Climate Change

AMS Archives / Flickr/CC

A new book by Stephen Long describes how this giant storm transformed the New England landscape and seared itself into the memory of its people.  We’ll delve into just how big it was, the wide-ranging impacts, including how the hurricane created public works projects and developed new thinking around forestry. We'll also talk about preparation for the next inevitable great storm.

  This program was originally broadcast on 4/11/16.

Jason Moon for NHPR

For New Hampshire’s Seacoast, it’s no secret that climate change and the resulting rise in sea-level rise is one of the biggest challenges facing the region. But while the threat is well known, the ways Seacoast communities are preparing for it aren’t always what you’d expect. NHPR’s Jason Moon reports for our month-long series Life on the Seacoast.

N.H. DES

Researchers say an algae called "rock snot" that was thought to be an invasive species in the Northeast is actually native to the northern United States. So if “rock snot” has been here for a long time, why haven’t we noticed it before? To answer this question we turn to Granite Geek David Brooks. He’s a reporter with The Concord Monitor and writer at Granitegeek.org, and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss the matter. 

  

Gundina / Morguefile

Think back for a moment to last December. Do you think it was warmer than average? Colder? About average?

A new study suggests that your answer to that question may depend on a few factors, such as whether or not you believe in climate change or how many kids you have. By the way, December was warmer than average—much warmer, with temperatures shooting nearly 14 degrees above the average.

minwoo / Flickr CC

With their thick, hard shells, oysters may appear well protected, but a lot can go wrong before they end up in markets and restaurants.

Greenhouse gas emissions blamed for global warming also are making the ocean more acidic, which can interfere with the ability of shellfish like oysters to develop their shells. 

We tagged along with Diane DeLuca, a biologist with NH Audubon on her rounds of the Deering Wildlife Sanctuary. DeLuca has been working on their Phenological Monitoring Pilot Project, and defines phenology as "the study of 'phenophases', which are the different phases that plants and animals go through in their life cycle each year." 

  Environmental advocates say they hope to raise awareness about climate change by highlighting its projected effects on New Hampshire's maple syrup industry. 

nshepard via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/rS6ha

When it comes to the players and intrigues of primary politics, Fergus Cullen, has plenty of stories. On today’s show, the former chair of the New Hampshire Republican Party dishes on some key moments of primaries past.

Plus, a look back at the first woman from a major party to run for President - Margaret Chase Smith.

And we'll remember an environmental issue that dominated the headlines decades before climate change was on the radar.

Whatever happened to the hole in the ozone, and other stories from a not-so-bygone-era.

What The Paris Climate Conference Means for N.H.

Dec 1, 2015
Paris Climate / Flickr/CC

The U.N. Climate Change Conference seeks agreement on limiting global warming to just two degrees Celsius over the next century.  Many say that's a tall order, but some are hopeful this summit could be more successful.  We'll take a New Hampshire look at this, including state impacts and efforts.

   

Guests:

Ron Sher; PREP King Tide Photo Contest

Thirty-five mayors and other local elected officials from coastal communities all over the country gathered in New Hampshire this weekend to talk about Sea Level Rise. They came from both parties, and they didn’t wind up in the state that hosts the nation’s first primary by accident. 

Basically anywhere with a coast was represented.

Mayors and other local elected officials from coastal communities all over the United States gathered in Hampton Saturday, hoping to capture the attention of candidates visiting the first in the nation primary state.

 

Keeping the maple syrup flowing for generations to come will be the focus of a panel discussion and pancake breakfast at the University of New Hampshire.

Wednesday's panel includes local maple syrup producers, scientists and others speaking about climate effects on forests and maple trees. Among the speakers are Martha Carlson, a conservationist and educator who owns Range View Farm; Chris Keeley, the climate program coordinator at UNH Cooperative Extension and Jennifer Wilhelm of the New Hampshire Food Alliance.

iStock Photo/Thinkstock

  A bill to take New Hampshire out of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI, has been changed in the House Committee on Science, Technology and Energy.

It would now maintain New Hampshire’s participation in the program but would allocate all of the money raised by the program away from renewable energy projects and into electric rate relief.

Right now, the state puts four out of every five dollars it gets per carbon allowance into rate subsidies.

NASA / Flicker CC

There’s a cold snap on the way.

At least one town in Wyoming has set a new all-time low for the month of November, and that arctic air mass is now barreling its way toward New Hampshire.

While it’s unclear to what extent this cold actually is a piece of the polar vortex, that doesn’t mean the vortex isn’t an important driver of New England’s winter Climate. Experts are debating if more extreme swings from warm to cold are part of what a changed climate will look like in New England.

New federal science education standards adopted in Vermont require that students learn about climate change. So teachers are starting to create lesson plans with hands-on activities about weather patterns.

Some are getting that training deep in the woods of the Northeast Kingdom.

Michael O'Brien / Flickr/CC

Last week, more than 100 world leaders attended the United Nations summit on climate change in New York City.

Via Creative Resistance

More than two hundred New Hampshire residents are headed to New York City Sunday for a massive climate change demonstration.

Organizers of the People’s Climate March – which include environmental advocacy groups, labor unions, and religious organizations – think anywhere from one to four hundred thousand people could be in attendance.

From the Granite State there are 3 full charter buses leaving from Concord,  another two are coming from Maine to pick up folks in Portsmouth.

Kevin Bryant / Flickr CC

Researchers studying the Gulf of Maine say its waters are warming faster than 99 percent of the world’s oceans, and worry the rising temperatures will hit New England commercial fisheries hard.

The study is still in its preliminary phase, and is being conducted by scientists at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute. According to their data the waters off of New England’s coast are warming by about a half a degree Fahrenheit per year on average. That gives the region a dubious distinction.

kohane via Flickr CC

 

  Today, about 70 percent of the earth’s oxygen comes from marine plants. We slip beneath the surface to find out how a rebounding whale population could help spur phytoplankton growth…and slow climate change. But first: more than 4000 wells have been drilled since 2008, and the county expects to be pumping for decades. A UNH professor explains why he set out to learn more about North Dakota’s oil country, by walking 65 miles across it. Plus, we take a look at the China-based e-commerce behemoth Alibaba, the most powerful company you’ve never heard about.

National Marine Sanctuaries via Flickr CC

The oil boom is on in McKenzie county, North Dakota. More than 4000 wells have been drilled since 2008, and the county expects to be pumping for decades. Today, a UNH professor explains why he set out to learn more about North Dakota’s oil country, by walking 65 miles across it. Then, about 70 percent of the earth’s oxygen comes from marine plants. We slip beneath the surface to find out how a rebounding whale population could help spur phytoplankton growth…and slow climate change. Plus, we take a look at the China-based e-commerce behemoth Alibaba, the most powerful company you’ve never heard about.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


christopher.woo via Flickr Creative Commons

We spoke with Freakonomics co-author Stephen Dubner about three issues that have been dominating headlines lately. In case you’ve missed them and need to catch up quickly, we’ve compiled the highlights so you can be a champion of serious water-cooler discussions.

The major take-away? Dubner urges you to think like a freak, and to listen to more public radio.

Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish, New Hampshire, is hosting a presentation on the effect of climate change on historical sites.  The discussion is scheduled for Tuesday, June 10 at 6 p.m.  It will look at how New Hampshire's archaeological resources, historic buildings and cultural landscapes are affected and threatened by sea level rise, coastal erosion, increased flooding, heavy rains and insect infestations.

Flkr Creative Commons / PSNH

Under a proposed rule out of the EPA Monday, New Hampshire will have to come up with its own plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. However, many of the building blocks for that plan are already in place.

The new EPA rule says that New Hampshire should emit 486 pounds of carbon per megawatt hour of electricity generated, and that, as of 2012, New Hampshire’s rate was 905 pounds per megawatt hour.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Paul Schaberg marshals a small team of scientists, surveying a stand of red spruce in Colebrook for frost damage from last winter.

“So what are you guys seeing, are you seeing any injury yet?” he calls out.  

“We’re just seeing green needles,” hollers back one of his helpers.

“Happy, happy trees,” responds another.

Flooding near Main Street Museum in WRJ, VT
Ann and Dan / Flickr Creative Commons

The Environmental Protection Agency and Antioch University New England are hosting a climate change adaptation conference in Manchester this week.  

Cedric via Flickr CC

New Hampshire is hosting a conference on climate change preparedness in the Northeast.

The conference is being held Monday through Wednesday in Manchester. Antioch University New England is hosting it along with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The conference is bringing together planners and decision-makers from the northern Chesapeake Bay to Maine to learn how to build healthy and resilient community plans, and how to prepare for the impacts of climate change.

Adapting To Climate Change; Flood Insurance

Apr 10, 2014
Andrew Naylor / Flickr/CC

Adapting to Climate Change

The White House has announced that New Hampshire will host one of seven regional “climate hubs”. The Forest Service’s Northern Research Center in Durham will provide technical support to farmers and land managers working to adapt to climate change.

Among the questions food producers and farmers are looking at these days is how they might be affected by a changing climate – and what they might do about it.

There’s certainly no shortage of enthusiasm for hitting New Hampshire’s ski slopes in winter, but there are concerns the industry is headed for tough times in years to come.

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