Today four heads of Federal Reserve Banks gave public speeches about the economy – one of them was the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Eric Rosengren.

In his speech at St. Anselm College, Rosengren said the Fed’s policies had boosted the economy, and he said he expected more slow job growth over the next few years.

Eric Rosengren talks with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about the state of the US economy and our place in it.

A new report from the NH Center for Public Policy Studies shows that one of the biggest challenges facing cities and towns in the Granite State is reductions in state aid, while the demand for public services remains high.  This is even more amplified during our town meeting season as residents sort out what they can truly afford.  But some lawmakers argue that local control means local responsibility for funding these services.  We'll explore the arguments around this debate.


Unemployment In N.H. Ticks Up To 5.8%

Mar 5, 2013

The unemployment rate in New Hampshire rose a tenth of a point to 5.8% in January. More than 43,000 Granite Staters remain out of work.

But Annette Nielsen, an economist with NH Employment Security, says the trend for the state is heading in the right direction.

Nielsen: “The economy is growing...we are adding jobs, so people are not discouraged. They are actually encouraged by that activity so that they are joining in bigger numbers, and attempting to find employment.”

More than a year ago, Congress and the President agreed to these spending cuts, said to be so unpleasant they’d force leaders to craft a better deficit reduction plan.   Now, with the cuts set to begin, some predict a major hit to our economy but others believe that fear is exaggerated. We’ll get the latest and reaction in the Granite State.


President Obama has called for an increase in the federal minimum wage, and several New Hampshire Lawmakers have proposed raising it in the state as well. Supporters say this could help lift many out of poverty. But opponents warn it could lead to a loss of jobs. We’ll examine these arguments and how the economy might be affected.


Dave Juvet - Senior Vice President at the New Hampshire Business and Industry Association

Jeff McLynch – Executive Director of the New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute

To raise or not to raise the minimum wage? President Obama has called for an increase in the federal minimum wage, and several New Hampshire Lawmakers have proposed raising it in the state as well. Supporters say this could help lift many out of poverty. But opponents warn it could lead to a loss of jobs. We’ll examine these arguments and how the economy might be affected.


Dave Juvet - Senior Vice President at the New Hampshire Business and Industry Association

Yesterday, Governor Maggie Hassan presented her priorities for state spending. It was a long list that included more funding for mental health, higher education, state troopers and a new women’s prison.  On the funding side – Hassan proposed a higher tobacco tax and Casino Gambling. But not everyone agrees that the numbers add up.  We’ll look at the details and where the budget battles go from here.  


Map: Where N.H.'s Gun Manufacturers Are (And Aren't)

Feb 13, 2013
Amanda Loder / NHPR

Recently, NHPR examined the impact of the firearms industry on the state's economy.  Especially now, with gun sales at historic highs, this subset of New Hampshire's manufacturing industry is benefiting.  Looking at federal firearms manufacturing licenses, we've pinpointed where the state's firearms manufacturers are located.

N.H. Benefits From Firearms Boom

Feb 11, 2013
Amanda Loder / NHPR

As federal lawmakers grapple with tighter gun control laws, business is good for the firearms industry.Across the country, gun dealers can’t keep them on the shelves, and manufacturers can’t keep up with demand. But how do these trends affect New Hampshire's economy?

Author Molly Michelmore explores what she calls the fundamental paradox of American Politics:  We’re hostile toward taxes, but we also demand the privileges government offers from social security to local police protection.  Michelmore examines the history of this conundrum and finds these attitudes consistent from FDR’s New Deal to the Reagan Revolution.


United States Geological Survey via Wikimedia Commons

A recent report predicts slow growth in the new year for New Hampshire and New England. And, while the Granite State still ranks well on such measures as taxes and personal income,  there are some longer-term challenges that may threaten the so-called New Hampshire Advantage.  We’ll get the economic outlook for our state and our region.

Issue of the Week: The Economy

Nov 1, 2012
Flickr - Images of Money

Our issue of the week series concludes with economic policy.  No matter who wins office both nationally and in New Hampshire, they’ll face enormous budget challenges from the so-called “fiscal cliff” in Washington to tax and spending decisions in the Granite State.  And these actions will affect the broader economy.  We’ll look at the candidates’ positions.  


Are you better off now than you were four years ago? StateImpact New Hampshire looks at key economic indicators to understand how Granite Staters are doing.  And it's not the same for everyone. If you're a business consultant, construction worker, nurse or public servant -- come see how you fit into the puzzle, and share your thoughts -- at StateImpact New Hampshire.

Mixed news has recently come from the top part of our state.  The long awaited prison in Berlin is now open, and the popular ATV park is expanding, but unemployment there is higher than the state average and in recent months has gone up. We’ll look at the economic hopes and challenges for the North Country.


Charlie Jordan - editor of The Colebrook Chronicle

Edith Tucker - reporter for The Coos County Democrat and The Berlin Reporter

We look at a new study that suggests that those factors that have made New Hampshire the economic envy of the region, like its low tax burden, higher income levels and steady influx of well educated people may be waning.  And the one time New Hampshire advantage may be a thing of the past. We'll look at the study and see how bad it may be.


When we talk about challenges to the New Hampshire economy, we typically place them in context –  yes, there are challenges, but on the whole we’re in a pretty good place. After all, we have one of the nation’s highest median incomes and one of its most educated workforces, the foundations for economic success.

djwhelan via Flickr Creative Commons

Mitt Romney and President Obama frequently remind us, jobs and the economy are the issues of the 2012 presidential race. The loss of an estimated 3 million manufacturing since 2000 has carved a deep hole in the American economy. Many manufacturing jobs have gone overseas, taking a toll on the middle class wages that once anchored the American economy.

We kick off our “Issue of the Week” series with where the candidates stand on job creation.  It’s the number one talking point of this political season, with contenders for Governor, Congress and President offering up an array of solutions for getting Americans back to work.  We’ll compare their different plans, what the campaigns are saying and how it’s playing with voters.


Ross Gittell - New England Economic Project Forecast Manager and Chancellor of the Community College System of New Hampshire.

Ulrica / Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire has the lowest child poverty rate in the country.  That’s according to new numbers released by the Census Bureau. 

In the United States, the poverty line works out to less than $23,000 a year for a family of four—that means two parents and two children.  And fewer than one out of eight New Hampshire kids are living below that line.  That’s good news.  But Carsey Institute researcher Jessica Bean says the same family of four with even twice that income—close to $46,000—is still struggling.

New Hampshire Union-Leader

Much of the debate between congressional candidates Charlie Bass and Ann McLane Kuster could have taken place between candidates in just about any district in the country.  The forum, organized by the BIA and NHPR, centered almost exclusively on the national economy.   And most of the time, the congressional candidates stuck to broad party-line talking points. 

Take Democratic challenger Ann McLane Kuster’s point on taxes and deficit reduction.

DonkeyHotey / Flickr Creative Commons

StateImpact's Amanda Loder discusses the economic proposals of main Democratic gubernatorial contenders Jackie Cilley and Maggie Hassan with Morning Edition host Rick Ganley.

Tax Reform Focus of GOP Gov. Candidates' Job Plans

Sep 5, 2012
DonkeyHotey / Flickr Creative Commons

StateImpact's Amanda Loder discusses the economic proposals of Republican gubernatorial contenders Ovide Lamontagne and Kevin Smith with Morning Edition host Rick Ganley.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

One might think that the mom-and-pop motels of the 50’s and 60’s have all been replaced by cookie-cutter nationwide chains.

But some vintage lodgings in New Hampshire have found a way to prosper.

And now there’s an effort to push a plan to help them do even better.

We can’t blame Norman Bates for the decline of the mom-and-pop motels.

Screechy music from the shower scene in “Psycho.”

The Reluctant Recovery

Aug 15, 2012

More than three years after the recession was officially called “over”,the U.S. is still seeing sluggish growth in housing, business investment, and most importantly, employment.  We’ll ask why the economy seems so hesitant to take off including how much global woes and domestic political uncertainty are playing a role.  


Horia Varlan, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

A group of arts and media business owners have formed a coalition hoping to encourage film and TV production in the Granite State. 

The New Hampshire Production Coalition is currently developing a legislative plan that would help New Hampshire compete with more film-friendly states like Massachusetts, Michigan, New Mexico, and Louisiana.

Tim Egan, of the National Academy of Arts and Sciences, is the coalition’s president.

“Film, television, digital design, video gamers…  All the creative economy type industries don’t really have a trade association.”

Chris Jensen for NHPR

Bleak. Troubled. Struggling. Take the phrase “North Country economy”, and you’ll almost inevitably hear one of those adjectives attached to it.

And to a certain extent, it’s true; the northern New Hampshire economy has had a difficult run since the bottom fell out of the mill economy. But can a handful of downbeat adjectives really characterize a whole region’s economy?

Eighty-one percent of Coos County’s 2009 high school graduates say they don’t see job opportunities for themselves at home. And, more than 60 percent say they see those opportunities getting scarcer. That's according to the most recent survey results from the Carsey Institute's 10-year Coos Youth Study, published this week.

Anyone who’s been in this state in late July has seen  the traffic pattern – the long line of cars and trucks with boats or kayaks or bikes on the back, heading north on the highway to New Hampshire’s Lakes Region.  Some folks are heading toward campgrounds or b&b’s; some others are heading toward their own vacation homes, which in the Lakes Region can be pretty substantial.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

A new, two-year study of Coos County finds that the community is strong on cooperation, but struggles with the best strategy to create jobs.

NHPR’s Chris Jensen has more on the study done by the Carsey Institute

In 2009 UNH sociologist Michele Dillon began composing a picture of Coos County.

It would be a mosaic based in large part on about four dozen interviews with community leaders.

There have been two very distinct trends during the economic recovery: the first has been very slow growth in private sector hiring. The second has been a series of losses in public sector jobs, from state employees to firefighters to schoolteachers.