Cyber Security

NHPR's Rewind: Malice on the Internet - Then and Now

Jun 22, 2017
jacobfg via Flickr Creative Commons

Since the inception of the internet and the computer, society has been challenged with balancing technologies’ benefits and demerits.

On June 12, 2017, The Exchange held a discussion on cyberethics. This session discussed crimes captured on video and posted online. The program examined viewers’ and digital platforms’ responsibilities when coming across online crime videos; and how the excitement and potential celebrity status is an incentive for people to perform malicious acts.

Airman 1st Class Greg Nash

Technology is developing more quickly than the security to protect it, leaving the personal information of millions at risk. Your health records, schedule, shopping habits, and more are  vulnerable to potential hackers. As the "Internet of things" grows, and more companies collect information on their customers, called big data, how can you protect yourself?


Thomas Fearon

Governor Maggie Hassan says a cyber-security consultant will evaluate the Department of Health and Human Services’ computer network following a data breach that compromised personal information for as many as 15,000 DHHS clients.

National security has proven to be a pivotal issue in this year's Senate race between Sen. Kelly Ayotte and Gov. Maggie Hassan.

Ayotte, a Republican, has cast herself as a strong advocate for the nation's security, pointing to her record in the Senate. Hassan, a Democrat, has taken some positions that put her at odds with her own party and President Obama.

jdurham / Morguefile

 

School officials in Concord say the school district was the victim of a cyber attack that compromised the personal information of all employees with 2015 W-2 tax forms on file.

The superintendent's office says the discovery was made on June 1; the data breach itself happened on April 7.

WMUR-TV reports investigators said employees' personal information was obtained, including their addresses and Social Security numbers, as well as additional tax and contribution funds information. Network and email systems were not compromised.

Carly Fiorina
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In a conversation with NHPR’s The Exchange, Republican presidential candidate and former technology executive Carly Fiorina called for a more aggressive response when other countries wage cyberattacks on the United States.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

Sen. Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire is backing a measure to streamline the effort to stop cyberattacks against government computer networks.

CyberHades / Flicker/CC

A recent breach at insurance giant Anthem compromised the personal information of as many as eighty million Americans including more than six hundred thousand granite-staters. It was just the latest hacking attack of a major company, following Home Depot and Target. We’ll look at why this keeps happening and what protections show promise.

Guests:

Aaron P. Bernstein Getty Images

Following a recent hack of Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield, the insurer is gearing up to offer free credit monitoring services to members.

Anthem says it’s still unclear how many people’s data was stolen, so the company is acting as though all of its 290,000 members in New Hampshire are impacted. Hackers had access to personal information like social security numbers, addresses and phone numbers, but not medical or credit card data, according to Anthem.

Ed Skoudis

On Monday, the Washington Post reported that Chinese hackers had gained access to the designs of more than two dozen US weapons systems, including combat ships, aircraft, and missile defense systems. Although China denied the claims in the Defense Department report cited by the post, that country’s government announced earlier today that they have plans to conduct China’s first “digital military” exercise next week. President Obama and the Pentagon have increasingly addressed concerns about government-backed Chinese hackers in recent months, and next week, the president is scheduled to discuss cyber security with China’s president.

The Miniature Cyber-City: A New Training Ground

Jan 9, 2013
Courtesy Ed Skoudis

Computers are often associated with certain intangibles: data, communication, and storage space rank among them. At a recent hacker conference, a speaker presented his ability to tap into and display anything on the monitors of a public train system. Increasingly, computers are gaining an ability to control things in the real world. In anticipation of this threat, Ed Skoudis has created a real-life miniature training ground for tomorrow's cyber-warriors.

Defense Images via Flickr Creative Commons

The United States and other nations, along with terrorist and criminal groups, are increasingly engaged in high-tech espionage and cyber attacks, often with an aim at destabilizing communications and other critical infrastructure. We discuss the nature of this growing threat  and how it affects both government and the private sector.

 

Guests:

Siobhan Gorman, intelligence correspondent for The Wall Street Journal.