Classical Music

These broadcast-only events featuring the Boston Symphony Orchestra performing hand-picked listener favorites from the 2014-2015 season will air in the Concord area at WCNH 91.5 and WEVO 89.1 HD2. [Streaming content will vary.]

Sunday broadcasts run 2:30 - 5 pm.

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The 63rd season of the New Hampshire Music Festival is now underway. There will be some classics, some lesser known works, and some big ideas that connect them all together.

The festival’s music director, Donato Cabrera, talks with Weekend Edition about this year's season, which focuses on "American Landscapes." 

Hear classical performances from Tanglewood this summer - live! These special broadcast-only events featuring the Boston Symphony Orchestra performing at the Koussevitzky Music Shed at Tanglewood will air in the Concord area at WCNH 91.5 and WEVO 89.1 HD2. [Streaming content will vary.]

Sunday broadcasts run 2:30 - 5 pm. 

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Sunday, July 12, 2:30 p.m.

Boston Symphony Orchestra
Ludovic Morlot, conductor
Pinchas Zukerman, violin

New Hampshire's Poet Laureate Is Hooked On Bach

May 12, 2015
Keene State College

Bach’s “Goldberg Variations” were first published in 1741 and consisted of an aria and 30 variations made up of 32 measures each – a sampler of Western dance music enjoyed during his time.  In her new collection, New Hampshire Poet Laureate Alice Fogel borrows that structure to invent 30 poems of 32 lines each.  The book is called “Interval: Poems Based on Bach’s Goldberg Variations.”

CNH Presents will air Thursdays at 8 p.m. and again Saturdays at 11 a.m..

NH Music Festival, 7.11.13
Mendelssohn: The Hebrides Overture, Op. 26

Symphony NH Orchestra and Chorus, 11.23.13
Gershwin: An American in Paris

NH Music Festival, 7.26.12
Adams: Chairman Dances

NH Music Festival, 7.12.12
Dvorak: Slavonic Dance: Furiant #1
Dvorak: Slavonic Dance: Polka
Dvorak: Slavonic Dance: Furiant #2
 

Logan Shannon / NHPR

Wednesday’s attack on the offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris prompted an international outpouring of support from satirists and comedians around the world. On today’s show, a candid conversation with the former editor of The Onion on the careful craft of satire.

Plus, the manliest man of Russia. A simple Google search reveals countless images of Vladimir Putin, riding horseback, hunting, and brandishing weapons. We’ll talk to a scholar about how the Russian leader uses machismo and gender stereotypes to build political legitimacy.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Miguel O. Strauss via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/89BTbC

Bankrupt orchestras, aging audiences, skyrocketing tuition at conservatories; the death knell for classical music in America is sounding again. On today’s show, a concert cellist offers some tough love for the classical music world.

Then we’ll investigate the condiment that brought down an empire. Among the disturbing parallels between America and the fall of Rome: over reliance on one condiment!

Plus: we’ll sample some of history’s craziest hangover cures. From fried canary to raw eel.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Live Metropolitan Opera Saturday radio broadcasts can be heard from December through May on ClassicalNH; start times will vary (see schedule below).

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Rossini's Il Barbiere Di Siviglia
December 6, 2014 12:00 pm ET
Mariotti; Leonard, Brownlee, Maltman, Muraro, Burchuladze

Janet Ramsden via Flickr Creative Commons

Why is six scared of seven? Because seven, eight, nine. Jokes like this are only one example of the ways that we humans like to assign personality traits to the numbers that dictate our world. Today on Word of Mouth we explore this seemingly universal tendency to create emotional associations with numbers.  Then, is tipping culturally determined? Freakonomics investigates the nuances of tipping in the United States with the help of Cornell professor Michael Lynn. Plus, Botox is well known for freezing the faces of many a Hollywood starlet, but how about freezing out negative emotions? We hear from journalist Taffy Brodesser-Akner about how Botox is being used to treat depression.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


In February, 1995, violinist Roman Totenberg performed with the New Hampshire Symphony Orchestra. He joined NHPR ahead of the concerts on our Perspectives program and spoke with host Laura Kiernan.

Sheryl Rich-Kern / NHPR

Symphony NH, the granite state's oldest professional orchestra, invited 16-year-old harpist Crystal Napoli to solo at two of their performances; an opportunity that is the stuff of dreams for young classical musicians.

The symphony's music director, Jonathan McPhee, extended the invitation to Crystal after seeing her performance as the 2011 winner of the concerto competition at the Manchester Community Music School.

NASA HQ PHOTO via flickr Creative Commons

Chalk up another casualty to the economic crisis of 2008…The American Orchestra. Throughout the 1990s, major orchestras grew inside of an economic bubble of their own -- with donors and corporations funding generous contracts for musicians, and underwriting new concert halls and designing ambitious programs to court bigger audiences.  That bubble has since burst, exposing some of the nation’s premiere institutions to bankruptcies, foreclosures, lockouts and strikes. Philip Kennicot art and architecture critic for the Washington Post and he wrote about the current crisis facing America’s orchestras for New Republic.

Sean Hurley

In 2006, Plymouth resident and PSU Music Professor Jonathan Santore was named New Hampshire Composer of the year.  Just last month, he was awarded The American Prize in Choral Composition for 2013. As he tells NHPR's Sean Hurley, he's come a long way since playing trumpet for his high school marching band in Tennessee. 

French composer Erik Satie once remarked, "Before I write a piece, I walk around it several times, accompanied by myself,"  It's a creative prelude that Plymouth composer Jonathan Santore finds absolutely necessary.

Sheryl Rich-Kern / NHPR

Symphony NH, the granite state's oldest professional orchestra, invited 16-year-old harpist Crystal Napoli to solo at two of their performances; an opportunity that is the stuff of dreams for young classical musicians.

The Apple Hill Center for Chamber Music brings musicians from around the globe to tiny Nelson, New Hampshire. They learn and share chamber music, and come to understand one another’s cultures and perspectives. Amelia Perron talks about her experience there.

Joshua Bell

Feb 12, 2013
Mark Holm via joshuabell.com

A few years ago, violin virtuoso Joshua Bell set up as a busker at D.C. subway station. The former child prodigy whose concert performances command hundreds of dollars made less than fifty bucks that day. Joshua Bell doesn’t play it safe. He’s been called a “classical music rockstar” with 40 albums to his credit ranging from solos to movie scores.

Gina Gioldassis / NHPR

The New Hampshire Music Festival is holding an open house to welcome their new musical director to the state.

Donato Cabrera is the man Festival officials say will provide “bold, visionary leadership” in the years to come. But first, he joins All Things Considered host Brady Carlson to talk about his new job - which, by the way, is in addition to jobs with orchestras in San Francisco and Green Bay.

crazybobbles via Flickr Creative Commons

Listeners tuning in to WWHK in Concord might remember the station as the “The Hawk,” which had a classic rock format.

Now, the station has changed its tune in a big way.  Classical covers of songs like “Pour Some Sugar on Me” are all that have played on 102.3 for weeks. The music, recorded by the L.A.-based Vitamin String Quartet, is a placeholder, and not likely to last. 

The Monadnock Music Festival’s 47th season is getting underway, and the group is calling the new season the start of a new era, after a period of reorganization both in Monadnock Music’s structure and in leadership.

The agricultural port city of Stockton, Calif., has made national and international news in recent years — for all the wrong reasons. In a new record, the city recently marked its 56th homicide in one year. And the BBC recently reported that a greater proportion of Stockton residents face the loss of their homes to foreclosure or repossession than anywhere else in America. If that's not enough, it ranked No.

ClassicalNH Launched!

Feb 20, 2012

New Hampshire Public Radio has teamed up with Highland Community Broadcasting to make classical music more readily available to the Granite State and beyond.

This collaboration allows an expansion of services in the Capital Region and enables both organizations to take advantage of new technologies now available on HD Radio and online.

For his third symphony, the 26-year-old American composer Mohammed Fairouz decided to incorporate text in three languages. Poems and Prayers, which had its debut Thursday in New York, features passages in Arabic, Hebrew and Aramaic.

The symphony was commissioned by Northeastern University, where Fairouz teaches. The idea was to write something exploring the conflicts in the Middle East, so for inspiration, Fairouz delved into the region's poetry — both ancient and modern.

The NHSO Conductor Search Continues

Apr 9, 2001
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