Climate Change

Concord joins Portsmouth, Nashua, Keene, and Lebanon in announcing its support for the international climate agreement known as the Paris Accord.

President Trump said he would pull the U.S. out of the agreement earlier this summer.

Rob Werner is a Concord city councilor.

Keith Shields; NHPR

In light of the recent hurricanes slamming the Gulf Coast and Southeastern United States, The Exchange spoke with Perry Plummer, Director of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, Jonathan Winter, a Dartmouth professor who has studied increasing precipitation over the last two decades in New England, and two engineers, Jim Gallagher, who specializes in dams, and Fred McNeill, who works in wastewater treatment, about how well New Hampshire is prepared for major weather events. 

New Hampshire is unlikely to bear the direct brunt of a storm like Hurricane Harvey, but the state has experienced its share of disasters, from historic flooding to a tornado that killed a Northwood woman in 2008.

It’s those sudden or “no-notice” storms that keep Perry Plummer, director of New Hampshire Homeland Security and Emergency Management, on his guard. He wishes more people were prepared for major storms.

“We as citizens are under-prepared for disasters in this country,” Plummer said. “It’s a wake-up call for everybody.”

Britta Greene/NHPR

More than 100 people gathered on the Lebanon green Saturday to rally against a proposed natural gas development in town.

NHPR Staff

Protesters sat in the black plastic chairs of the Keene City Council chambers in June, hand-lettered signs at their feet. At issue at the meeting was a proposal by Liberty Utilities.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Democratic U.S. Senator Maggie Hassan says the Trump administration should endorse the findings of a federal report on climate change that was recently leaked to the New York Times.

At a League of Conservation Voters event in Portsmouth, Hassan told reporters that while she had concerns about the leaking of draft documents, she thinks the Trump administration should endorse the report’s findings.

The report, compiled by scientists from 13 federal agencies concludes that climate change is already affecting Americans’ daily lives.

The city of Lebanon has joined the growing list of New Hampshire communities signing on to the goals of the Paris Climate Accord.  

The Lebanon City Council vote was unanimous Wednesday night. Councilors acknowledge that the move doesn't mean any practical changes for the city -- they already have policies on the books to significantly reduce their greenhouse gas footprint. 

New Hampshire Fish & Game

Climate change, which causes rising temperatures, increasingly severe weather events, and shrinking habitats, negatively impacts the moose and loon populations of New Hampshire more than any other factors -- including human interference from road construction or hunting and fishing practices.

That's according to longtime wildlife observers, who joined The Exchange to deliver an update on these two beloved new Hampshire species. 

 

Over a million dollars is headed to New Hampshire to help protect coastal communities.

Šarūnas Burdulis / https://flic.kr/p/8q4XT1

A large, privately held piece of land in Hanover will be protected under a new agreement between the land's owners and the Hanover Conservancy, a private non-profit conservation group.

The land, just over 300 acres northeast of town, overlaps with the Appalachian Trail and is home to woods, streams and wetlands. Those features, plus its location and high elevation, made it particularly attractive to the Hanover Conservancy.

Keene has joined a growing number of cities around the country committing to the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement.

What's Next For Climate Change Efforts in N.H.?

Jun 21, 2017
WPS Geography

President Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement set off protests nationwide - with some Governors, cities, and businesses, signing on to their own pledges.  But how much does Paris really matter - to what's already happening in New Hampshire?  We'll sort out the politics from the policy. 


Downtown Portsmouth.
Squirrel Flight via Flickr/Creative Commons: http://www.flickr.com/photos/squirrelflight/1355544138/in/photostream/

Nashua and Portsmouth have joined a growing number of cities around the country committing to the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement.

In the days since President Donald Trump decided to pull the U.S. out of the global climate accord, over 270 mayors across the country have signed on to a plan to stay in.

Now the cities of Portsmouth and Nashua have added their names to the list. Jack Blalock is mayor of Portsmouth.

Allegra Boverman

New Hampshire's Republican governor says he won't join an alliance set up by other states pledging to uphold the Paris climate change accord.

Amy Quinton, NHPR

New Hampshire imports all of its fossil fuels, meaning a lot of money leaves the state to keep our lights on. Local clean energy companies want to change that, by transitioning to renewable sources like solar and biomass. 

Congresswoman Annie Kuster expressed support Monday for New Hampshire’s green energy economy  and opposition to Donald Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord. Speaking in Peterborough alongside clean energy advocates, Kuster said the state should stay committed to the goals of the Paris agreement and invest in New Hampshire energy.

N.H. Public Radio

New Hampshire's Democratic congressional delegation has harshly criticized Republican President Donald Trump for withdrawing the United States from the Paris climate change accord.

They said the decision ignored the impact that climate is having on the Granite state and beyond and also cedes the leadership role on containing greenhouse gas emissions to other countries, including China.

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen called the decision "a devastating blow to America's global leadership with grave implications for New Hampshire and future generations."

The Otter, Flickr

By the end of this century, scientists predict the ocean on New Hampshire’s coast will rise anywhere between 4 and 6.5 feet above where it is today—a consequence of climate change. But when the sea rises, groundwater rises to keep up. That would spell trouble for roadways, even roads inland from the ocean, according to a new study from UNH.

Flikr Creative Commons / blmurch

Over the past century, heavy rainfall and snowstorms have grown more frequent and more severe in many parts of the U.S.—including the northeast—as a result of our warming climate. In a study published last month, researchers from Dartmouth College, University of Vermont, and Columbia University investigated exactly what those changes looked like here in New England.

On Saturday, people will march through downtown Concord, part of a nationwide demonstration called March for Science.

Organizers say the marches are nonpartisan, but many taking part cite concerns over the Trump administration’s uncertain position toward climate science, as well as proposed budget cuts.

It’s raising questions about whether scientists should get involved in what could be perceived as a political event.

We tagged along with Diane DeLuca, a biologist with NH Audubon on her rounds of the Deering Wildlife Sanctuary. DeLuca has been working on their Phenological Monitoring Pilot Project, and defines phenology as "the study of 'phenophases', which are the different phases that plants and animals go through in their life cycle each year." 

    

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Those early hints of spring can call to a gardener like a siren song. Yet the urge to get one’s seeds into dirt can be dangerous: most seedlings won’t survive a single frost. To help with that, gardeners use 30-year averages that predict when the last frost will probably occur. The thing is, in New England, climate change has temperatures rising relatively quickly.

University of New Hampshire

Monday is the vernal equinox: that’s the beginning of spring, according to astronomers. For ecologists, spring isn’t just a matter of the earth’s rotation around the sun.  

NHPR

The winter tourism industry in New Hampshire provides thousands of jobs and garners millions of visits to resorts across the state. In the past few years, however, shorter, irregular seasons have forced ski resorts to adapt, either by using snow machines far more than expected, or preparing for fewer customers. Today, we're looking at how skiing, and winter sports, are changing across the Granite State. 


Kieth Shields; NHPR

A continuation of our series on New Hampshire infrastructure: wastewater and dam structures are old, crumbling, and vulnerable to severe weather. Intense storms, flooding, and drought have all contributed to the damage, and many of our dams and underground pipes are over 100 years old. We'll discuss the challenges with tackling this problem, including lack of funding, and stricter regulation requirements.


Jason Moon for NHPR

Yesterday, a new report was released with suggestions for how Seacoast communities should prepare for the effects of climate change. The document could influence town planning and development in the region for years.

The report came from the Coastal Risk and Hazards Commission, which was created by the legislature back in 2013. It had 37-members representing Seacoast towns, state agencies, and private-sector interests.

UNH Art Department

Climate change is by and large an issue discussed by scientists, but a current show at 3S Artspace in Portsmouth is devoted to the topic. 

“Rise: Climate Change in Our World” is an exhibition featuring work by current students, alumni, technical staff and faculty from UNH.  The UNH art department collaborated with NextGen Climate NH, an environmental advocacy organization and 3S Artspace. 

AMS Archives / Flickr/CC

A new book by Stephen Long describes how this giant storm transformed the New England landscape and seared itself into the memory of its people.  We’ll delve into just how big it was, the wide-ranging impacts, including how the hurricane created public works projects and developed new thinking around forestry. We'll also talk about preparation for the next inevitable great storm.

  This program was originally broadcast on 4/11/16.

Jason Moon for NHPR

For New Hampshire’s Seacoast, it’s no secret that climate change and the resulting rise in sea-level rise is one of the biggest challenges facing the region. But while the threat is well known, the ways Seacoast communities are preparing for it aren’t always what you’d expect. NHPR’s Jason Moon reports for our month-long series Life on the Seacoast.

Granite Geek: What is "Rock Snot?"

Jun 29, 2016
N.H. DES

Researchers say an algae called "rock snot" that was thought to be an invasive species in the Northeast is actually native to the northern United States. So if “rock snot” has been here for a long time, why haven’t we noticed it before? To answer this question we turn to Granite Geek David Brooks. He’s a reporter with The Concord Monitor and writer at Granitegeek.org, and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss the matter. 

  

Gundina / Morguefile

Think back for a moment to last December. Do you think it was warmer than average? Colder? About average?

A new study suggests that your answer to that question may depend on a few factors, such as whether or not you believe in climate change or how many kids you have. By the way, December was warmer than average—much warmer, with temperatures shooting nearly 14 degrees above the average.

Pages