concealed carry

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A ruling by the New Hampshire Supreme Court could make it easier for out-of-state gun owners to obtain concealed-carry licenses.

The court on Thursday sided with a New Jersey man who argued that the New Hampshire Department of Safety overstepped its authority in 2013 when it enacted new rules for nonresidents applying for concealed-carry permits. Under those rules, applicants must supply proof that they have such licenses in their home states.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Democratic Gov. Maggie Hassan has vetoed a bill to remove the licensing requirement for carrying concealed guns as expected. 

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House lawmakers have voted 217-132 to require local officials to issue conceal weapons permits to person not barred from owning a gun.

The mostly party line vote came after the GOP-controlled house overturned a committee recommendation to kill the bill.

Seabrook Republican Max Abramson told colleagues this bill was about making sure a constitutional right is unabridged.

"Senate bill 336 would simply restore the right of law abiding gun owners, who have the lawful right to open carry, to simply put on their jacket."

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The New Hampshire Senate approved a bill that would get rid of the licensing requirement to carry a concealed firearm.

Thursday's vote came down 14 to 10 along party lines, with Republicans in favor. The bill now heads to the Governor.

If signed into law this measure would make it optional to have a conceal and carry license. It would also extend license renewal from every four to every five years.  

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The New Hampshire Senate returns this week with another loaded agenda. Meanwhile the House will have its hands full weighing in on dozens of Senate bills in committee.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

After a slow week at the State House, lawmakers will have long session days in both chambers with roughly 60 bills on the docket in the House and Senate. 

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

A bill that would crack down on sales of firearms to people banned from having guns is working its way through the State House.  

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

It was a long first day for the New Hampshire House, as lawmakers debated dozens of bills to begin the 2016 session.

The House passed a proposal, 206 to 146, to allow people to carry a concealed firearm without a license. A similar measure passed the House and Senate but was vetoed by Governor Hassan last year.

Michael Saechang / Flickr/CC

Two more high-profile mass shootings this past month have rekindled the national debate over guns, gun rights, and gun regulation. Politicians have weighed in from the Presidential campaign trail and on Capitol Hill, but common ground remains elusive. Some say we need to tighten laws and oversight in the interest of public safety, while others say the solution is for more civilians to arm themselves in the interest of self-defense.


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Gov. Maggie Hassan's veto of a bill to remove the licensing requirement for carrying hidden guns is hardly the last word on the issue.

The New Hampshire Liberty Alliance is organizing a rally on the Statehouse lawn on Saturday for gun owners. A Facebook page advertising the event encourages participants to peacefully exercise their rights to carry guns openly and concealed, if they have a license.

AP

As promised, Gov. Maggie Hassan has vetoed a bill that would have allowed anyone who can legally own a gun to carry it concealed without a license.

Currently, people need to get a permit from local officials to carry a concealed firearm beneath a coat or in a handbag. Hassan said although she supports the second amendment, she believes eliminating this step would “compromise the public safety of our citizens.”

North Country reps were almost evenly split on whether to allow concealed weapons to be carried without a permit.

As NHPR reported Senate Bill 116 would repeal the law requiring a permit for concealed carry – “unless such person is otherwise prohibited.”

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A bill repealing New Hampshire’s long-standing law requiring a concealed firearms permit was repealed by the House 212 to 150 on Wednesday.

In a statement Governor Maggie Hassan said before the vote that she would veto the bill, adding that the permitting system allows for local law enforcement to better keep the community safe.

But Republican John Tholl of Whitefield, a former state police officer, told his colleagues these public safety concerns are overblown.

NHPR

The New Hampshire House voted in a nearly a 2-1 margin to reject a bill to require criminal background checks on all commercial firearm sales.

Prior to the vote, Republican John Burt from Goffstown, argued that requiring criminal background checks would be a waste of time.

“All this bill is going to do is interrupt law-abiding citizens, that’s all any gun legislation does, because the criminal will always have his gun,” Burt said yesterday.

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With a new bill addressing how Granite Staters are allowed to carry a concealed gun, many are tapping in to the perennial conversation about concealed versus open carry. And while the right to bear arms is well-established in New Hampshire, there’s still debate about the who, where, and how when it comes to firearms.

GUESTS:

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Slightly more than half of the North Country legislators voted Wednesday in favor of allowing concealed weapons to be carried in the House chamber and Legislative Office Building.

The measure passed 248 – 149.

Those voting in favor of allowing concealed weapons:

* Brad Bailey, Republican, of Monroe

* Edmond Gionet, Republican, of Lincoln

* Erin Hennessey, Republican, of Littleton

* Linda Massimilla, Democrat of Littleton

* Larry Rappaport, Republican of Colebrook

* Herb Richardson (Republican) of Lancaster

How North Country Reps Voted On Gun Bills

Jan 27, 2012

As reported by NHPR the Senate recently delayed action on three gun bills.

The bills had already passed the House.

Here’s how sixteen representatives from the North Country voted before the bills went to the Senate.

House Bill 536which would allow carrying a concealed gun without getting a special permit.

It passed 193 – 122.