

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

State financial experts say New Hampshire is starting the year off in better fiscal health than expected. That’s good news for lawmakers charged with crafting the next two-year state budget.

When he ran for governor Chris Sununu described NH as "a regulatory police state."

This 90-day review, which is Sununu's first policy move since taking office, is aimed at easing mandates across government.

For a regulation to survive,  Sununu wrote, department heads should be able to show that there is a clear need for it; that it is best addressed by the agency; that its cost does not exceed its benefit and that its effectiveness can be measured.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

It’s tradition in New Hampshire for the new Governor to meet and greet his constituents following the inauguration. The reception line lets voters come face to face, if only for a moment, with the state’s next chief executive.

Most New Hampshire residents will never meet their governor. But on Inauguration Day, after the swearing in and the speech, the pomp and ceremony, the newly minted governor grants an audience to anyone willing to wait in line.

Pages