Democratic National Convention

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Even as she sat in the lobby of her hotel Thursday morning, hours before the convention was scheduled to gavel in, just a simple question was enough to move Judi Lanza to tears.

What would it be like for her, in the stands tonight, to watch Hillary Clinton accept the Democratic Party’s nomination?

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Ask around long enough on the floor of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, and you’ll find plenty of critiques about New Hampshire’s place in the presidential nominating contest.

At the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia Wednesday night, a retired Navy rear admiral with New Hampshire ties described Donald Trump as too erratic to lead the nation’s military.

John Hutson, who served as dean of the UNH School of Law for a decade, criticized the Republican nominee for endorsing torture and for proposals he says would require U.S. troops to commit war crimes.

“This very morning, he personally invited Russia to hack us,” Hutson said. “That’s not law and order; that’s criminal intent.”

NH Perspective: 2016 DNC Convention

Jul 27, 2016

Hillary Clinton makes history at the Democratic National Convention as the first female Presidential nominee of a major party. We get the Granite State perspective on party unity, disunity, and notable events. We examine what themes are emerging from the convention and how they might resonate with New Hampshire delegates and voters.  We'll also preview Clinton's acceptance speech.

GUESTS:

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

State Senator Martha Fuller Clark was the only one of New Hampshire's eight superdelegates to support Sen. Bernie Sanders.

That's despite Sanders' 22-point victory in in the state in February. 

She cast her vote during Tuesday night's roll call at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

But now that Hillary Clinton is officially the Democratic nominee and Sanders has endorsed her, Fuller Clark says it's time for all Democrats to rally behind the former Secretary of State.

Back in February, Bernie Sanders beat Hillary Clinton by 22 points in New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary.

But in the end, when the roll call took place on the floor of the Democratic National Convention Tuesday night, the Granite State was a tie: Its 32 delegates to the convention ended up splitting evenly between Sanders and Clinton.

Senator Bernie Sanders closed out the first night of the Democratic National Convention with a prime-time speech where he urged his supporters to carry on the campaign’s legacy while also uniting around Hillary Clinton.

A New Hampshire woman took the stage last night at the Democratic National Convention to talk about how the heroin and opioid addiction crisis is affecting her family.

Pam Livengood of Keene spoke about having to take care of her grandson Francis after her daughter and her boyfriend got caught up in drugs, starting with pain medication.

"For my 50th birthday, I got a 2-year-old," Livengood said at the start of her speech.

New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen focused on the opioid and heroin addiction epidemic during her speech Monday night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Shaheen shared with the audience the grim statistics from her home state, where more than four hundred people died of drug overdoses last year.

And she says while Hillary Clinton will work to solve the problem, Clinton’s opponent – Republican Donald Trump – doesn’t have a plan to deal with the issue.

Allegra Boverman/NHPR

N.H. Democratic National Committeewoman Kathy Sullivan says she's "outraged" by leaked emails that seem to show Democratic National Committee officials favored Hillary Clinton over Bernie Sanders during the primary.

"I think somebody was asleep at the switch because when you have a neutrality rule in place, you’re supposed to follow the neutrality rule closely," Sullivan told NHPR's Morning Edition. "I was very disappointed to see that it was not followed at the DNC."

NHPR's Casey McDermott is reporting this week from the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.  

Check this page frequently for updates, stories, photos, and to listen to live streaming coverage from the convention presented by NPR.

Click here for the live stream, which will broadcast coverage each day from 8 PM to 11 PM EST.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

To say that Pam Livengood made an impression on Hillary Clinton’s campaign might be an understatement.

The Keene resident first met Clinton last year, on the candidate’s first campaign visit to New Hampshire. At the time, she spoke up about how her family’s been affected by the state’s substance abuse crisis – she took over guardianship of her grandson a few years ago because of issues stemming from her daughter's drug addiction.

Amid furor over an email leak that revealed a bias against Bernie Sanders inside the Democratic National Committee, U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz announced Sunday she will step down as chair.

Wasserman Schultz will still open and close the convention, she said in a statement, and "address our delegates about the stakes involved in this election not only for Democrats, but for all Americans."

DARREN MCCOLLESTER / GETTY IMAGES

As the only New Hampshire superdelegate to support Sen. Bernie Sanders, state Sen. Martha Fuller Clark is nonetheless ready to unite around the Democratic Party's presumptive nominee, Hillary Clinton, heading into the general election.

Bringing the rest of the delegation on board, she says, might be more difficult.

A Keene woman will speak at the opening day of the Democratic National Convention next week.

Pam Livengood is one of the “everyday Americans” set to speak in Philadelphia, according to a schedule released by the Democratic National Committee.

Livengood opened up at Hillary Clinton’s first campaign stop in New Hampshire last year about how she and her husband are taking care of their grandson because his mother is battling drug addiction.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

The once-polite democratic presidential races has turned bitter. Sanders's supporters are increasingly agitated about the nomination process, while Clinton's campaign says the numbers strongly favor her and it's time to unify. And some activists want the DNC chair to resign, while others say all this just helps Donald Trump.


Florida Memory / Flickr/CC

Although Bernie Sanders won New Hampshire's primary by a landslide, he lags behind on so-called super delegates, who have already committed to Clinton. That raises questions among some about just how democratic the Democratic party is. Meanwhile, the Republican party has its own nominating process -- and challenges.

earmuffboy via Flickr/Creative Commons - http://www.flickr.com/photos/75613802@N00/7908920052/in/photostream/

The Democratic National Convention is getting underway tonight in Charlotte, North Carolina. While Granite State Democrats may not play as high-profile a role as their Republican counterparts did at the GOP convention last week, New Hampshire’s DNC delegation says it’s ready for a busy and exciting week.

All Things Considered host Brady Carlson spoke with delegate Jim Demers, a veteran Democratic activist and founder of the lobbying firm the Demers Group.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/newshour/7909240290/">Newshour</a> / flickr

NHPR will have special NPR live coverage of the Democratic National Convention being held in Charlotte, NC Sept. 4 - 6, each evening between 8 - 11 pm.

Listen to the radio, or stream on the NHPR iPhone app and by clicking the Listen Live button at the top of the page to hear this coverage. Find more information about the DNC coverage on npr.org.