Crime

Golden View Health Care Center via Google Photos

The New Hampshire attorney general's office says a female nursing home resident who died had been attacked by a male resident suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

Attorney General Joseph Foster said 82-year-old Barbara Whittier died on March 16, after authorities responded to the Golden View Health Care Center in Meredith.

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Federal authorities on Thursday arrested a Rochester man for his role in a standoff by Nevada ranchers opposed to federal control of public lands.

Jerry Delemus, a New Hampshire Tea Party activist and co-chair of New Hampshire Veterans for Donald Trump, remains in federal custody after being charged with conspiracy, obstruction, assault and making threats during the 2014 armed standoff involving Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy. 

3.01.16: The Art of Moderating & the Confidence Game

Mar 1, 2016
Peter Roberts via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/7MUrSR

Last week's debate among republican presidential candidates was so raucous that at one point, the closed captions couldn't keep up and simply read "unintelligible yelling". Today, a seasoned debate moderator sheds light on the tough task of keeping onstage arguments civil, and what makes for a great debate.

Then, are human beings wired to be swindled? Later in the show we'll explore the psychology of con artists and why it's so easy to fall for them.

Via policearchives.org

A former deputy sheriff in New Hampshire is facing new charges of sexual assaults on inmates he was transporting.

WMUR-TV reports that former Belknap County deputy Ernest Justin Blanchette was indicted Thursday on multiple counts of sexual assault involving inmates.

Authorities told WMUR that Blanchette committed the acts on five different inmates while transporting them between correctional facilities across the state. He is charged with nine counts of aggravated felonious sexual assault and one count of felonious sexual assault.

A Seabrook woman has been sentenced to three years probation and six months of home confinement after pleading guilty to Social Security fraud. 

Manchester Man Pleads Guilty In Voter Fraud Case

Jan 18, 2016
justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

A Manchester man has pleaded guilty to voter fraud.

Tony Webster via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/4NPfdS

You might be surprised to learn that America’s murder rate has been steadily declining for more than two decades. Despite the drop, the number of murder cases being solved has remained flat.

On today’s show, technology, trust, and why cops aren't solving more murders. Plus, a grieving mother turns to art to remember her daughter, and other victims of New Hampshire’s heroin epidemic.

Andy L via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/deqA7J

The life of a 'repo man' is always intense; just imagine the stakes on the high seas. On today’s show, we’ll dive into the murky world of maritime "repo men", hired to recover ships stolen and scrubbed to hide their identity by gun runners, human traffickers, and pirates.

Then, for nearly 50 million U.S. workers, drug tests are a condition of employment. We'll look into the costs and efficacy of random drug testing. 

File photo

New Hampshire's highest court says it will hear the appeal of a man convicted of killing an 18-year-old woman more than four decades ago.

Robert Breest has denied beating Susan Randall to death and tossing her partially nude body onto the frozen Merrimack River in Concord in February 1971. Now 77, Breest has twice been denied parole because he refuses to admit to the crime and take part in sex offender treatment. Instead, he has tried to clear his name through DNA testing.

The New Hampshire Attorney General's Office released new information Tuesday about four unidentified people found dead in 1985 and 2000 in Bear Brook State Park in Allenstown.

Senior Assistant Attorney General Benjamin Agati announced the release of new composite images of the four victims that officials hope will make it easier to identify them. Agati also released new information about where the victims -- one adult woman and three children -- likely lived. 

Portsmouth Warns Residents About Ongoing Phone Scams

Oct 26, 2015
JonJon2k8 via Flickr Creative Commons

Police in Portsmouth are reminding residents about the dangers of a number of telephone scams. 

Dreamstime via Flickr CC

For the first time in decades, court-appointed lawyers who represent the poorest  clients will get a raise.

The raise from $60 to $100 dollars an hour would apply only to major crimes that take hundreds of attorney hours, like capital murder, and felonious sexual assault. The maximum fee cap for those crimes will also increase from $4,100 to $8,000.

valiantness via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/fRNWA6

This week, a federal judge sentenced peanut executive Stewart Parnell to 28 years in prison for his role in a deadly outbreak of salmonella…the first ever felony conviction for a food safety crime.  Today, we speak with the investigative reporter behind “Food Crimes” – a new video series examining everything from food borne illness, to the illegal saffron trade. Plus, a baffling new literary trend – why millions of Evangelical readers are snatching up Amish romance books.  

Nathan Rupert via flickr CC / flic.kr/p/aEtJLV

As schools across the country struggle to meet the new national common core standards, one controversial aspect of education is not part of the curriculum: sex education. On today’s show: the evolving debate around sex ed, and why it’s not strictly an American phenomenon. Plus, from false confessions to inadequate defenses, wrongful convictions can happen for many reasons. We’ll look at faulty eyewitness testimonies, the number one contributing cause of wrongful convictions.

Michael Brindley for NHPR

Police are asking for the public's help in trying to find out how and why a woman was shot and killed as she went for a weekly walk in a Manchester neighborhood.

Authorities say 62-year-old Denise Robert was walking in the North End section of Manchester at about 9 p.m. Sunday, an area regarded as a safe neighborhood, when she was shot. There were reports of a pickup truck speeding away with a white man in his 20s or 30s wearing a white tank top and having close-cropped hair.

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A cousin of one of the world's most notorious drug lords who prosecutors say was working to distribute cocaine in the United States has been sentenced in a New Hampshire court to 16 years in federal prison.

Manuel Jesus Gutierrez-Guzman, cousin of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, was sentenced Friday. He pleaded guilty in October to his role in a conspiracy to expand the reach of his cousin's drug empire into New England by distributing 1,000 or more kilograms of cocaine and other drugs. He was arrested in Spain in 2012.

Several hundred people attended a vigil in Barre Sunday to honor a Department for Children and Families social worker killed on Friday, apparently as the result of a child custody dispute.

Authorities believe three other apparent murders in Central Vermont are all connected to Jody Herring, the suspect in the Barre killing.

Durham Warns Residents About 'IRS' Phone Scam

Aug 10, 2015
JonJon2k8 via Flickr Creative Commons

Durham is the latest New Hampshire town to warn residents about a telephone scam in which callers tell residents they owe the government back taxes.

Police in Durham say several residents have received the calls, in which an individual claims to work for the Internal Revenue Service and demands payment of back taxes.

Authorities note the IRS contacts individuals about tax problems through the mail, not by phone, and that residents should report suspicious phone calls to law enforcement.

The Shame Show

Jul 29, 2015

From Hester Prynne’s Scarlet Letter to stockades in the town square, public shaming has deep roots in America. Today on Word of Mouth: humiliation hits the 21st century.  

The Technicality Show

Jul 27, 2015

We’ve all heard of a guilty person getting acquitted of crime because of a “technicality”.  What happens when a law professor discovers a judicial loophole that could make for the perfect crime? On today’s show, it’s all about the technicalities, the loopholes, artful dodges and escapes. From how to get away with murder, to how to turn the lights off when your religion prohibits it. Plus, the most expensive typo in American legislative history.

Updated at 2 a.m. ET

Lafayette, La., Police Chief Jim Craft said a gunman opened fire in a movie theater during a Thursday night screening of Trainwreck.

Craft said the gunman killed two people and wounded seven others before shooting and killing himself. At least three of the wounded remain in critical condition.

Police said they have identified the shooter but are not yet releasing his name. He was described as a 58-year-old white male armed with a handgun. Law enforcement officials said the gunman was attending the movie alone.

Giving Matters: Giving Kids A Second Chance

Jul 18, 2015

The Community Alliance Family Services is a Newport-based non-profit dedicated to supporting individuals and families in maintaining their independence. The organization’s Juvenile Court Diversion Program gives young people the opportunity to learn from, and make reparations for, their mistakes. By attending the program a juvenile offender avoids having the crime added to his/her permanent record. 

7.19.15: The Museum Show

Jul 17, 2015
Chris Ford via Flickr CC / //flic.kr/p/8RLhut

Most high stakes crimes require skill, bravado and planning…but few stir the public imagination or require the meticulous efforts of fine art frauds. Word of Mouth goes behind the scenes of the museum world, starting with a story about the extreme lengths art forgers will travel to dupe their marks. Then we take a look at the many dangers art can face….inside the museum. And, museums use digital and forensic technology to solve complicated art mysteries. Sometimes, it’s just old fashioned detective work…we’ll talk to a costume historian and dress detective about her work here in New Hampshire. Join us for a day at the museum.

Kim Benson via Flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/qHFLaX

Just about every creation of comedian Bill Cosby's has become radioactive in light of accusations of rape and assault by nearly 50 women. Yet, only one of those alleged assaults can still be prosecuted, due to statute of limitation laws that prevent older cases from going to trial. On today's show, we talk about statute of limitation laws, to better understand the sexual assault cases against Bill Cosby. Then, a look at the first use of the "PMS Defense" in a court of law. And finally we discuss how for one woman, party crashing led to a career as a writer, talk show host, and activist -- but for another type of crasher, the story takes a much different turn.

Marius Watz via Flickr CC / //flic.kr/p/2xBqFt

Fifty-five years ago, Harper Lee’s novel To Kill A Mockingbird gave the nation a glimpse of the deep south. Soon afterwards the author and the town that inspired the classic book disappeared from public imaginations. Today, we take a look at the conflicted history of a town that produced two great American authors. Then, the skill, planning, and access required to successfully dupe the art world easily captivates the public imagination. We’ll explore the meticulous effort behind some of the greatest art frauds. And, few people realize the danger works of art can face while safely housed inside a museum – from docents.

Courtesy of the Glessner House Museum in Chicago.

About seventy years ago, a North Country woman was one of the earliest proponents of forensics and an  analytical approach to crime investigation best known to many from the television program CSI. 

Paul L. Dineen via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/ebu1fU

“Birthday suit”, “in the buff”, “wearing nothing but a smile.” Call it what you will, on today’s show we’ll strip bare the American nudism movement and we’ll explore the progressive-era origins and continuing tensions over what it means to take it all off.

Then, we’ll hear about two young men who embarked on a bold crime spree, stealing thousands in gold and weapons. The hitch? It all went down in a video game. 

Keith Allison via Flickr CC

The state Attorney General's office is encouraging police departments statewide to adopt a new model policy on eyewitness identification procedures.

The policy was crafted in partnership with the Innocence Project, an organization that works to reverse wrongful convictions. Suspect misidentification is the most common contributor to wrongful convictions in cases where DNA evidence has exonerated someone, officials say.

thisweekinraymond.com

The city of Manchester could soon have a new police chief.

The Union Leader reports Mayor Ted Gatsas has nominated Assistant Police Chief Nick Willard to lead the department.

If aldermen approve the nomination, Willard would replace Chief David Mara, who announced earlier this month that he will retire at the end of June.

If he gets the job, Willard has already agreed to move to the city within 180 days.

JonJon2k8 via Flickr Creative Commons

State officials say the latest phone scam to target New Hampshire residents includes fraudulent threats to shut off utility service. 

The Public Utilities Commission and the New Hampshire Attorney General’s office say a number of consumers have received calls in which individuals claim to represent a utility. They claim the resident must immediately pay off a past due balance on his or her account or service will be disconnected. 

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